Title Instructors Location Time Description Cross listings Fulfills Registration notes Syllabus Syllabus URL
ALAN 241-001 Interm Mongolian II Narantsetseg Tseveendulam MW 03:00 PM-05:00 PM This course is a continuation of Intermediate Mongolian I. Mongolian is the national language of the independent State of Mongolia and the language of the nomadic warriors Genghis Khan (known to the Mongolians themselves as Chinggis Khan). It is also spoken in China and Siberia. Today Mongolian musical styles like throat singing (khoomii), products like cashmere (nooluur), and tourism to visit Mongolia's nomadic herders (malchid) are making a mark on the world stage. In this class the students will continue with the basics of modern Mongolian language, as spoken in Ulaanbaatar "Red Hero," the country's capital. They will learn in the phonetic Cyrillic script, which was adapted to Mongolian language from Russian in 1945, with a few additional letters. Intermediate and more advanced grammar will be taught through communicative methodology. Students will also have opportunity to experience Mongolian arts, culture, and cooking in and out of class. This is the first semester of Intermediate Mongolian. By the end of two semesters intermediate Mongolian, students will have learned all the noun forms, and all the major verb forms and will be able to form complex, multi-clause sentences, telling stories, expressing their feelings, and making arguments and explanations. They should be able to interact in all basic "survival" situations in Mongolia. Course Online: Synchronous Format
CHIN 002-680 1st Yr Spoken Chinese II Maiheng Shen Dietrich MW 04:30 PM-06:30 PM A continuation of CHIN001, This course is to help students develop their listening and speaking skills. The emphasis is on correct pronunciation, accurate tones and mastery of basic grammatical structures. By the end of the semester, students will be able to manage many situations that have immediate concern to them, such as relating one's personal life and experiences, expressing preferences and feelings, ordering meals, purchasing goods, asking for directions. To achieve this goal, the class is to be conducted in Chinese as much as possible. Chinese characters will also be introduced, but will not be the focus of the class. SEE LPS Course Guide. **This course fulfills LPS language requirement only. It does not fulfill the language requirement for other colleges only. Prior Language Experience Required
Crse Online: Sync & Async Components
https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021A&course=CHIN002680
CHIN 012-001 Beginning Mod Chinese II Jing Hu MW 10:00 AM-11:00 AM
TR 09:30 AM-10:30 AM
This course is the continuation of CHIN 011 The objective of the course is to help students build a solid foundation of the four basic skills--listening, speaking, reading, and writing in an interactive and communicative learning environment. The emphasis is on correct pronunciation, accurate tones and mastery of basic grammatical structures. By the end of the second semester, students will be able to manage many situations that have immediate concern to them, such as relating one's personal life and experiences, expressing preferences and feelings, ordering meals, purchasing goods and asking for directions. Prerequisite: Along with CHIN 011 and CHIN 112, this is the second course in a four-semester sequence. By completing all four semester. students fulfill the College language requirement. Course Online: Synchronous Format https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021A&course=CHIN012001
CHIN 012-002 Beginning Mod Chinese II Maiheng Shen Dietrich MTWR 11:00 AM-12:00 PM This course is the continuation of CHIN 011 The objective of the course is to help students build a solid foundation of the four basic skills--listening, speaking, reading, and writing in an interactive and communicative learning environment. The emphasis is on correct pronunciation, accurate tones and mastery of basic grammatical structures. By the end of the second semester, students will be able to manage many situations that have immediate concern to them, such as relating one's personal life and experiences, expressing preferences and feelings, ordering meals, purchasing goods and asking for directions. Prerequisite: Along with CHIN 011 and CHIN 112, this is the second course in a four-semester sequence. By completing all four semester. students fulfill the College language requirement. Course Online: Synchronous Format https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021A&course=CHIN012002
CHIN 012-003 Beginning Mod Chinese II Maiheng Shen Dietrich MTWR 12:00 PM-01:00 PM This course is the continuation of CHIN 011 The objective of the course is to help students build a solid foundation of the four basic skills--listening, speaking, reading, and writing in an interactive and communicative learning environment. The emphasis is on correct pronunciation, accurate tones and mastery of basic grammatical structures. By the end of the second semester, students will be able to manage many situations that have immediate concern to them, such as relating one's personal life and experiences, expressing preferences and feelings, ordering meals, purchasing goods and asking for directions. Prerequisite: Along with CHIN 011 and CHIN 112, this is the second course in a four-semester sequence. By completing all four semester. students fulfill the College language requirement. Course Online: Synchronous Format https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021A&course=CHIN012003
CHIN 012-004 Beginning Mod Chinese II Shihui Fan MTWR 12:00 PM-01:00 PM This course is the continuation of CHIN 011 The objective of the course is to help students build a solid foundation of the four basic skills--listening, speaking, reading, and writing in an interactive and communicative learning environment. The emphasis is on correct pronunciation, accurate tones and mastery of basic grammatical structures. By the end of the second semester, students will be able to manage many situations that have immediate concern to them, such as relating one's personal life and experiences, expressing preferences and feelings, ordering meals, purchasing goods and asking for directions. Prerequisite: Along with CHIN 011 and CHIN 112, this is the second course in a four-semester sequence. By completing all four semester. students fulfill the College language requirement. Course Online: Synchronous Format https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021A&course=CHIN012004
CHIN 012-005 Beginning Mod Chinese II Xiaomeng Zhang MW 01:00 PM-02:00 PM
TR 01:30 PM-02:30 PM
This course is the continuation of CHIN 011 The objective of the course is to help students build a solid foundation of the four basic skills--listening, speaking, reading, and writing in an interactive and communicative learning environment. The emphasis is on correct pronunciation, accurate tones and mastery of basic grammatical structures. By the end of the second semester, students will be able to manage many situations that have immediate concern to them, such as relating one's personal life and experiences, expressing preferences and feelings, ordering meals, purchasing goods and asking for directions. Prerequisite: Along with CHIN 011 and CHIN 112, this is the second course in a four-semester sequence. By completing all four semester. students fulfill the College language requirement. Course Online: Synchronous Format https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021A&course=CHIN012005
CHIN 012-006 Beginning Mod Chinese II Xiaomeng Zhang MTWR 03:00 PM-04:00 PM This course is the continuation of CHIN 011 The objective of the course is to help students build a solid foundation of the four basic skills--listening, speaking, reading, and writing in an interactive and communicative learning environment. The emphasis is on correct pronunciation, accurate tones and mastery of basic grammatical structures. By the end of the second semester, students will be able to manage many situations that have immediate concern to them, such as relating one's personal life and experiences, expressing preferences and feelings, ordering meals, purchasing goods and asking for directions. Prerequisite: Along with CHIN 011 and CHIN 112, this is the second course in a four-semester sequence. By completing all four semester. students fulfill the College language requirement. Course Online: Synchronous Format https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021A&course=CHIN012006
CHIN 022-001 Inten Mod Chinese III&Iv Chih-Jen Lee MWF 10:00 AM-12:00 PM
TR 10:30 AM-12:00 PM
Designed for students who have had limited prior exposure to some form of Chinese (Mandarin or other dialects), but inadequate to advance to the intermediate level. The language practiced in Chin 022 will be more formal and written style than that of Chin 021, including more authentic materials reading, listening and viewing. Course Online: Synchronous Format https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021A&course=CHIN022001
CHIN 032-001 Beg Rdg/Wrtg Chinese II Jing Hu MTWR 11:00 AM-12:00 PM CHIN 032 is designed for students who can speak Chinese and have reading ability of about 1000 Chinese characters. This Chinese reading and writing course is specifically designed for students at the ACTFL intermediate-low reading and writing level. The literacy goal is to master 1000 to 2000 Chinese words and reach the intermediate-mid proficiency level. Reading material covers topics that are meaningful to students not only to increase engagement and confidence in their Chinese reading skills, but also foster students' apprehension and understanding of the Chinese deep culture. Course Online: Synchronous Format https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021A&course=CHIN032001
CHIN 032-002 Beg Rdg/Wrtg Chinese II Grace Mei-Hui Wu MTWR 12:00 PM-01:00 PM CHIN 032 is designed for students who can speak Chinese and have reading ability of about 1000 Chinese characters. This Chinese reading and writing course is specifically designed for students at the ACTFL intermediate-low reading and writing level. The literacy goal is to master 1000 to 2000 Chinese words and reach the intermediate-mid proficiency level. Reading material covers topics that are meaningful to students not only to increase engagement and confidence in their Chinese reading skills, but also foster students' apprehension and understanding of the Chinese deep culture. Course Online: Synchronous Format https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021A&course=CHIN032002
CHIN 032-003 Beg Rdg/Wrtg Chinese II Jing Hu MTWR 12:00 PM-01:00 PM CHIN 032 is designed for students who can speak Chinese and have reading ability of about 1000 Chinese characters. This Chinese reading and writing course is specifically designed for students at the ACTFL intermediate-low reading and writing level. The literacy goal is to master 1000 to 2000 Chinese words and reach the intermediate-mid proficiency level. Reading material covers topics that are meaningful to students not only to increase engagement and confidence in their Chinese reading skills, but also foster students' apprehension and understanding of the Chinese deep culture. Course Online: Synchronous Format https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021A&course=CHIN032003
CHIN 032-004 Beg Rdg/Wrtg Chinese II Grace Mei-Hui Wu MW 01:00 PM-02:00 PM
TR 01:30 PM-02:30 PM
CHIN 032 is designed for students who can speak Chinese and have reading ability of about 1000 Chinese characters. This Chinese reading and writing course is specifically designed for students at the ACTFL intermediate-low reading and writing level. The literacy goal is to master 1000 to 2000 Chinese words and reach the intermediate-mid proficiency level. Reading material covers topics that are meaningful to students not only to increase engagement and confidence in their Chinese reading skills, but also foster students' apprehension and understanding of the Chinese deep culture. Course Online: Synchronous Format https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021A&course=CHIN032004
CHIN 042-680 Beginning Cantonese II Yan Huang TR 06:30 PM-08:30 PM A continuation of Beginning Cantonese I, this class is a preliminary course for spoken Cantonese. The course provides fundamental aspects of the dialect as experienced in daily life situations and will enable students to communicate in Cantonese for daily life needs, such as making phone calls, making purchases, getting around by various means of transportation, seeing a doctor, being a guest or a host at dinner, talking about the weather, talking about sports and entertainment, etc. Crse Online: Sync & Async Components
CHIN 052-680 Beginning Taiwanese II Grace Mei-Hui Wu TR 04:30 PM-06:30 PM A continuation of Beginning Taiwanese I, this course will cover language training as well as cultural topics including history and political aspects of Taiwan. Conversation topics range from daily conversation to professional and formal situations. Prior Language Experience Required
Crse Online: Sync & Async Components
https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021A&course=CHIN052680
CHIN 112-001 Beginning Chinese Iv Shihui Fan MW 10:00 AM-11:00 AM
TR 09:30 AM-10:30 AM
Along with CHIN011, CHIN012 and CHIN111, this is the fourth course in a four-semester sequence. The objective of the course is to continue building a solid foundation of the four basic skills--listening, speaking, reading and writing. By the end of this course, students should achieve the following goals: 1) pronounce all the sounds in Mandarin accurately and comfortably with a good command of the four tones; 2) carry out simple dialogues of familiar topics; 3) recognize and reproduce approximately 600-650 characters; and 4) read short textbook stories and write simple notes In order to develop students' listening and speaking ability, oral communication tasks are given every other week. Course Online: Synchronous Format https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021A&course=CHIN112001
CHIN 112-002 Beginning Chinese Iv Xiaomeng Zhang MTWR 11:00 AM-12:00 PM Along with CHIN011, CHIN012 and CHIN111, this is the fourth course in a four-semester sequence. The objective of the course is to continue building a solid foundation of the four basic skills--listening, speaking, reading and writing. By the end of this course, students should achieve the following goals: 1) pronounce all the sounds in Mandarin accurately and comfortably with a good command of the four tones; 2) carry out simple dialogues of familiar topics; 3) recognize and reproduce approximately 600-650 characters; and 4) read short textbook stories and write simple notes In order to develop students' listening and speaking ability, oral communication tasks are given every other week. Course Online: Synchronous Format https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021A&course=CHIN112002
CHIN 112-003 Beginning Chinese Iv Chih-Jen Lee MTWR 12:00 PM-01:00 PM Along with CHIN011, CHIN012 and CHIN111, this is the fourth course in a four-semester sequence. The objective of the course is to continue building a solid foundation of the four basic skills--listening, speaking, reading and writing. By the end of this course, students should achieve the following goals: 1) pronounce all the sounds in Mandarin accurately and comfortably with a good command of the four tones; 2) carry out simple dialogues of familiar topics; 3) recognize and reproduce approximately 600-650 characters; and 4) read short textbook stories and write simple notes In order to develop students' listening and speaking ability, oral communication tasks are given every other week. Course Online: Synchronous Format https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021A&course=CHIN112003
CHIN 112-004 Beginning Chinese Iv Mushi Li MTWR 12:00 PM-01:00 PM Along with CHIN011, CHIN012 and CHIN111, this is the fourth course in a four-semester sequence. The objective of the course is to continue building a solid foundation of the four basic skills--listening, speaking, reading and writing. By the end of this course, students should achieve the following goals: 1) pronounce all the sounds in Mandarin accurately and comfortably with a good command of the four tones; 2) carry out simple dialogues of familiar topics; 3) recognize and reproduce approximately 600-650 characters; and 4) read short textbook stories and write simple notes In order to develop students' listening and speaking ability, oral communication tasks are given every other week. Course Online: Synchronous Format https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021A&course=CHIN112004
CHIN 112-005 Beginning Chinese Iv Shihui Fan MTWR 02:00 PM-03:00 PM Along with CHIN011, CHIN012 and CHIN111, this is the fourth course in a four-semester sequence. The objective of the course is to continue building a solid foundation of the four basic skills--listening, speaking, reading and writing. By the end of this course, students should achieve the following goals: 1) pronounce all the sounds in Mandarin accurately and comfortably with a good command of the four tones; 2) carry out simple dialogues of familiar topics; 3) recognize and reproduce approximately 600-650 characters; and 4) read short textbook stories and write simple notes In order to develop students' listening and speaking ability, oral communication tasks are given every other week. Course Online: Synchronous Format https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021A&course=CHIN112005
CHIN 112-006 Beginning Chinese Iv Mushi Li MTWR 03:00 PM-04:00 PM Along with CHIN011, CHIN012 and CHIN111, this is the fourth course in a four-semester sequence. The objective of the course is to continue building a solid foundation of the four basic skills--listening, speaking, reading and writing. By the end of this course, students should achieve the following goals: 1) pronounce all the sounds in Mandarin accurately and comfortably with a good command of the four tones; 2) carry out simple dialogues of familiar topics; 3) recognize and reproduce approximately 600-650 characters; and 4) read short textbook stories and write simple notes In order to develop students' listening and speaking ability, oral communication tasks are given every other week. Course Online: Synchronous Format https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021A&course=CHIN112006
CHIN 142-680 Intermed Cantonese II Yan Huang TR 05:00 PM-06:30 PM A continuation of Intermediate Cantonese I. Intermediate Cantonese is a course for students who are able to communicate in the dialect in basic survival situations. Through this course, the students will acquire a better understanding of Cantonese and its related culture, and can confidently cope with a wide range of situations. Classes will be conducted through Cantonese textbooks, discussions of various topics, and composition and presentation of students' own dialogues so that in time they may express more complex ideas and feelings. Prior Language Experience Required
Crse Online: Sync & Async Components
CHIN 152-680 Intermed Taiwanese II Grace Mei-Hui Wu TR 05:00 PM-06:30 PM This is a continuation of Intermediate Taiwanese I. Students will further develop their speaking and listening skills and will be able to communicate with ease and confidence when dealing with everyday routine tasks. Students will also gain skills to process and seek information in Taiwanese. Conversation topics include the New Year, folk songs and Tang poetry. Authentic materials are used for enhancing reading, listening, and speaking practices. Prior Language Experience Required
Crse Online: Sync & Async Components
CHIN 212-001 Intermed Mod Chinese II Mushi Li MTWR 11:00 AM-12:00 PM This course is the continuation of CHIN 211. It aims to further develop students' overall language skills. The textbook will introduce various topics related to Chinese culture, society, economy, people and their everyday life as well as China's development since Deng Xiaoping's reform and opening-up policies in 1978. In class, current issues in China will be integrated to provide a new perspective for discussion. The emphasis is not only to consolidate students' foundation, but also enhance their understanding and distinguish different levels of language. Over the semester, students will have many opportunities to express and share their opinions on various topics related to China via communicative activities, presentations, and written assignments. Course Online: Synchronous Format https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021A&course=CHIN212001
CHIN 212-002 Intermed Mod Chinese II Ye Tian MTWR 12:00 PM-01:00 PM This course is the continuation of CHIN 211. It aims to further develop students' overall language skills. The textbook will introduce various topics related to Chinese culture, society, economy, people and their everyday life as well as China's development since Deng Xiaoping's reform and opening-up policies in 1978. In class, current issues in China will be integrated to provide a new perspective for discussion. The emphasis is not only to consolidate students' foundation, but also enhance their understanding and distinguish different levels of language. Over the semester, students will have many opportunities to express and share their opinions on various topics related to China via communicative activities, presentations, and written assignments. Course Online: Synchronous Format https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021A&course=CHIN212002
CHIN 212-003 Intermed Mod Chinese II Ye Tian MW 01:00 PM-02:00 PM
TR 01:30 PM-02:30 PM
This course is the continuation of CHIN 211. It aims to further develop students' overall language skills. The textbook will introduce various topics related to Chinese culture, society, economy, people and their everyday life as well as China's development since Deng Xiaoping's reform and opening-up policies in 1978. In class, current issues in China will be integrated to provide a new perspective for discussion. The emphasis is not only to consolidate students' foundation, but also enhance their understanding and distinguish different levels of language. Over the semester, students will have many opportunities to express and share their opinions on various topics related to China via communicative activities, presentations, and written assignments. Course Online: Synchronous Format https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021A&course=CHIN212003
CHIN 232-001 Inter Rdg/Wrtg Chineseii Grace Mei-Hui Wu MW 10:00 AM-12:00 PM This is an intermediate language class presuming basic fluency in speaking and listening and focusing on reading and writing abilities. By the end of the semester students are expected to have mastered the 1200 most commonly used characters and to have the ability to read basic Chinese texts. Students will be prepared for Advanced Modern Chinese, Media Chinese and Business Chinese. Course Online: Synchronous Format https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021A&course=CHIN232001
CHIN 312-001 Advanced Mod Chinese II Jiajia Wang MTWR 12:00 PM-01:00 PM Chin 312 is a continuation of Chinese 311, training speaking, listening, reading and writing skills so to reach the advanced-low or advanced-mid level of proficiency. Major topics of the course include Chinese food culture, Chinese architecture, Confucianism in modern China, "educated youth", democracy, and cross-Taiwan Strait relations. Course Online: Synchronous Format https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021A&course=CHIN312001
CHIN 312-002 Advanced Mod Chinese II Jiajia Wang MTWR 02:00 PM-03:00 PM Chin 312 is a continuation of Chinese 311, training speaking, listening, reading and writing skills so to reach the advanced-low or advanced-mid level of proficiency. Major topics of the course include Chinese food culture, Chinese architecture, Confucianism in modern China, "educated youth", democracy, and cross-Taiwan Strait relations. Course Online: Synchronous Format https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021A&course=CHIN312002
CHIN 372-680 Adv Spoken Mandarin II Ye Tian MW 04:30 PM-06:00 PM Following the format of Advanced Spoken Mandarin I with more discussions on current issues in both China and the US, including topics ranging from race, religion, gender issues to internet, cinema and pop cultures. The objective of this course is to consolidate the knowledge and skills students have acquired from their previous Mandarin Chinese classes and to enhance their oral expressive skills. By the end of the semester, students are expected to be able to carry on a conversation with a native Mandarin speaker on various common topics, and to gather information necessary for conducting oral presentations and speeches. Prior Language Experience Required
Crse Online: Sync & Async Components
https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021A&course=CHIN372680
CHIN 380-680 Advanced Medical Chinese Chih-Jen Lee MR 04:30 PM-06:00 PM Advanced Medical Chinese is a content-based course with curriculum adapted from the online course of New York University School of Medicine (NYUsom). It offers Mandarin training to medical/nursing students and other health professionals who may need to visit China or to serve limited English proficient Chinese-speaking patients. For physician/nurse-patients communication purposes, it is designed for students who have studied Chinese for three years or more in a regular college program or with the equivalent language proficiency and have studied medicine. Offered through the Penn Language Center. Prior Language Experience Required
Crse Online: Sync & Async Components
https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021A&course=CHIN380680
CHIN 382-001 Business Chinese II Ye Tian TR 10:30 AM-12:00 PM This course is the second half of a one-year course for business oriented subjects. This course will provide an overview of China's changing macro-environment, while real business cases let us look into individual Chinese companies and their development in the new millennium. By the end of the semester, students are expected to 1) enhance the cultural awareness of contemporary China and the Chinese business world; 2) gain vocabulary and fluency in Chinese to function more confidently and comfortably in real business settings; 3) access business news and information in Chinese; 4) give business presentation in Chinese. Course Online: Synchronous Format https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021A&course=CHIN382001
CHIN 382-002 Business Chinese II Jiajia Wang MW 03:00 PM-04:30 PM This course is the second half of a one-year course for business oriented subjects. This course will provide an overview of China's changing macro-environment, while real business cases let us look into individual Chinese companies and their development in the new millennium. By the end of the semester, students are expected to 1) enhance the cultural awareness of contemporary China and the Chinese business world; 2) gain vocabulary and fluency in Chinese to function more confidently and comfortably in real business settings; 3) access business news and information in Chinese; 4) give business presentation in Chinese. Course Online: Synchronous Format https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021A&course=CHIN382002
CHIN 382-680 Business Chinese II Jiajia Wang TR 04:30 PM-06:00 PM This course is the second half of a one-year course for business oriented subjects. This course will provide an overview of China's changing macro-environment, while real business cases let us look into individual Chinese companies and their development in the new millennium. By the end of the semester, students are expected to 1) enhance the cultural awareness of contemporary China and the Chinese business world; 2) gain vocabulary and fluency in Chinese to function more confidently and comfortably in real business settings; 3) access business news and information in Chinese; 4) give business presentation in Chinese. Prior Language Experience Required
Crse Online: Sync & Async Components
https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021A&course=CHIN382680
CHIN 412-001 Rdgs Mod Chinese II:Lit Maiheng Shen Dietrich TR 03:00 PM-04:30 PM The main difference between this course and CHIN411 is the reading materials and topics. This course is designed for students who have completed a minimum of three years of college level Mandarin classes or equivalent. This course may be used to fulfill language or elective requirement for Chinese major or minor. The objectives of the course are 1) to help students gain an in-depth, multi-faceted and critical understanding of Chinese people, Chinese society and Chinese culture; 2) to facilitate students acquisition of formal or written language; and 3) to develop students' analytical and critical thinking skills. These objectives are achieved primarily through 1) close reading and discussion of original literary texts by 20th-century Chinese writers; and 2) regular writing exercises. Students will also view several Chinese films that are related to the topics of the reading text. The class is to be conducted exclusively in Chinese. Course Online: Synchronous Format https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021A&course=CHIN412001
CHIN 482-001 Adv Business Chinese II Mien-Hwa Chiang TR 10:30 AM-12:00 PM Chin 482 is a continuation of Chin 481. Following the format of Chin 481, Advanced Business Chinese I, this course covers topics on Eastern and Western management styles, the global financial market, China's financial market reforms, and mergers and acquisitions in China. At the end of the semester, students will submit a business proposal for the final project. Course Online: Synchronous Format https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021A&course=CHIN482001
CHIN 482-680 Adv Business Chinese II Mien-Hwa Chiang MW 04:30 PM-06:00 PM Chin 482 is a continuation of Chin 481. Following the format of Chin 481, Advanced Business Chinese I, this course covers topics on Eastern and Western management styles, the global financial market, China's financial market reforms, and mergers and acquisitions in China. At the end of the semester, students will submit a business proposal for the final project. Prior Language Experience Required
Crse Online: Sync & Async Components
https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021A&course=CHIN482680
CHIN 492-401 1st Yr Classical Chin II Victor H Mair TR 01:30 PM-03:00 PM Continuation of CHIN491 EALC221/621, which is the only prerequisite for this course. Upon completion of Shadick, readings in a wide selection of texts with Chinese commentaries may be taken up. These readings are in part chosen to reflect student interest. This is the second half of a year-long course. Those who enroll must take both semesters. EALC622401, EALC222401 Course Online: Synchronous Format https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021A&course=CHIN492401
CHIN 510-001 Topics Chinese Culture Mien-Hwa Chiang TR 09:00 AM-10:30 AM The objective of this superior level content-based course is to extend and refine students' language and analytical skills while enhancing the appreciation of Chinese culture. The course is for students with native-like competence in Mandarin. Each class will proceed from reading, reflection, and interpretation, to the exchange of ideas. All reading materials are in Chinese with no glossary and all are written by scholars whose expertise are wither in contemporary and traditional culture of China, or in comparative study of Chinese and Western thoughts. Topics include: (1) the shared beliefs and behaviors of Chinese people; (2) traditional values and new values in the technological and business society; (3) how affection and love are manifested in Chinese culture; (4) what influenced the surge of popularity of Chinese wuxia fiction; (5) what it meant to be descendants of Chinese (huayi) living outside China. The class is conducted exclusively in Mandarin Chinese. Course Online: Synchronous Format https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021A&course=CHIN510001
CHIN 722-401 Adv Classical Chinese II Ori Tavor T 09:00 AM-10:30 AM EALC722401 Crse Online: Sync & Async Components
EALC 002-001 Intro To Japanese Civil David Spafford MW 01:00 PM-02:00 PM Survey of the civilization of Japan from prehistoric times to the present. History & Tradition Sector
Cross Cultural Analysis
Course Online: Synchronous Format
Objects-Based Learning Course
Registration also required for Recitation (see below)
https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021A&course=EALC002001
EALC 002-201 Introduction To Japanese Civilization F 11:00 AM-12:00 PM Survey of the civilization of Japan from prehistoric times to the present. Cross Cultural Analysis Course Online: Synchronous Format
Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
EALC 002-202 Introduction To Japanese Civilization F 01:00 PM-02:00 PM Survey of the civilization of Japan from prehistoric times to the present. Cross Cultural Analysis Course Online: Synchronous Format
Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
EALC 002-203 Introduction To Japanese Civilization R 09:00 PM-10:00 PM Survey of the civilization of Japan from prehistoric times to the present. Cross Cultural Analysis Course Online: Synchronous Format
Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
EALC 002-204 Introduction To Japanese Civilization R 11:00 PM-11:50 PM Survey of the civilization of Japan from prehistoric times to the present. Cross Cultural Analysis Course Online: Synchronous Format
Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
EALC 002-789 Introduction To Japanese Civilization Survey of the civilization of Japan from prehistoric times to the present. Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
EALC 003-401 Intro To Korean Civ Dahye Kim MW 11:00 AM-12:00 PM This gateway course surveys the history of Korea from early times to the present. We will study the establishment of various sociopolitical orders and their characteristics alongside major cultural developments. Covered topics include: state formation and dissolution; the role of ideology and how it changes; religious beliefs and values; agriculture, commerce, and industry; changing family relations; responses to Western imperialism; and Korea's increasing presence in the modern world as well as its future prospects. Students will also be introduced to various interpretive approaches in the historiography. HIST098401 History & Tradition Sector
Cross Cultural Analysis
Course Online: Synchronous Format
Registration also required for Recitation (see below)
https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021A&course=EALC003401
EALC 003-402 Introduction To Korean Civilization F 11:00 AM-12:00 PM This gateway course surveys the history of Korea from early times to the present. We will study the establishment of various sociopolitical orders and their characteristics alongside major cultural developments. Covered topics include: state formation and dissolution; the role of ideology and how it changes; religious beliefs and values; agriculture, commerce, and industry; changing family relations; responses to Western imperialism; and Korea's increasing presence in the modern world as well as its future prospects. Students will also be introduced to various interpretive approaches in the historiography. HIST098402 Course Online: Asynchronous Format
Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
EALC 008-401 East Asian Religions Ori Tavor R 10:30 AM-12:00 PM This course will introduce students to the diverse beliefs, ideas, and practices of East Asia's major religious traditions: Buddhism, Confucianism, Daoism, Shinto, Popular Religion, as well as Asian forms of Islam and Christianity. As religious identity in East Asia is often fluid and non-sectarian in nature, there religious traditions will not be investigated in isolation. Instead, the course will adopt a chronological and geographical approach, examining the spread of religious ideas and practices across East Asia and the ensuing results of these encounters. The course will be divided into three units. Unit one will cover the religions of China. We will begin by discussing early Chinese religion and its role in shaping the imperial state before turning to the arrival of Buddhism and its impact in the development of organized Daoism, as well as local religion. In the second unit, we will turn eastward into Korea and Japan. After examining the impact of Confucianism and Buddhism on the religious histories of these two regions, we will proceed to learn about the formation of new schools of Buddhism, as well as the rituals and beliefs associated with Japanese Shinto and Korean Shamanism. The third and final unit will focus on the modern and contemporary periods through an analysis of key themes such as religion and modernity, the global reception and interpretation of East Asian religions, and the relationship between religion and popular culture. The class will be conducted mainly in the form of a lecture, but some sessions will be partially devoted to a discussion of primary sources in translation. The course assignments are designed to evaluate the development of both of these areas. No previous knowledge of East Asian languages is necessary, and all readings will be available in English on the Canvas site in PDF form. RELS172401 Crse Online: Sync & Async Components https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021A&course=EALC008401
EALC 030-401 The Mongol Century Christopher Pratt Atwood F 09:00 AM-10:00 AM This course deals with the empire built by the Mongols in the 13th centurythe largest land empire in the world. Most readings will be from translated primary sources of the 13th and 14th centuries, written by the Mongols themselves and also by Persians, Chinese, Eastern Christians, Europeans, and other peoples that fought, surrendered to, or traded with the Mongol conquerors. The course will explore the Mongols, the most spectacular example of the nomadic conquerors who played such a large role in all Eurasian history, and survey how their empire affected themselves and the peoples they conquered. By using primary sources, the course will also provide a survey of civilizations in Eurasia in the 13th and 14th centuries, and give a hands-on example of how historians build historical knowledge from varied sources. EALC530401 Crse Online: Sync & Async Components
EALC 036-401 Buddhist Literature Justin Mcdaniel TR 12:00 PM-01:30 PM This course seeks to introduce students to the diversity of texts, textual practices, and textual communities in Buddhist Asia. We will look at cosmological, historical, narrative, psychological, grammatical, magical, didactic, and astrological genres to gain an understanding of how Buddhist writers from various places and times have expressed their views on the inner workings of the mind, the nature of action, the illusion of phenomena, the role of the ethical agent, the origin of chaos, the persistence of violence, the contours of the universe, and the way to Enlightenment. RELS273401 Crse Online: Sync & Async Components
EALC 050-301 Anime To Zen Aesthetics Frank L. Chance MW 05:00 PM-06:00 PM Japan has one of the richest and most varied theatrical traditions in the world, and is a veritable museum of classical and contemporary performances practices. This seminar is designed to introduce students to several major aesthetic principles that are embodied in different theatrical genres. The students will be taken deep into several important texts of the performance tradition, as well as to various places on Penn campus and in Philadelphia in order to fully experience these aesthetics: Cross Cultural Analysis Course Online: Synchronous Format
Freshman Seminar
https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021A&course=EALC050301
EALC 071-401 Modern Japanese History Frederick R. Dickinson This course will survey the major political, economic, social and intellectual trends in the making of modern Japan. Special emphasis will be given to the turbulent relationship between state and society from 1800 to the present. HIST091401 History & Tradition Sector
Cross Cultural Analysis
Course Online: Asynchronous Format
Registration also required for Recitation (see below)
https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021A&course=EALC071401
EALC 071-402 Modern Japanese History M 10:00 AM-11:00 AM This course will survey the major political, economic, social and intellectual trends in the making of modern Japan. Special emphasis will be given to the turbulent relationship between state and society from 1800 to the present. HIST091402 Cross Cultural Analysis Course Online: Synchronous Format
Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
EALC 071-403 Modern Japanese History M 10:00 AM-11:00 AM This course will survey the major political, economic, social and intellectual trends in the making of modern Japan. Special emphasis will be given to the turbulent relationship between state and society from 1800 to the present. HIST091403 Cross Cultural Analysis Course Online: Synchronous Format
Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
EALC 071-404 Modern Japanese History CANCELED This course will survey the major political, economic, social and intellectual trends in the making of modern Japan. Special emphasis will be given to the turbulent relationship between state and society from 1800 to the present. HIST091404 Cross Cultural Analysis Course Online: Synchronous Format
Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
EALC 071-405 Modern Japanese History W 10:00 AM-11:00 AM This course will survey the major political, economic, social and intellectual trends in the making of modern Japan. Special emphasis will be given to the turbulent relationship between state and society from 1800 to the present. HIST091405 Cross Cultural Analysis Course Online: Synchronous Format
Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
EALC 071-406 Modern Japanese History CANCELED This course will survey the major political, economic, social and intellectual trends in the making of modern Japan. Special emphasis will be given to the turbulent relationship between state and society from 1800 to the present. HIST091406 Cross Cultural Analysis Course Online: Synchronous Format
Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
EALC 071-407 Modern Japanese History W 10:00 AM-11:00 AM This course will survey the major political, economic, social and intellectual trends in the making of modern Japan. Special emphasis will be given to the turbulent relationship between state and society from 1800 to the present. HIST091407 Cross Cultural Analysis Course Online: Synchronous Format
Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
EALC 106-401 East Asian Cinema MWF 11:00 AM-12:00 PM This survey course introduces students to major trends, genres, directors, and issues in the cinemas of East Asian countries/regions, including Japan, Korea, China, Hong Kong, and Taiwan. Charting key developments over more than a hundred years from the early twentieth century to the present, this course examines films as aesthetic objects, asking questions about film form, narrative, and style. It also pays attention to the evolution of cinema as an institution (e.g. modes of production, circulation, and exhibition) in different cultural and political contexts. Weekly course materials will include both films (primary sources) and analytical readings (secondary sources). By the end of the course, students are expected to gain broad knowledge of East Asian cinema, develop skills of film analysis, and apply these skills to perform historically informed and culturally sensitive analysis of cinema. Prior knowledge of East Asian languages is NOT required. ARTH291401, CIMS291401, EALC506401, ARTH691401 Cross Cultural Analysis Crse Online: Sync & Async Components https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021A&course=EALC106401
EALC 122-401 Chinese Fiction & Drama Zhenzhen Lu F 02:00 PM-04:00 PM This course offers a study of the artistic techniques, characteristics and development of drama of the Ming and Qing periods. The course investigates topics such as features, forms and art of Ming-Qing zaju drama, selected readings in Ming-Qing zaju drama, features, forms and art of chuanqi drama, selected readings in chuanqi drama, etc. The course requirement includes two exams, terms papers, pop quiz, and some possible additional assignments. EALC522401 Arts & Letters Sector
Cross Cultural Analysis
Crse Online: Sync & Async Components https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021A&course=EALC122401
EALC 123-301 Love in China Keren He M 05:00 PM-08:00 PM We all know that love is not easy. But what makes it so complicated? This course examines how the notion of "love" in Chinese culture offers a key for us to understand Chinese emotions, family structure, gender and sexuality, consumer economy, as well as the formation of political identity. Is "love" always defined in light of romantic or intimate relationships? Where can we posit the Chinese ideas of "love" in the English lexicons of passion, desire, and romance? What were considered the (im)proper expressions and behaviors of "love" between sovereigns and subjects, parents and children, husbands and wives? Why did metaphors of "love" often go hand in hand with the aspiration for political engagement and the appreciation of literary talents? How did the concepts of "love" challenge Confucian social and moral hierarchies by bonding individuals as equals, which marked the advent of the modern era? And lastly, in what ways can the transformation of "love" over the two millennia of Chinese cultural history broaden our contemporary perceptions of selfhood, partnership, and community? We will probe into these issues through some of the most essential Chinese literary and cultural texts from the 8th century B.C.E. to the 20th century, examining a variety of genres including poetry, plays, memoirs, and fictional narratives. We will also discuss contemporary media adaptations and visit the Penn Museum, exploring different perspectives to approach textual sources. This course is organized both chronologically and thematically: in each week, we read representative works from a specific historical period. They together illuminate both the paradigm of "love" at a given historical time and the transformation of "love" in Chinese culture in the longue duree. The format of the course contains a mixture of lecture and discussion, with a special focus on developing students' skills of close reading. Course Online: Synchronous Format https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021A&course=EALC123301
EALC 140-301 Orcle Bones To Chin Cl Adam D Smith TR 03:00 PM-04:30 PM China is one of several world regions where writing and literacy emerged independently. This course looks at the evidence for the beginnings and first 1000 years of writing in China, from the earliest records of divinations and gift-giving by the Shang kings, through to the establishment during the Han dynasty of the core of China's literary tradition - the "classical" texts that all subsequent educated East Asians knew. Although no prior knowledge of Chinese language is required, we will look at the functioning and early evolution of the Chinese script, and learn to read simple inscriptions. Longer texts will be read in English translation. These will include commemorative inscriptions on bronzes, and varieties of early specialist or technical writings that were buried in tombs with their owners: literature on medicine, handbooks for lawyers, and models for philosophical debate. The course emphasizes the materiality of these writings - their history as physical objects, and the tombs, buildings, and other archeological contexts in which they are found - and a comparative perspective that sets early literacy in East Asia together with similar and contrasting histories of early literacy in other part of the Ancient World. Course Online: Synchronous Format
EALC 141-401 The History of Private Life in China Si-Yen Fei T 07:00 PM-09:00 PM Topics Vary HIST233401 Course Online: Synchronous Format https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021A&course=EALC141401
EALC 141-402 Postwar, Cold War, Divided Koreas Na Sil Heo R 09:00 AM-10:30 AM Topics Vary HIST233402 Crse Online: Sync & Async Components https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021A&course=EALC141402
EALC 151-401 Contempor Fict/Film-Jpan Ayako Kano R 10:30 AM-12:00 PM This course will explore fiction and film in contemporary Japan, from 1945 to the present. Topics will include literary and cinematic representation of Japan s war experience and post-war reconstruction, negotiation with Japanese classics, confrontation with the state, and changing ideas of gender and sexuality. We will explore these and other questions by analyzing texts of various genres, including film and film scripts, novels, short stories, manga, and academic essays. Class sessions will combine lectures, discussion, audio-visual materials, and creative as well as analytical writing exercises. The course is taught in English, although Japanese materials will be made available upon request. No prior coursework in Japanese literature, culture, or film is required or expected; additional secondary materials will be available for students taking the course at the 600 level. Writers and film directors examined may include: Kawabata Yasunari, Hayashi Fumiko, Abe Kobo, Mishima Yukio, Oe Kenzaburo, Yoshimoto Banana, Ozu Yasujiro, Naruse Mikio, Kurosawa Akira, Imamura Shohei, Koreeda Hirokazu, and Beat Takeshi. COML256401, CIMS151401, GSWS257401, EALC551401 Arts & Letters Sector
Cross Cultural Analysis
Crse Online: Sync & Async Components https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021A&course=EALC151401
EALC 220-401 Tang China & Nara Japan Nancy R S Steinhardt T 07:00 PM-10:00 PM This is a seminar about Tang China and Nara Japan, and Early Heian Japan, Unified Silla Korea, Northeast Asia under Parhae, and Uyghur Inner Asia through their cities, palaces, monasteries, Buddhist art, and painting. We begin by studying material remains of the two best-documented civilizations of East Asian in the seventh-ninth centuries. Using painting, sculpture, ceramics, and architecture of Tang China and Nara Japan, we investigate the validity of the frequent assessment of an international Tang through material remains in China and Japan. We then move to Korea, Mongolia, and Central Asia. Students will have a wide range of topics to work on. They will be encouraged to find comparative topics. This seminar is an opportunity for students to use Chinese, Japanese, or Korean in research papers. There are no exams. Readings will be assigned to the whole group and to individual students for short presentations every week. Undergraduates will write one short and write and present one long paper. EALC620401 Course Online: Synchronous Format https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021A&course=EALC220401
EALC 222-401 1st Yr Classical Chin II Victor H Mair TR 01:30 PM-03:00 PM Continuation of CHIN491 EALC221/621, which is the only prerequisite for this course. Upon completion of Shadick, readings in a wide selection of texts with Chinese commentaries may be taken up. These readings are in part chosen to reflect student interest. This is the second half of a year-long course. Those who enroll must take both semesters. CHIN492401, EALC622401 Course Online: Synchronous Format https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021A&course=EALC222401
EALC 227-401 Chinese Painting Nancy R S Steinhardt MW 10:00 AM-11:00 AM Study of Chinese painting and practice from the earliest pictorial representation through the late twentieth century. Painting styles are analyzed, but themes such as landscape and narrative are considered with regard to larger social, cultural, and historical issues. The class will pay particular attention to the construction of the concepts of the "artist" and "art criticism" and their impact on the field into the present. Visits to study paintings at the University of Pennsylvania Museum and Philadelphia Museum of Art. EALC627401, ARTH217401 Course Online: Synchronous Format
Registration also required for Recitation (see below)
https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021A&course=EALC227401
EALC 227-402 Chinese Painting Bryce Douglas Heatherly F 10:00 AM-11:00 AM Study of Chinese painting and practice from the earliest pictorial representation through the late twentieth century. Painting styles are analyzed, but themes such as landscape and narrative are considered with regard to larger social, cultural, and historical issues. The class will pay particular attention to the construction of the concepts of the "artist" and "art criticism" and their impact on the field into the present. Visits to study paintings at the University of Pennsylvania Museum and Philadelphia Museum of Art. EALC627402, ARTH217402 Course Online: Synchronous Format
Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
EALC 227-403 Chinese Painting Bryce Douglas Heatherly F 11:00 AM-12:00 PM Study of Chinese painting and practice from the earliest pictorial representation through the late twentieth century. Painting styles are analyzed, but themes such as landscape and narrative are considered with regard to larger social, cultural, and historical issues. The class will pay particular attention to the construction of the concepts of the "artist" and "art criticism" and their impact on the field into the present. Visits to study paintings at the University of Pennsylvania Museum and Philadelphia Museum of Art. EALC627403, ARTH217403 Course Online: Synchronous Format
Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
EALC 230-401 Gender Religion & China Hsiao-Wen Cheng R 04:30 PM-07:30 PM This course examines the interrelationship among "gender," "religion," and "China" as conceptual and historical categories. We ask, for example, how gender plays critical and constitutive roles in Chinese religious traditions, how religion can be used both to reinforce and to challenge gender norms, how religious women impact Chinese society and culture, and what the construction of "China" as a cultural identity and as a nation-state has to do with women, gender, and religion. We will also think about what assumptions we have when speaking of gender, religion, and China, and the infinite possibilities when we strive to think beyond. We will read three kinds of materials: (1) scholarship on gender and religion in historical and contemporary China as well as the Chinese-speaking world, (2) scholarship concerning theories and methodology of gender and religious studies not necessarily focused on China, and (3) historical record of religious women in English translation. GSWS234401, GSWS630401, EALC630401, RELS237401, RELS630401 Course Online: Synchronous Format https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021A&course=EALC230401
EALC 242-401 Medicine/Healng in China Hsiao-Wen Cheng TR 12:00 PM-01:30 PM This course explores Chinese medicine and healing culture, its diversity, and its change over time. We will discuss topics including the establishment of canonical medicine, Daoist approaches to healing and longevity, diverse views of the body and disease, the emergence of treatments for women, medical construction of sex difference and imagination of female sexuality, the thriving and decline of female healers, the identity of scholar physicians, the transmission of medical knowledge, domestic and cross-regional drug market, healer-patient relations, and new visions of traditional Chinese medicine in modern China. EALC642401 Course Online: Synchronous Format https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021A&course=EALC242401
EALC 251-401 Rdgs Classical Japanesei Linda H. Chance TR 03:00 PM-04:30 PM Readings in classical texts drawn from the Heian, Kamakura, Muromachi, and Edo periods. Introduction to the different styles of classical Japanese, and to classical Japanese as a whole. EALC651401, JPAN491401 Course Online: Synchronous Format https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021A&course=EALC251401
EALC 253-401 The Politics of Shinto Jolyon Thomas T 05:30 PM-07:00 PM Shinto-derived images and ideas frequently appear in Japanese anime and film, and journalists and academics frequently mobilize the term Shinto as a way of explaining Japan's past or envisioning its future. The environmentalist left champions a green Shinto while Shinto-derived ideas serve as red meat for politicians pandering to Japan's nationalist right. While the influential position Shinto occupies in Japanese sociopolitical life is therefore clear, the term Shinto itself is actually not. Depending on who one asks, Shinto is either the venerable indigenous religion of the Japanese archipelago, the irreducible core of Japanese culture, a tiny subset of Japanese Buddhism, an environmentalist ethic, or some combination of these. This course investigates the multifarious types of Shinto envisioned by these competing interest groups. EALC653401, RELS271401, RELS671401 Crse Online: Sync & Async Components https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021A&course=EALC253401
EALC 256-401 The Tale of Genji Linda H. Chance TR 06:30 PM-07:30 PM "Crowning masterpiece of Japanese literature," "the world's first novel," "fountainhead of Japanese literary and aesthetic culture," "a great soap opera in the vein of Jacqueline Susann." Readers over the centuries have praised the Tale of Genji, the monumental prose tale finished just after the year 1000, in a variety of ways. In this course we will read the latest English translation of Murasaki Shikibu's work. We will watch as Genji loses his mother at a tender age, is cast out of the royal family, and begins a quest to fill the void she left. Along the way, Genji's loyalty to all the women he encounters forges his reputation as the ideal lover. We will consider gender issues in the female author's portrayal of this rake, and question the changing audience, from bored court women to censorious monks, from adoring nationalists to comic book adaptors. Study of the tale requires consideration of poetry, imagery, costume, music, history, religion, theater, political and material culture, all of which will be components of the course. We will also trace the effect of the tale's many motifs, from flora and fauna to murderously jealous spirits, on later literature and conceptions of human emotions. All material is in English translation. There are no prerequisites. GSWS256401, EALC656401 Cross Cultural Analysis Crse Online: Sync & Async Components https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021A&course=EALC256401
EALC 294-001 Intro Classical Mong II Narantsetseg Tseveendulam MW 05:00 PM-07:00 PM Continuation of EALC293/693, which is the only prerequisite for this course. Upon completion of the basic introduction to grammar, spelling rules, and diachronic levels (pre-classical, classical, post-classical), readings in a wide selection of texts with Mongolian commentaries may be taken up. These readings are in part chosen to reflect student interest. This is the second half of a year-long course. Those who enroll should take both semesters. Course Online: Synchronous Format
EALC 442-401 War and the Arts Arthur Waldron R 07:00 PM-09:00 PM HIST412401 Crse Online: Sync & Async Components
EALC 506-401 East Asian Cinema MWF 11:00 AM-12:00 PM This survey course introduces students to major trends, genres, directors, and issues in the cinemas of East Asian countries/regions, including Japan, Korea, China, Hong Kong, and Taiwan. Charting key developments over more than a hundred years from the early twentieth century to the present, this course examines films as aesthetic objects, asking questions about film form, narrative, and style. It also pays attention to the evolution of cinema as an institution (e.g. modes of production, circulation, and exhibition) in different cultural and political contexts. Weekly course materials will include both films (primary sources) and analytical readings (secondary sources). By the end of the course, students are expected to gain broad knowledge of East Asian cinema, develop skills of film analysis, and apply these skills to perform historically informed and culturally sensitive analysis of cinema. Prior knowledge of East Asian languages is NOT required. ARTH291401, CIMS291401, EALC106401, ARTH691401 Cross Cultural Analysis Crse Online: Sync & Async Components https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021A&course=EALC506401
EALC 522-401 Chinese Fiction & Drama Zhenzhen Lu F 02:00 PM-04:00 PM This course explores Romance of Three Kingdoms the most popular classica l novel in East Asia and an important source for understanding Chinese culture, politics, history, and military strategy. We propose to read this work not only as a textbook of Chinese literature and culture, but also as a guidebook for career development and risk assessment. Why didn't t Pangtong have a career as successful as Zhuge Liang? Why did Ma Su volunteer in a project that he is not good at? If Cao Cao, Liu Bei, Sun Quan run for presidency in the U.S., who would you vote for and why? These are some of the questions that we will explore alongside our inquiry into the the historical development of various genres of Chinese fiction. In addition to Romance of Three Kingdoms, this course introduces Sun Tsu's The Art of War and other classical Chinese novels such as Dream of the Red Chamber and Strange Tales from a Chinese Studio, as well as classical literary criticism such as Cao Pi's On the Standard of Literature (Dian lun), Lu Ji's Essays on Literature (Wen lun), and Liu Xie's The Literary Mind and the Carving of Dragons. EALC122401 Arts & Letters Sector
Cross Cultural Analysis
Crse Online: Sync & Async Components https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021A&course=EALC522401
EALC 530-401 The Mongol Century Christopher Pratt Atwood F 09:00 AM-10:00 AM This course deals with the empire built by the Mongols in the 13th century - the largest land empire in the world. Most readings will be from translated primary sources of the 13th and 14th centuries, written by the Mongols themselves and also by Persians, Chinese, Eastern Christians, Europeans, and other peoples that fought, surrendered to, or traded with the Mongol conquerors. The course will explore the Mongols, the most spectacular example of the nomadic conquerors who played such a large role in all Eurasian history, and survey how their empire affected themselves and the peoples they conquered. By using primary sources, the course will also provide a survey of civilizations in Eurasia in the 13th and 14th centuries, and give a hands-on example of how historians build historical knowledge from varied sources. Graduate students will receive training in more advanced source critical methodologies for dealing with these sources and for beginning research in this topic. EALC030401 Crse Online: Sync & Async Components
EALC 551-401 Contempor Fict/Film-Jpan Ayako Kano R 10:30 AM-12:00 PM COML256401, CIMS151401, GSWS257401, EALC151401 Cross Cultural Analysis Undergraduates Need Permission
Crse Online: Sync & Async Components
https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021A&course=EALC551401
EALC 620-401 Tang China & Nara Japan Nancy R S Steinhardt T 07:00 PM-10:00 PM This is a seminar about Tang China and Nara Japan, and Early Heian Japan, Unified Silla Korea, Northeast Asia under Parhae, and Uyghur Inner Asia through their cities, palaces, monasteries, Buddhist art, and painting. We begin by studying material remains of the two best-documented civilizations of East Asian in the seventh-ninth centuries. Using painting, sculpture, ceramics, and architecture of Tang China and Nara Japan, we investigate the validity of the frequent assessment of an international Tang through material remains in China and Japan. We then move to Korea, Mongolia, and Central Asia. Students will have a wide range of topics to work on. They will be encouraged to find comparative topics. This seminar is an opportunity for students to use Chinese, Japanese, or Korean in research papers. There are no exams. Readings will be assigned to the whole group and to individual students for short presentations every week. Graduate students will write and present research papers. EALC220401 Course Online: Synchronous Format https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021A&course=EALC620401
EALC 622-401 1st Yr Classical Chin II Victor H Mair TR 01:30 PM-03:00 PM Continuation of CHIN491 EALC221/621, which is the only prerequisite for this course. Upon completion of Shadick, readings in a wide selection of texts with Chinese commentaries may be taken up. These readings are in part chosen to reflect student interest. This is the second half of a year-long course. Those who enroll must take both semesters. CHIN492401, EALC222401 Course Online: Synchronous Format https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021A&course=EALC622401
EALC 627-401 Chinese Painting Nancy R S Steinhardt MW 10:00 AM-11:00 AM Study of Chinese painting and practice from the earliest pictorial representation through the late twentieth century. Painting styles are analyzed, but themes such as landscape and narrative are considered with regard to larger social, cultural, and historical issues. The class will pay particular attention to the construction of the concepts of the "artist" and "art criticism" and their impact on the field into the present. Visits to study paintings at the University of Pennsylvania Museum and Philadelphia Museum of Art. EALC227401, ARTH217401 Course Online: Synchronous Format
Registration also required for Recitation (see below)
https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021A&course=EALC627401
EALC 627-402 Chinese Painting Bryce Douglas Heatherly F 10:00 AM-11:00 AM Study of Chinese painting and practice from the earliest pictorial representation through the late twentieth century. Painting styles are analyzed, but themes such as landscape and narrative are considered with regard to larger social, cultural, and historical issues. The class will pay particular attention to the construction of the concepts of the "artist" and "art criticism" and their impact on the field into the present. Visits to study paintings at the University of Pennsylvania Museum and Philadelphia Museum of Art. ARTH217402, EALC227402 Course Online: Synchronous Format
Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
EALC 627-403 Chinese Painting Bryce Douglas Heatherly F 11:00 AM-12:00 PM Study of Chinese painting and practice from the earliest pictorial representation through the late twentieth century. Painting styles are analyzed, but themes such as landscape and narrative are considered with regard to larger social, cultural, and historical issues. The class will pay particular attention to the construction of the concepts of the "artist" and "art criticism" and their impact on the field into the present. Visits to study paintings at the University of Pennsylvania Museum and Philadelphia Museum of Art. ARTH217403, EALC227403 Course Online: Synchronous Format
Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
EALC 630-401 Gender Religion & China Hsiao-Wen Cheng R 04:30 PM-07:30 PM This course examines gender in Chinese religious culture from ancient to contemporary times. We will explore topics including the Buddhist accommodation of Chinese family system, Chinese transformation of the bodhisattva Guanyin, female deities in Daoist and popular religious pantheons, writings about religious women, female ghosts and fox spirits in literary imagination and folk tales, and the significance of yin force in Chinese medicine and Daoist alchemy. Through the case of China, we will look at how gender plays critical and constitutive roles in religious traditions, and how religion can be used both to reinforce and to challenge gender norms. GSWS234401, GSWS630401, EALC230401, RELS237401, RELS630401 Course Online: Synchronous Format https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021A&course=EALC630401
EALC 642-401 Medicine/Healng in China Hsiao-Wen Cheng TR 12:00 PM-01:30 PM This course explores Chinese medicine and healing culture, its diversity, and its change over time. We will discuss topics including the establishment of canonical medicine, Daoist approaches to healing and longevity, diverse views of the body and disease, the emergence of treatments for women, medical construction of sex difference and imagination of female sexuality, the thriving and decline of female healers, the identity of scholar physicians, the transmission of medical knowledge, domestic and cross-regional drug market, healer-patient relations, and new visions of traditional Chinese medicine in modern China. EALC242401 Course Online: Synchronous Format https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021A&course=EALC642401
EALC 651-401 Rdgs Classical Japanesei Linda H. Chance TR 03:00 PM-04:30 PM Readings in classical texts drawn from the Heian, Kamakura, Muromachi, and Edo periods. Introduction to the different styles of classical Japanese, and to classical Japanese as a whole. EALC251401, JPAN491401 Course Online: Synchronous Format https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021A&course=EALC651401
EALC 653-401 The Politics of Shinto Jolyon Thomas T 05:30 PM-07:00 PM Shinto-derived images and ideas frequently appear in Japanese anime and film, and journalists and academics frequently mobilize the term Shinto as a way of explaining Japan s past or envisioning its future. The environmentalist left champions a green Shinto while Shinto-derived ideas serve as red meat for politicians pandering to Japan s nationalist right. While the influential position Shinto occupies in Japanese sociopolitical life is therefore clear, the term Shinto itself is actually not. Depending on who one asks, Shinto is either the venerable indigenous religion of the Japanese archipelago, the irreducible core of Japanese culture, a tiny subset of Japanese Buddhism, an oppressive political ideology linked to the emperor system, an environmentalist ethic, or some combination of these. This course investigates the multifarious types of Shinto envisioned by these competing interest groups. EALC253401, RELS271401, RELS671401 Crse Online: Sync & Async Components https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021A&course=EALC653401
EALC 656-401 The Tale of Genji Linda H. Chance TR 06:30 PM-07:30 PM "Crowning masterpiece of Japanese literature," "the world's first novel," "fountainhead of Japanese literary and aesthetic culture," "a great soap opera in the vein of Jacqueline Susann." Readers over the centuries have praised the Tale of Genji, the monumental prose tale finished just after the year 1000, in a variety of ways. In this course we will read the latest English translation of Murasaki Shikibu's work. We will watch as Genji loses his mother at a tender age, is cast out of the royal family, and begins a quest to fill the void she left. Along the way, Genji's loyalty to all the women he encounters forges his reputation as the ideal lover. We will consider gender issues in the female author's portrayal of this rake, and question the changing audience, from bored court women to censorious monks, from adoring nationalists to comic book adaptors. Study of the tale requires consideration of poetry, imagery, costume, music, history, religion, theater, political and material culture, all of which will be components of the course. We will also trace the effect of the tale's many motifs, from flora and fauna to murderously jealous spirits, on later literature and conceptions of human emotions. All material is in English translation. There are no prerequisites. Research in an East Asian language required for graduate credit. EALC256401, GSWS256401 Cross Cultural Analysis Crse Online: Sync & Async Components https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021A&course=EALC656401
EALC 694-001 Intro Classical Mong II Narantsetseg Tseveendulam MW 05:00 PM-07:00 PM Continuation of EALC293/693, which is the only prerequisite for this course. Upon completion of the basic introduction to grammar, spelling rules, and diachronic levels (pre-classical, classical, post-classical), readings in a wide selection of texts with Mongolian commentaries may be taken up. These readings are in part chosen to reflect student interest. This is the second half of a year-long course. Those who enroll should take both semesters. Course Online: Synchronous Format
EALC 720-301 Dunhuangology Victor H Mair W 03:00 PM-06:00 PM Topics vary semester to semester Course Online: Synchronous Format https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021A&course=EALC720301
EALC 722-401 Adv Classical Chinese II Ori Tavor T 09:00 AM-10:30 AM CHIN722401 Crse Online: Sync & Async Components
EALC 740-301 Sinological Methods Brian T Vivier T 07:00 PM-10:00 PM This seminar is designed to acquaint graduate students with the basic methods and resources of Sino logical research. The course will begin with an overview of essential reference works and aids to study, such as dictionaries and concordances, and continue with a survey of the major primary sources for the study of traditional Chinese history. Students are required to demonstrate the use of the methods learned in the course in a research paper, to be presented to the class in the form of a brief lecture at the end of the semester. Only graduate students may enroll in this course. The prerequisites are reading knowledge of modern Chinese and two years of the classical language. Familiarity with Japanese, though not required, would prove helpful. Course Online: Synchronous Format https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021A&course=EALC740301
JPAN 002-680 Intro To Spoken Japan II Lewis E Harrington MW 06:00 PM-08:00 PM Although some reading/writing instruction is given, the major emphasis is on oral communication skill. Prerequisite: See LPS Course Guide. **This course does fulfill the language requirement the College. Course Online: Synchronous Format https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021A&course=JPAN002680
JPAN 012-001 Beginning Japanese II Chihiro Hanami R 10:30 AM-12:00 PM
MW 11:00 AM-12:00 PM
A continuation of Beginning Japanese I, this course continues the introduction of the Japanese language. All four skills, speaking/listening/writing/reading, are equally emphasized. Hiragana/Katakana (Two sets of Japanese syllabic letters) and some Chinese characters (Kanji) are introduced. Textbooks: Genki I (Lesson 8- Lesson 12) and Genki II (Lesson 13- Lesson 14)Kanji: reproduction-approx. 170/recognition-approx.250 Crse Online: Sync & Async Components https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021A&course=JPAN012001
JPAN 012-002 Beginning Japanese II Chihiro Hanami MW 12:00 PM-01:00 PM
R 12:00 PM-01:30 PM
A continuation of Beginning Japanese I, this course continues the introduction of the Japanese language. All four skills, speaking/listening/writing/reading, are equally emphasized. Hiragana/Katakana (Two sets of Japanese syllabic letters) and some Chinese characters (Kanji) are introduced. Textbooks: Genki I (Lesson 8- Lesson 12) and Genki II (Lesson 13- Lesson 14)Kanji: reproduction-approx. 170/recognition-approx.250 Crse Online: Sync & Async Components https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021A&course=JPAN012002
JPAN 012-003 Beginning Japanese II Nana Takeda MW 01:00 PM-02:00 PM
R 01:30 PM-03:00 PM
A continuation of Beginning Japanese I, this course continues the introduction of the Japanese language. All four skills, speaking/listening/writing/reading, are equally emphasized. Hiragana/Katakana (Two sets of Japanese syllabic letters) and some Chinese characters (Kanji) are introduced. Textbooks: Genki I (Lesson 8- Lesson 12) and Genki II (Lesson 13- Lesson 14)Kanji: reproduction-approx. 170/recognition-approx.250 Crse Online: Sync & Async Components https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021A&course=JPAN012003
JPAN 012-004 Beginning Japanese II Chihiro Hanami MW 02:00 PM-03:00 PM
R 03:00 PM-04:30 PM
A continuation of Beginning Japanese I, this course continues the introduction of the Japanese language. All four skills, speaking/listening/writing/reading, are equally emphasized. Hiragana/Katakana (Two sets of Japanese syllabic letters) and some Chinese characters (Kanji) are introduced. Textbooks: Genki I (Lesson 8- Lesson 12) and Genki II (Lesson 13- Lesson 14)Kanji: reproduction-approx. 170/recognition-approx.250 Crse Online: Sync & Async Components https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021A&course=JPAN012004
JPAN 022-001 Inten Beg Japanese II Akiko Takamura Barnes MWF 10:00 AM-12:00 PM A continuation of Intensive Beginning Japanese I, this class is equivalent to Beginning Japanese III and Beginning Japanese IV in one semester, 2CU, and completes the College language requirement. Textbooks: Genki II (Lesson 13- Lesson 23) and Tobira: Gate way to Advanced Japanese (Unit 1-Unit 3) Kanji: Approximately 140 new Kanji will be introduced. Overall Kanji knowledge will be about approx. 400. Crse Online: Sync & Async Components https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021A&course=JPAN022001
JPAN 112-001 Begnning Japanese Iv Nana Takeda MW 11:00 AM-12:00 PM
T 10:30 AM-12:00 PM
Prerequisites: Completion of JPAN 111 or the equivalent This course completes the College language requirement. Textbooks: Genki II (Lesson 22- Lesson 23)and Tobira: Gate way to Advanced Japanese (Unit 1-Unit 3) Kanji: Approximately 140 new Kanji will be introduced. Overall Kanji knowledge will be about approx. 400. Crse Online: Sync & Async Components https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021A&course=JPAN112001
JPAN 112-002 Begnning Japanese Iv Megumu Tamura MW 12:00 PM-01:00 PM
T 12:00 PM-01:30 PM
Prerequisites: Completion of JPAN 111 or the equivalent This course completes the College language requirement. Textbooks: Genki II (Lesson 22- Lesson 23)and Tobira: Gate way to Advanced Japanese (Unit 1-Unit 3) Kanji: Approximately 140 new Kanji will be introduced. Overall Kanji knowledge will be about approx. 400. Crse Online: Sync & Async Components https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021A&course=JPAN112002
JPAN 112-003 Begnning Japanese Iv Megumu Tamura MW 02:00 PM-03:00 PM
T 03:00 PM-04:30 PM
Prerequisites: Completion of JPAN 111 or the equivalent This course completes the College language requirement. Textbooks: Genki II (Lesson 22- Lesson 23)and Tobira: Gate way to Advanced Japanese (Unit 1-Unit 3) Kanji: Approximately 140 new Kanji will be introduced. Overall Kanji knowledge will be about approx. 400. Crse Online: Sync & Async Components https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021A&course=JPAN112003
JPAN 212-001 Intermediate Japanese II Megumu Tamura M 11:00 AM-12:00 PM
TR 10:30 AM-12:00 PM
A continuation of Japanese language at the intermediate level. Textbooks: Tobira: Gateway to Advanced Japanese (Unit 9-Unit 15) Kanji: reproduction-approx.470/recognitio-approx.650 Crse Online: Sync & Async Components https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021A&course=JPAN212001
JPAN 312-001 Intermediate Japanese Iv Tomoko Takami MW 12:00 PM-01:00 PM PREREQUISITES Completion of JPAN 311 or the equivalent. Authentic materials and video clips will be used Crse Online: Sync & Async Components https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021A&course=JPAN312001
JPAN 382-680 Japanese/Professions II Tomoko Takami M 03:30 PM-05:00 PM An intermediate level course of Japanese language focusing on workplace-related topics. Intended for students who will use Japanese in the professions. Textbook: Powering Up Your Japanese through Case Studies: Intermediate and Advanced Japanese. Prerequisite: Offered through the Penn Language Center. Crse Online: Sync & Async Components https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021A&course=JPAN382680
JPAN 412-001 Advanced Japanese II Tomoko Takami M 02:00 PM-03:30 PM A continuation of Japanese language at the advanced level. Authentic materials and video clips will be used. Crse Online: Sync & Async Components https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021A&course=JPAN412001
JPAN 482-680 Advanced Proficiency II Chihiro Hanami MW 03:30 PM-05:00 PM This course is for students with an advanced-low or advanced-mid background in Japanese, aiming to strengthen the four language skills (speaking, reading, writing, and listening) and to deepen their understanding of Japanese culture. The class will use authentic Japanese through media, such as newspapers, television, and articles, regarding Japanese culture and society as well as current news. Students will narrate, describe, and express their opinions with details, examples, and strong reasoning, using sophisticated terms and phrases related such topics. Prerequisite: Japanese proficiency test and permission of instructor. Offered through the Penn Language Center. Course Online: Synchronous Format https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021A&course=JPAN482680
JPAN 491-401 Rdgs Classical Japanesei Linda H. Chance TR 03:00 PM-04:30 PM Readings in classical texts drawn from the Heian, Kamakura, Muromachi, and Edo periods. Introduction to the different styles of classical Japanese, and to classical Japanese as a whole. EALC251401, EALC651401 Course Online: Synchronous Format https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021A&course=JPAN491401
KORN 001-680 1st Yr Spoken Korean I Siwon Lee MW 03:30 PM-04:30 PM This class is for those that have little to no knowledge of Korean. The main focus is the development of Korean communication skills by exploring a variety of everyday topics beyond school settings. Students will improve their Korean communication skills by engaging in a variety of interactive activities, role plays, and presentations. Class topics include, but are not limited to, introducing oneself, describing one's surroundings, discussing daily activities and past events, talking about common objects and people, etc. We will also introduce cultural topics in order to deepen students' understanding of Korea's culture and language. NOTE: This course does not count toward the language requirement or the EALC major or minor. Offered through the Penn Language Center. Crse Online: Sync & Async Components https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021A&course=KORN001680
KORN 012-001 Elementary Korean II Eunae Kim TWR 11:00 AM-12:00 PM This is a continuation of KORN 011. This course aims to further develop the four language skills of students to the novice-high level by building on materials covered in KORN 011. Students will learn how to use three speech styles (polite formal, informal, and intimate) appropriately in a given context. Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to handle simple and elementary needs of daily lives and talk (and write) about a variety of topics such as family, college life, birthday celebration, shopping, Korean food, etc. Crse Online: Sync & Async Components https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021A&course=KORN012001
KORN 012-002 Elementary Korean II Haewon Cho TWR 12:00 PM-01:00 PM This is a continuation of KORN 011. This course aims to further develop the four language skills of students to the novice-high level by building on materials covered in KORN 011. Students will learn how to use three speech styles (polite formal, informal, and intimate) appropriately in a given context. Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to handle simple and elementary needs of daily lives and talk (and write) about a variety of topics such as family, college life, birthday celebration, shopping, Korean food, etc. Crse Online: Sync & Async Components https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021A&course=KORN012002
KORN 012-003 Elementary Korean II Eunae Kim TR 03:00 PM-04:30 PM This is a continuation of KORN 011. This course aims to further develop the four language skills of students to the novice-high level by building on materials covered in KORN 011. Students will learn how to use three speech styles (polite formal, informal, and intimate) appropriately in a given context. Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to handle simple and elementary needs of daily lives and talk (and write) about a variety of topics such as family, college life, birthday celebration, shopping, Korean food, etc. Crse Online: Sync & Async Components https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021A&course=KORN012003
KORN 112-001 Intermediate Korean II Siwon Lee MW 12:00 PM-01:00 PM This is a continuation of Intermediate Korean I. This course is designed to develop students' Korean language proficiency to the intermediate-mid level of the ACTFL Proficiency Guidelines. This course expands student's competence by dealing with more functions in various contexts that students can frequently encounter in everyday interactions. In order to prepare students for social contexts, students are encouraged to engage in conversations by personalizing the topics, functions or contexts. Students will perform in an interpersonal way by providing and obtaining information, expressing feelings and emotions, and exchanging opinions on a variety of topics such as birthday parties, recreation and hobbies, Korean holidays, marriage, cultural differences, education and jobs. This course completes the College language requirement. Crse Online: Sync & Async Components https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021A&course=KORN112001
KORN 112-002 Intermediate Korean II Siwon Lee TR 03:00 PM-04:00 PM This is a continuation of Intermediate Korean I. This course is designed to develop students' Korean language proficiency to the intermediate-mid level of the ACTFL Proficiency Guidelines. This course expands student's competence by dealing with more functions in various contexts that students can frequently encounter in everyday interactions. In order to prepare students for social contexts, students are encouraged to engage in conversations by personalizing the topics, functions or contexts. Students will perform in an interpersonal way by providing and obtaining information, expressing feelings and emotions, and exchanging opinions on a variety of topics such as birthday parties, recreation and hobbies, Korean holidays, marriage, cultural differences, education and jobs. This course completes the College language requirement. Crse Online: Sync & Async Components https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021A&course=KORN112002
KORN 132-001 Korean/Heritge Spkrs II Eunae Kim TR 12:00 PM-01:00 PM This course is a continuation of Korean for Heritage Speakers I, and aims to further develop students' linguistic and cultural competence by building on materials covered in that class. In addition to gaining a deeper understanding of Korean culture, the course focuses on enhancing linguistic accuracy and fluency in both spoken and written Korean. Particular emphasis will be placed on building a meaningful Korean-speaking community, as well as consolidation of grammar structures, and expansion and enhancement of vocabulary. Topics include preparing for a trip to Korea, finding housing, college culture in Korea, entertainment and participating in various social events. Upon completion of this course, students will be able to express themselves more accurately and participate in Korea-related communities more meaningfully. This course completes the College language requirement. Crse Online: Sync & Async Components https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021A&course=KORN132001
KORN 212-001 Advanced Korean II Haewon Cho MW 03:30 PM-04:30 PM This is a continuation of Advanced Korean I. Students continue to develop functional proficiency in Korean at the advanced-low level. The topics include literature, culture, Korean customs, and social issues in contemporary Korea. Crse Online: Sync & Async Components https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021A&course=KORN212001
KORN 332-680 Current Korean Media II Eunae Kim M 03:30 PM-04:30 PM Offered through the Penn Language Center. Current Korean Media II aims at a deeper understanding of the contemporary Korean society, through critical analysis of language use and viewpoints expressed in various types of media including the Internet, TV, films, magazines and newspapers. This course will focus on cultural products and practices such as popular culture, media culture, and entertainment. By catering to the needs and interests of individual learners of Korean, the course will provide them with a rich opportunity to relate what they have learned in previous Korean language courses to the larger context of Korean culture and society. In addition, students will have an in-depth discussion on topics related to Korean society as well as Penn news. This course is conducted entirely in Korean. Crse Online: Sync & Async Components https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021A&course=KORN332680
KORN 381-680 Business Korean I Haewon Cho W 06:30 PM-08:00 PM Offered through the Penn Language Center. Business Korean I is designed for students who want to sharpen their Korean language skills to the advanced-high level by focusing their study on Korean business and economy. Students will learn business/economy-related terminologies and concepts. They will also take an in-depth look at the issues related to business practices and environment in Korea. Students will improve and refine their language skills through actively participating in discussions, research, and presentations. Crse Online: Sync & Async Components https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021A&course=KORN381680
KORN 432-001 Adv Rdgs Mod Korean II Siwon Lee T 07:00 PM-08:30 PM This course allows development of creative and analytical thinking through introduction of more organized thematic topics such as family, human relationships, and the reflection of self-images, and individual's mental status while the society changes in time. Crse Online: Sync & Async Components https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021A&course=KORN432001
KORN 482-680 Adv Business Korean II Hoseok Lee MW 06:30 PM-08:00 PM Offered through the Penn Language Center. A continuation of the material offered in Advanced Business Korean I. Students continue to closely follow the current topics of business and financial markets of Korea by actively participating in discussions, research, and presentations. Course Online: Synchronous Format https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021A&course=KORN482680