Title Instructors Location Time Description Cross listings Fulfills Registration notes Syllabus Syllabus URL
ALAN 0200-001 Elementary Mongolian II Narantsetseg Tseveendulam WILL 844 This class is a continuation of Elementary Mongolian I and will build on the lessons learned in that class. Mongolian is the national language of the independent State of Mongolia and the language of the nomadic warriors Genghis Khan (known to the Mongolians themselves as Chinggis Khan). It is also spoken in China and Siberia. Students will learn the basics of modern Mongolian language, as spoken in Ulaanbaatar "Red Hero," the country's capital. They will learn in the phonetic Cyrillic script, which was adapted to Mongolian language from Russian in 1945, with a few additional letters. Basic grammar will be taught through communicative methodology. Students will also have opportunity to experience Mongolian arts, culture, and cooking in and out of class.
ALAN 0300-001 Intermediate Mongolian I Narantsetseg Tseveendulam WILL 844 Mongolian is the national language of the independent State of Mongolia and the language of the nomadic warriors Genghis Khan (known to the Mongolians themselves as Chinggis Khan). It is also spoken in China and Siberia. Today Mongolian musical styles like throat singing (khoomii), products like cashmere (nooluur), and tourism to visit Mongolia's nomadic herders (malchid) are making a mark on the world stage. In this class the students will continue with the basics of modern Mongolian language, as spoken in Ulaanbaatar "Red Hero," the country's capital. They will learn in the phonetic Cyrillic script, which was adapted to Mongolian language from Russian in 1945, with a few additional letters. Intermediate and more advanced grammar will be taught through communicative methodology. Students will also have opportunity to experience Mongolian arts, culture, and cooking in and out of class. This is the first semester of Intermediate Mongolian. By the end of two semesters intermediate Mongolian, students will have learned all the noun forms, and all the major verb forms and will be able to form complex, multi-clause sentences, telling stories, expressing their feelings, and making arguments and explanations. They should be able to interact in all basic "survival" situations in Mongolia.
CHIN 0200-001 Beginning Chinese II Xiuyuan Mi WILL 705 MTWR 8:30 AM-9:29 AM This course is the continuation of Beginning Chinese I and is the second course of a four-semester sequence. By completing all four semesters, students fulfill the College language requirement.The objective of the course is to help students build a solid foundation of the four basic skills--listening, speaking, reading, and writing-- in an interactive and communicative learning environment. The emphasis is on correct pronunciation, accurate tones and mastery of basic grammatical structures. By the end of the semester, students will be able to manage many situations that have immediate concern to them, such as relating one's personal life and experiences, expressing preferences and feelings, ordering meals, purchasing goods and asking for directions. In order to achieve these goals, students are expected to thoroughly preview and review the materials according to the weekly lesson plan (on course website) prior to attending class. Regular attendance is mandatory and strictly monitored. https://coursesintouch.apps.upenn.edu/cpr/jsp/fast.do?webService=syll&t=202310&c=CHIN0200001
CHIN 0200-002 Beginning Chinese II Jiajia Wang WILL 6 MTWR 10:15 AM-11:14 AM This course is the continuation of Beginning Chinese I and is the second course of a four-semester sequence. By completing all four semesters, students fulfill the College language requirement.The objective of the course is to help students build a solid foundation of the four basic skills--listening, speaking, reading, and writing-- in an interactive and communicative learning environment. The emphasis is on correct pronunciation, accurate tones and mastery of basic grammatical structures. By the end of the semester, students will be able to manage many situations that have immediate concern to them, such as relating one's personal life and experiences, expressing preferences and feelings, ordering meals, purchasing goods and asking for directions. In order to achieve these goals, students are expected to thoroughly preview and review the materials according to the weekly lesson plan (on course website) prior to attending class. Regular attendance is mandatory and strictly monitored.
CHIN 0200-003 Beginning Chinese II Maiheng Shen Dietrich WILL 4 MTWR 12:00 PM-12:59 PM This course is the continuation of Beginning Chinese I and is the second course of a four-semester sequence. By completing all four semesters, students fulfill the College language requirement.The objective of the course is to help students build a solid foundation of the four basic skills--listening, speaking, reading, and writing-- in an interactive and communicative learning environment. The emphasis is on correct pronunciation, accurate tones and mastery of basic grammatical structures. By the end of the semester, students will be able to manage many situations that have immediate concern to them, such as relating one's personal life and experiences, expressing preferences and feelings, ordering meals, purchasing goods and asking for directions. In order to achieve these goals, students are expected to thoroughly preview and review the materials according to the weekly lesson plan (on course website) prior to attending class. Regular attendance is mandatory and strictly monitored.
CHIN 0200-004 Beginning Chinese II Jing Hu WILL 3 MTWR 12:00 PM-12:59 PM This course is the continuation of Beginning Chinese I and is the second course of a four-semester sequence. By completing all four semesters, students fulfill the College language requirement.The objective of the course is to help students build a solid foundation of the four basic skills--listening, speaking, reading, and writing-- in an interactive and communicative learning environment. The emphasis is on correct pronunciation, accurate tones and mastery of basic grammatical structures. By the end of the semester, students will be able to manage many situations that have immediate concern to them, such as relating one's personal life and experiences, expressing preferences and feelings, ordering meals, purchasing goods and asking for directions. In order to achieve these goals, students are expected to thoroughly preview and review the materials according to the weekly lesson plan (on course website) prior to attending class. Regular attendance is mandatory and strictly monitored.
CHIN 0200-005 Beginning Chinese II Maiheng Shen Dietrich WILL 316 MTWR 1:45 PM-2:44 PM This course is the continuation of Beginning Chinese I and is the second course of a four-semester sequence. By completing all four semesters, students fulfill the College language requirement.The objective of the course is to help students build a solid foundation of the four basic skills--listening, speaking, reading, and writing-- in an interactive and communicative learning environment. The emphasis is on correct pronunciation, accurate tones and mastery of basic grammatical structures. By the end of the semester, students will be able to manage many situations that have immediate concern to them, such as relating one's personal life and experiences, expressing preferences and feelings, ordering meals, purchasing goods and asking for directions. In order to achieve these goals, students are expected to thoroughly preview and review the materials according to the weekly lesson plan (on course website) prior to attending class. Regular attendance is mandatory and strictly monitored.
CHIN 0200-006 Beginning Chinese II Jie Ying WILL 633 MTWR 3:30 PM-4:29 PM This course is the continuation of Beginning Chinese I and is the second course of a four-semester sequence. By completing all four semesters, students fulfill the College language requirement.The objective of the course is to help students build a solid foundation of the four basic skills--listening, speaking, reading, and writing-- in an interactive and communicative learning environment. The emphasis is on correct pronunciation, accurate tones and mastery of basic grammatical structures. By the end of the semester, students will be able to manage many situations that have immediate concern to them, such as relating one's personal life and experiences, expressing preferences and feelings, ordering meals, purchasing goods and asking for directions. In order to achieve these goals, students are expected to thoroughly preview and review the materials according to the weekly lesson plan (on course website) prior to attending class. Regular attendance is mandatory and strictly monitored.
CHIN 0205-680 Spoken Chinese II Maiheng Shen Dietrich DRLB 4C6 MW 3:30 PM-5:29 PM A continuation of Spoken Chinese I, this course is to help students develop their listening and speaking skills. The emphasis is on correct pronunciation, accurate tones and mastery of basic grammatical structures. By the end of the semester, students will be able to manage many situations that have immediate concern to them, such as relating one's personal life and experiences, expressing preferences and feelings, ordering meals, purchasing goods, asking for directions. To achieve this goal, the class is to be conducted in Chinese as much as possible. Chinese characters will also be introduced, but will not be the focus of the class.
CHIN 0231-680 Beginning Cantonese II Yan Huang WILL 303 TR 5:15 PM-6:44 PM A continuation of Beginning Cantonese I, this class is a preliminary course for spoken Cantonese. The course provides fundamental aspects of the dialect as experienced in daily life situations and will enable students to communicate in Cantonese for daily life needs, such as making phone calls, making purchases, getting around by various means of transportation, seeing a doctor, being a guest or a host at dinner, talking about the weather, talking about sports and entertainment, etc.
CHIN 0233-680 Beginning Taiwanese II Grace Mei-Hui Wu CANCELED A continuation of Beginning Taiwanese I, this course will cover language training as well as cultural topics including history and political aspects of Taiwan. Conversation topics range from daily conversation to professional and formal situations.
CHIN 0260-680 Beginning Business Chinese II Xiaomeng Zhang WILL 318 MW 7:00 PM-8:59 PM A continuation of Beginning Business Chinese I, this course is for those wishing to improve their language skills in a business setting, as well as an understanding of Chinese social development since 1976. The emphasis is on current business development, correct pronunciation, accurate tones and mastery of basic grammatical structures. The main focus is on speaking and listening, with minimal reading. Upon completion, students are expected to be able to converse and interact with people in a variety of traveling settings and company visits. Topics include meeting people, talking about family, introducing companies, making inquiries and appointments, visiting companies, introducing products, initiating dining invitations and practicing dining etiquette. https://coursesintouch.apps.upenn.edu/cpr/jsp/fast.do?webService=syll&t=202310&c=CHIN0260680
CHIN 0400-001 Intermediate Chinese II Shihui Fan WILL 633 MTWR 8:30 AM-9:29 AM This is the fourth course in a four-semester sequence. By completing all four semesters, students fulfill the College language requirement. The objective of the course is to continue building a solid foundation of the four basic skills--listening, speaking, reading and writing. By the end of this course, students should achieve the following goals: 1) pronounce all the sounds in Mandarin accurately and comfortably with a good command of the four tones; 2) carry out simple dialogues of familiar topics; 3) recognize and reproduce approximately 600-650 characters; and 4) read short textbook stories and write simple notes In order to develop students' listening and speaking ability, oral communication tasks are given every other week. https://coursesintouch.apps.upenn.edu/cpr/jsp/fast.do?webService=syll&t=202310&c=CHIN0400001
CHIN 0400-002 Intermediate Chinese II Xiaomeng Zhang WILL 318 MTWR 10:15 AM-11:14 AM This is the fourth course in a four-semester sequence. By completing all four semesters, students fulfill the College language requirement. The objective of the course is to continue building a solid foundation of the four basic skills--listening, speaking, reading and writing. By the end of this course, students should achieve the following goals: 1) pronounce all the sounds in Mandarin accurately and comfortably with a good command of the four tones; 2) carry out simple dialogues of familiar topics; 3) recognize and reproduce approximately 600-650 characters; and 4) read short textbook stories and write simple notes In order to develop students' listening and speaking ability, oral communication tasks are given every other week. https://coursesintouch.apps.upenn.edu/cpr/jsp/fast.do?webService=syll&t=202310&c=CHIN0400002
CHIN 0400-003 Intermediate Chinese II Xiaomeng Zhang WILL 24 MTWR 12:00 PM-12:59 PM This is the fourth course in a four-semester sequence. By completing all four semesters, students fulfill the College language requirement. The objective of the course is to continue building a solid foundation of the four basic skills--listening, speaking, reading and writing. By the end of this course, students should achieve the following goals: 1) pronounce all the sounds in Mandarin accurately and comfortably with a good command of the four tones; 2) carry out simple dialogues of familiar topics; 3) recognize and reproduce approximately 600-650 characters; and 4) read short textbook stories and write simple notes In order to develop students' listening and speaking ability, oral communication tasks are given every other week. Perm Needed From Department https://coursesintouch.apps.upenn.edu/cpr/jsp/fast.do?webService=syll&t=202310&c=CHIN0400003
CHIN 0400-004 Intermediate Chinese II Xiuyuan Mi WILL 315 MTWR 1:45 PM-2:44 PM This is the fourth course in a four-semester sequence. By completing all four semesters, students fulfill the College language requirement. The objective of the course is to continue building a solid foundation of the four basic skills--listening, speaking, reading and writing. By the end of this course, students should achieve the following goals: 1) pronounce all the sounds in Mandarin accurately and comfortably with a good command of the four tones; 2) carry out simple dialogues of familiar topics; 3) recognize and reproduce approximately 600-650 characters; and 4) read short textbook stories and write simple notes In order to develop students' listening and speaking ability, oral communication tasks are given every other week. https://coursesintouch.apps.upenn.edu/cpr/jsp/fast.do?webService=syll&t=202310&c=CHIN0400004
CHIN 0400-005 Intermediate Chinese II Xiuyuan Mi WILL 2 MTWR 3:30 PM-4:29 PM This is the fourth course in a four-semester sequence. By completing all four semesters, students fulfill the College language requirement. The objective of the course is to continue building a solid foundation of the four basic skills--listening, speaking, reading and writing. By the end of this course, students should achieve the following goals: 1) pronounce all the sounds in Mandarin accurately and comfortably with a good command of the four tones; 2) carry out simple dialogues of familiar topics; 3) recognize and reproduce approximately 600-650 characters; and 4) read short textbook stories and write simple notes In order to develop students' listening and speaking ability, oral communication tasks are given every other week. https://coursesintouch.apps.upenn.edu/cpr/jsp/fast.do?webService=syll&t=202310&c=CHIN0400005
CHIN 0405-680 Spoken Chinese IV Chih-Jen Lee WILL 705 MW 3:30 PM-4:59 PM This course is the continuation of Spoken Chinese III. The primary goal of the course is to improve students' conversational ability in Chinese. By the end of the semester, students will reach the survival level, namely, they can accomplish basic day to day tasks. These tasks include relating one's personal life and experiences, expressing preference, feeling and opinion, ordering a meal, purchasing goods, asking directions, making travel plans, visiting a doctor, attending a social function, etc. Short Chinese movies or television shows will be integrated into the course curriculum. Chinese characters will not be taught.
CHIN 0410-001 Intensive Intermediate Chinese I & II Shihui Fan WILL 2 MTWRF 10:15 AM-11:44 AM Along with Intensive Beginning Chinese I & II, this is the second course of a two-semester sequence. By completing both semesters, students fulfill the College language requirement. This course covers the same material as Intermediate Chinese I & II. The main objective is to help students build a solid foundation of the four basic skills--listening, speaking, reading, and writing. By the end of this course, students should achieve the following goals: 1) pronounce all the sounds in Mandarin Chinese accurately and comfortably with a good command of the 4 tones; 2) carry out basic conversations in daily activities; 3) recognize and reproduce approximately 600-650 characters; and 4) read edited simple stories and write short notes or letters. Grammatical and cultural issues are discussed during lecture hours. Oral communication tasks are given every week. Designed for students who have had limited prior exposure to some form of Chinese (Mandarin or other dialects), but inadequate to advance to the intermediate level. The language practiced in this class will be more formal oral and written style, including more authentic materials reading, listening and viewing. https://coursesintouch.apps.upenn.edu/cpr/jsp/fast.do?webService=syll&t=202310&c=CHIN0410001
CHIN 0420-001 Reading and Writing in Chinese II (for Fluent Speakers) Jie Ying WILL 316 MTWR 10:15 AM-11:14 AM A continuation of Reading/Writing Chinese I, this course is designed for students who can speak Chinese and have reading ability of about 1000 Chinese characters. It is specifically designed for students at the ACTFL intermediate-low reading and writing level. The literacy goal is to master 1000 to 2000 Chinese words and reach the intermediate-mid proficiency level. Reading material covers topics that are meaningful to students not only to increase engagement and confidence in their Chinese reading skills, but also foster students' appreciation and understanding of the Chinese culture.
CHIN 0420-002 Reading and Writing in Chinese II (for Fluent Speakers) Grace Mei-Hui Wu WILL 23 MTWR 12:00 PM-12:59 PM A continuation of Reading/Writing Chinese I, this course is designed for students who can speak Chinese and have reading ability of about 1000 Chinese characters. It is specifically designed for students at the ACTFL intermediate-low reading and writing level. The literacy goal is to master 1000 to 2000 Chinese words and reach the intermediate-mid proficiency level. Reading material covers topics that are meaningful to students not only to increase engagement and confidence in their Chinese reading skills, but also foster students' appreciation and understanding of the Chinese culture.
CHIN 0420-003 Reading and Writing in Chinese II (for Fluent Speakers) Jie Ying WILL 5 MTWR 12:00 PM-12:59 PM A continuation of Reading/Writing Chinese I, this course is designed for students who can speak Chinese and have reading ability of about 1000 Chinese characters. It is specifically designed for students at the ACTFL intermediate-low reading and writing level. The literacy goal is to master 1000 to 2000 Chinese words and reach the intermediate-mid proficiency level. Reading material covers topics that are meaningful to students not only to increase engagement and confidence in their Chinese reading skills, but also foster students' appreciation and understanding of the Chinese culture.
CHIN 0420-004 Reading and Writing in Chinese II (for Fluent Speakers) Grace Mei-Hui Wu WILL 305 MTWR 1:45 PM-2:44 PM A continuation of Reading/Writing Chinese I, this course is designed for students who can speak Chinese and have reading ability of about 1000 Chinese characters. It is specifically designed for students at the ACTFL intermediate-low reading and writing level. The literacy goal is to master 1000 to 2000 Chinese words and reach the intermediate-mid proficiency level. Reading material covers topics that are meaningful to students not only to increase engagement and confidence in their Chinese reading skills, but also foster students' appreciation and understanding of the Chinese culture.
CHIN 0431-680 Intermediate Cantonese II Yan Huang WILL 219 TR 7:00 PM-8:29 PM A continuation of Intermediate Cantonese I. Intermediate Cantonese is a course for students who are able to communicate in the dialect in basic survival situations. Through this course, the students will acquire a better understanding of Cantonese and its related culture, and can confidently cope with a wide range of situations. Classes will be conducted through Cantonese textbooks, discussions of various topics, and composition and presentation of students' own dialogues so that in time they may express more complex ideas and feelings.
CHIN 0600-001 High Intermediate Chinese II Ye Tian WILL 307 MTWR 10:15 AM-11:14 AM This course is the continuation of High Intermediate Chinese I. It aims to further develop students' overall language skills. The textbook will introduce various topics related to Chinese culture, society, economy, people and their everyday life as well as China's development since Deng Xiaoping's reform and opening-up policies in 1978. In class, current issues in China will be integrated to provide a new perspective for discussion. The emphasis is not only to consolidate students' foundation, but also enhance their understanding and distinguish different levels of language. Over the semester, students will have many opportunities to express and share their opinions on various topics related to China via communicative activities, presentations, and written assignments. https://coursesintouch.apps.upenn.edu/cpr/jsp/fast.do?webService=syll&t=202310&c=CHIN0600001
CHIN 0600-002 High Intermediate Chinese II Ye Tian WILL 2 MTWR 12:00 PM-12:59 PM This course is the continuation of High Intermediate Chinese I. It aims to further develop students' overall language skills. The textbook will introduce various topics related to Chinese culture, society, economy, people and their everyday life as well as China's development since Deng Xiaoping's reform and opening-up policies in 1978. In class, current issues in China will be integrated to provide a new perspective for discussion. The emphasis is not only to consolidate students' foundation, but also enhance their understanding and distinguish different levels of language. Over the semester, students will have many opportunities to express and share their opinions on various topics related to China via communicative activities, presentations, and written assignments. https://coursesintouch.apps.upenn.edu/cpr/jsp/fast.do?webService=syll&t=202310&c=CHIN0600002
CHIN 0600-003 High Intermediate Chinese II Jing Hu WILL 24 MTWR 1:45 PM-2:44 PM This course is the continuation of High Intermediate Chinese I. It aims to further develop students' overall language skills. The textbook will introduce various topics related to Chinese culture, society, economy, people and their everyday life as well as China's development since Deng Xiaoping's reform and opening-up policies in 1978. In class, current issues in China will be integrated to provide a new perspective for discussion. The emphasis is not only to consolidate students' foundation, but also enhance their understanding and distinguish different levels of language. Over the semester, students will have many opportunities to express and share their opinions on various topics related to China via communicative activities, presentations, and written assignments.
CHIN 0620-001 Reading and Writing Chinese IV (for Fluent Speakers) Grace Mei-Hui Wu WILL 723 MW 10:15 AM-11:44 AM This is an intermediate language class presuming basic fluency in speaking and listening and focusing on reading and writing abilities. By the end of the semester students are expected to have mastered the 1200 most commonly used characters and to have the ability to read basic Chinese texts. Students will be prepared for Advanced Modern Chinese, Media Chinese and Business Chinese.
CHIN 0800-001 Advanced Chinese II Jiajia Wang WILL 705 MTWR 12:00 PM-12:59 PM A continuation of Advanced Chinese I, this course continues training in speaking, listening, reading and writing skills so as to reach the advanced-low or advanced-mid level of proficiency. Major topics of the course include Chinese food culture, Chinese architecture, Confucianism in modern China, "educated youth", democracy and relations with Taiwan.
CHIN 0800-002 Advanced Chinese II Jiajia Wang WILL 705 MTWR 1:45 PM-2:44 PM A continuation of Advanced Chinese I, this course continues training in speaking, listening, reading and writing skills so as to reach the advanced-low or advanced-mid level of proficiency. Major topics of the course include Chinese food culture, Chinese architecture, Confucianism in modern China, "educated youth", democracy and relations with Taiwan. https://coursesintouch.apps.upenn.edu/cpr/jsp/fast.do?webService=syll&t=202310&c=CHIN0800002
CHIN 0805-680 Advanced Spoken Chinese II Ye Tian WILL 27 MW 3:30 PM-4:59 PM A continuation of Advanced Spoken Chinese I, this class follows the same format, with more discussions on current issues in both China and the US. Examples of topics range from race, religion and gender issues to the internet, cinema and pop cultures. The objective of this course is to consolidate the knowledge and skills students have acquired from their previous Mandarin Chinese classes and to enhance their oral expressive skills. By the end of the semester, students are expected to be able to carry on a conversation with a native Mandarin speaker on various common topics, and to gather information necessary for conducting oral presentations and speeches. https://coursesintouch.apps.upenn.edu/cpr/jsp/fast.do?webService=syll&t=202310&c=CHIN0805680
CHIN 0865-001 Business Chinese II Mien-Hwa Chiang WILL 25 MW 10:15 AM-11:44 AM A continuation of Business Chinese I, this course continues language training for business oriented subjects. This course will provide an overview of China's changing macro-environment, while real business cases let us look into individual Chinese companies and their development in the new millennium. By the end of the semester, students are expected to 1) enhance the cultural awareness of contemporary China and the Chinese business world; 2) gain vocabulary and fluency in Chinese to function more confidently and comfortably in real business settings; 3) access business news and information in Chinese; 4) give business presentation in Chinese.
CHIN 0865-002 Business Chinese II Jing Hu WILL 723 MW 3:30 PM-4:59 PM A continuation of Business Chinese I, this course continues language training for business oriented subjects. This course will provide an overview of China's changing macro-environment, while real business cases let us look into individual Chinese companies and their development in the new millennium. By the end of the semester, students are expected to 1) enhance the cultural awareness of contemporary China and the Chinese business world; 2) gain vocabulary and fluency in Chinese to function more confidently and comfortably in real business settings; 3) access business news and information in Chinese; 4) give business presentation in Chinese.
CHIN 0865-680 Business Chinese II Jiajia Wang WILL 302 TR 3:30 PM-4:59 PM A continuation of Business Chinese I, this course continues language training for business oriented subjects. This course will provide an overview of China's changing macro-environment, while real business cases let us look into individual Chinese companies and their development in the new millennium. By the end of the semester, students are expected to 1) enhance the cultural awareness of contemporary China and the Chinese business world; 2) gain vocabulary and fluency in Chinese to function more confidently and comfortably in real business settings; 3) access business news and information in Chinese; 4) give business presentation in Chinese.
CHIN 0878-680 Advanced Medical Chinese Chih-Jen Lee BENN 140 TR 3:30 PM-4:59 PM Advanced Medical Chinese is a content-based course with curriculum adapted from the online course of New York University School of Medicine (NYUsom). It offers Mandarin training to medical/nursing students and other health professionals who may need to visit China or to serve limited English proficient Chinese-speaking patients. For physician/nurse-patients communication purposes, it is designed for students who have studied Chinese for three years or more in a regular college program or with the equivalent language proficiency and have studied medicine.
CHIN 1045-401 Readings Modern Chinese: Literature II Maiheng Shen Dietrich WILL 219 TR 3:30 PM-4:59 PM This course is structured the same as Readings in Modern Chinese Literature I; however, the reading materials and topics are different. This course is designed for students who have completed a minimum of three years of college level Mandarin classes or equivalent. This course may be used to fulfill the language or elective requirement for the EALC or EAST major or minor in the Chinese concentration. The objectives of the course are 1) to help students gain an in-depth, multi-faceted and critical understanding of the Chinese people, Chinese society and Chinese culture; 2) to facilitate students 'acquisition of formal or written language; and 3) to develop students' analytical and critical thinking skills. These objectives are achieved primarily through 1) close reading and discussion of original literary texts by 20th -century Chinese writers; and 2) regular writing exercises. Students will also view several Chinese films that are related to the topics of the reading text. The class is to be conducted exclusively in Chinese. CHIN6045401
CHIN 1055-401 Introduction to Classical Chinese II Victor H Mair WILL 317 TR 1:45 PM-3:14 PM Continuation of Intro to Classical Chinese I, which is the only prerequisite for this course. Upon completion of Shadick, readings in a wide selection of texts with Chinese commentaries may be taken up. These readings are in part chosen to reflect student interest. This is the second half of a year-long course. Those who enroll must take both semesters. EALC3622401, EALC7622401
CHIN 1065-401 Advanced Business Chinese II Mien-Hwa Chiang WILL 843 TR 12:00 PM-1:29 PM This course is a continuation of Advanced Business Chinese I and follows the same format. Topics include Eastern and Western management styles, the global financial market, China's financial market reforms, and mergers and acquisitions in China. At the end of the semester, students will submit a business proposal for the final project. CHIN5065401 https://coursesintouch.apps.upenn.edu/cpr/jsp/fast.do?webService=syll&t=202310&c=CHIN1065401
CHIN 1140-001 Advanced Readings in Chinese Culture Mien-Hwa Chiang WILL 741 MW 1:45 PM-3:14 PM The objective of this advanced level content-based course is to extend and refine students' language and analytical skills while enhancing an appreciation of Chinese culture. The course is for students with native or near-native competency in Mandarin. Each class will include reading, reflection and interpretation, and the exchange of ideas. All reading materials are in Chinese with no glossary and all are written by scholars whose expertise are either in the contemporary and traditional culture of China, or in comparative study of Chinese and Western thoughts. Topics include: 1) the shared beliefs and behaviors of Chinese people; 2) traditional values and new values in the technological and business society; 3) how affection and love are manifested in Chinese culture; 4) what influenced the surge of popularity of Chinese wuxia fiction; (5) what it means to be descendants of Chinese (huayi) living outside China. The class is conducted exclusively in Mandarin Chinese. CHIN6140401
CHIN 1148-680 Chinese for Specific Purposes: Legal Chinese Mien-Hwa Chiang CANCELED Legal Chinese (CHIN 1148/6148) is a superior-level content-based course providing students with a brief overview of Chinese state laws, legal business cases and the study of legal Chinese terminologies. Through text reading and legal business case discussion, the class engages Penn professional school students and undergraduate social science majors in legal case study, encouraging them to reflect on what they read, as well as giving them the opportunity to experience a course that brings together Chinese legal content and Chinese professional literacy training. The goal of the course is to help students better understand the legal language and content in order to prepare them for specific careers of interest. CHIN6148680
CHIN 5065-401 Advanced Business Chinese II Mien-Hwa Chiang WILL 843 TR 12:00 PM-1:29 PM This course is a continuation of Advanced Business Chinese I and follows the same format. Topics include Eastern and Western management styles, the global financial market, China's financial market reforms, and mergers and acquisitions in China. At the end of the semester, students will submit a business proposal for the final project. CHIN1065401
CHIN 6045-401 Readings Modern Chinese: Literature II Maiheng Shen Dietrich WILL 219 TR 3:30 PM-4:59 PM This course is structured the same as Readings in Modern Chinese Literature I; however, the reading materials and topics are different. This course is designed for students who have completed a minimum of three years of college level Mandarin classes or equivalent. This course may be used to fulfill the language or elective requirement for the EALC or EAST major or minor in the Chinese concentration. The objectives of the course are 1) to help students gain an in-depth, multi-faceted and critical understanding of the Chinese people, Chinese society and Chinese culture; 2) to facilitate students 'acquisition of formal or written language; and 3) to develop students' analytical and critical thinking skills. These objectives are achieved primarily through 1) close reading and discussion of original literary texts by 20th -century Chinese writers; and 2) regular writing exercises. Students will also view several Chinese films that are related to the topics of the reading text. The class is to be conducted exclusively in Chinese. CHIN1045401
CHIN 6140-401 Advanced Readings in Chinese Culture Mien-Hwa Chiang WILL 741 MW 1:45 PM-3:14 PM The objective of this advanced level content-based course is to extend and refine students' language and analytical skills while enhancing an appreciation of Chinese culture. The course is for students with native or near-native competency in Mandarin. Each class will include reading, reflection and interpretation, and the exchange of ideas. All reading materials are in Chinese with no glossary and all are written by scholars whose expertise are either in the contemporary and traditional culture of China, or in comparative study of Chinese and Western thoughts. Topics include: 1) the shared beliefs and behaviors of Chinese people; 2) traditional values and new values in the technological and business society; 3) how affection and love are manifested in Chinese culture; 4) what influenced the surge of popularity of Chinese wuxia fiction; (5) what it means to be descendants of Chinese (huayi) living outside China. The class is conducted exclusively in Mandarin Chinese. CHIN1140001
CHIN 6148-680 Chinese for Specific Purposes: Legal Chinese Mien-Hwa Chiang CANCELED Legal Chinese (CHIN 1148/6148) is a superior-level content-based course providing students with a brief overview of Chinese state laws, legal business cases and the study of legal Chinese terminologies. Through text reading and legal business case discussion, the class engages Penn professional school students and undergraduate social science majors in legal case study, encouraging them to reflect on what they read, as well as giving them the opportunity to experience a course that brings together Chinese legal content and Chinese professional literacy training. The goal of the course is to help students better understand the legal language and content in order to prepare them for specific careers of interest. CHIN1148680
CHIN 8622-401 Advanced Classical Chinese II Ori Tavor WILL 723 F 1:45 PM-4:44 PM Close reading and interpretation of texts in various styles of classical Chinese drawn from the Han, Wei, Tang, and Song periods. Focus on strengthening students' reading ability in classical Chinese. Attention to questions of style, rhetoric, and syntax. It is preferred, but not required, that students take Advanced Classical Chinese I first. EALC8622401
EALC 0040-001 Introduction to Japanese Civilization David Spafford STNH AUD MW 1:45 PM-2:44 PM Survey of the civilization of Japan from prehistoric times to the present. Cross Cultural Analysis
History & Tradition Sector
EALC 0040-201 Introduction to Japanese Civilization Mo Zhang WILL 201 F 10:15 AM-11:14 AM Survey of the civilization of Japan from prehistoric times to the present. Cross Cultural Analysis
History & Tradition Sector
EALC 0040-202 Introduction to Japanese Civilization Alice Liu WILL 27 F 12:00 PM-12:59 PM Survey of the civilization of Japan from prehistoric times to the present. History & Tradition Sector
Cross Cultural Analysis
EALC 0040-203 Introduction to Japanese Civilization Mo Zhang WILL 220 F 1:45 PM-2:44 PM Survey of the civilization of Japan from prehistoric times to the present. Cross Cultural Analysis
History & Tradition Sector
EALC 0040-789 Introduction to Japanese Civilization Survey of the civilization of Japan from prehistoric times to the present. Cross Cultural Analysis
History & Tradition Sector
EALC 0060-201 Introduction to Korean Civilization Qiu Jun Oscar Zheng WILL 25 F 10:15 AM-11:14 AM What is Korean civilization—is it a singular notion, or are there many that became what we know as South and North Korea today? How have Koreans interpreted and represented their own cultures, traditions, and history through the years? This introductory course offers a broad chronological survey of Korean history, arts, and culture from its early days to the present moment. Our readings will include a selection of literature—from foundation myths, poetry, to modern fiction—as well as royal edicts and political manifestoes and op-eds. Alongside the readings, we will also engage with multimedia resources including various artwork, film, and music. Through these cultural texts, we will explore the political, economic, and social order of different historical eras and identify major currents and events on the Korean peninsula such as shifting political climates, class struggles, gender dynamics, and complex relations with its East Asian neighbors and the West. We will also be treated to guest lectures from the interdisciplinary Korean studies scholars affiliated with the James Joo-Jin Kim Center for Korean Studies at Penn. By the end of the semester, students will become familiar with the many continuities and breaks that constitute Korean culture from ancient to modern times and gain good insight into where it might be headed in the future. No prior knowledge of Korea or the Korean language is required. HIST0860201 History & Tradition Sector
Cross Cultural Analysis
EALC 0060-202 Introduction to Korean Civilization Stephen Garrett WILL 214 F 12:00 PM-12:59 PM What is Korean civilization—is it a singular notion, or are there many that became what we know as South and North Korea today? How have Koreans interpreted and represented their own cultures, traditions, and history through the years? This introductory course offers a broad chronological survey of Korean history, arts, and culture from its early days to the present moment. Our readings will include a selection of literature—from foundation myths, poetry, to modern fiction—as well as royal edicts and political manifestoes and op-eds. Alongside the readings, we will also engage with multimedia resources including various artwork, film, and music. Through these cultural texts, we will explore the political, economic, and social order of different historical eras and identify major currents and events on the Korean peninsula such as shifting political climates, class struggles, gender dynamics, and complex relations with its East Asian neighbors and the West. We will also be treated to guest lectures from the interdisciplinary Korean studies scholars affiliated with the James Joo-Jin Kim Center for Korean Studies at Penn. By the end of the semester, students will become familiar with the many continuities and breaks that constitute Korean culture from ancient to modern times and gain good insight into where it might be headed in the future. No prior knowledge of Korea or the Korean language is required. HIST0860202 Cross Cultural Analysis
History & Tradition Sector
EALC 0060-401 Introduction to Korean Civilization So-Rim Lee ANNS 111 MW 1:45 PM-2:44 PM What is Korean civilization—is it a singular notion, or are there many that became what we know as South and North Korea today? How have Koreans interpreted and represented their own cultures, traditions, and history through the years? This introductory course offers a broad chronological survey of Korean history, arts, and culture from its early days to the present moment. Our readings will include a selection of literature—from foundation myths, poetry, to modern fiction—as well as royal edicts and political manifestoes and op-eds. Alongside the readings, we will also engage with multimedia resources including various artwork, film, and music. Through these cultural texts, we will explore the political, economic, and social order of different historical eras and identify major currents and events on the Korean peninsula such as shifting political climates, class struggles, gender dynamics, and complex relations with its East Asian neighbors and the West. We will also be treated to guest lectures from the interdisciplinary Korean studies scholars affiliated with the James Joo-Jin Kim Center for Korean Studies at Penn. By the end of the semester, students will become familiar with the many continuities and breaks that constitute Korean culture from ancient to modern times and gain good insight into where it might be headed in the future. No prior knowledge of Korea or the Korean language is required. HIST0860401 Cross Cultural Analysis
History & Tradition Sector
EALC 0730-601 History of Modern China Yi Ren WILL 421 T 5:15 PM-8:14 PM From an empire to a republic, from communism to socialist-style capitalism, few countries have ever witnessed so much change in a hundred year period as China during the twentieth century. How are we to make sense out of this seeming chaos? This course will offer an overview of the upheavals that China has experienced from the late Qing to the Post-Mao era, interspersed with personal perspectives revealed in primary source readings such as memoirs, novels, and oral accounts. We will start with an analysis of the painful transition from the last empire, the Qing Dynasty (1644-1911), to a modern nation state, followed by exploration of a century-long tale of incessant reform and revolution. The survey will focus on three main themes: 1) the repositioning of China in the new East Asian and world orders; 2) the emergence of a modern Chinese state and nationalistic identity shaped and reshaped by a series of cultural crises; and finally, 3) the development and transformation of Chinese modernity. Major historical developments include: the Opium War and drug trade in the age of imperialism, reform and revolution, the Nationalist regime, Mao's China, the Cultural Revolution, and the ongoing efforts of post-Mao China to move beyond Communism. We will conclude with a critical review of the concept of "Greater China" that takes into account Taiwan, Hong Kong, and the Chinese diaspora in order to attain a more comprehensive understanding of modern China, however defined, at the end of the last century. HIST0550601 History & Tradition Sector
Cross Cultural Analysis
https://coursesintouch.apps.upenn.edu/cpr/jsp/fast.do?webService=syll&t=202310&c=EALC0730001
EALC 0750-401 Modern Japanese History Frederick R Dickinson
Zhaoyuan Yu
MCNB 286-7 MW 12:00 PM-12:59 PM This course will survey the major political, economic, social and intellectual trends in the making of modern Japan. Special emphasis will be given to the turbulent relationship between state and society from 1800 to the present. HIST0560401 Cross Cultural Analysis
History & Tradition Sector
https://coursesintouch.apps.upenn.edu/cpr/jsp/fast.do?webService=syll&t=202310&c=EALC0750401
EALC 0750-402 Modern Japanese History Frederick R Dickinson
Zhaoyuan Yu
WILL 2 F 12:00 PM-12:59 PM This course will survey the major political, economic, social and intellectual trends in the making of modern Japan. Special emphasis will be given to the turbulent relationship between state and society from 1800 to the present. HIST0560402 Cross Cultural Analysis
History & Tradition Sector
EALC 0750-403 Modern Japanese History Frederick R Dickinson
Zhaoyuan Yu
WILL 214 F 1:45 PM-2:44 PM This course will survey the major political, economic, social and intellectual trends in the making of modern Japan. Special emphasis will be given to the turbulent relationship between state and society from 1800 to the present. HIST0560403 History & Tradition Sector
Cross Cultural Analysis
EALC 0750-404 Modern Japanese History Frederick R Dickinson
Zhaoyuan Yu
WILL 843 R 5:15 PM-6:14 PM This course will survey the major political, economic, social and intellectual trends in the making of modern Japan. Special emphasis will be given to the turbulent relationship between state and society from 1800 to the present. HIST0560404 History & Tradition Sector
Cross Cultural Analysis
EALC 0750-405 Modern Japanese History CANCELED This course will survey the major political, economic, social and intellectual trends in the making of modern Japan. Special emphasis will be given to the turbulent relationship between state and society from 1800 to the present. HIST0560405 Cross Cultural Analysis
History & Tradition Sector
EALC 0750-406 Modern Japanese History CANCELED This course will survey the major political, economic, social and intellectual trends in the making of modern Japan. Special emphasis will be given to the turbulent relationship between state and society from 1800 to the present. HIST0560406 Cross Cultural Analysis
History & Tradition Sector
EALC 0750-407 Modern Japanese History CANCELED This course will survey the major political, economic, social and intellectual trends in the making of modern Japan. Special emphasis will be given to the turbulent relationship between state and society from 1800 to the present. HIST0560407 History & Tradition Sector
Cross Cultural Analysis
EALC 0954-301 Sushi & Ramen: Making Japanese Food Global Linda H Chance BENN 406 MW 3:30 PM-4:59 PM Who defines Japanese food? Is it the chef at a top establishment in Tokyo, a home cook in Osaka, a tea master in Kyoto, the ancient capital? Or is it the midwestern American who thinks sushi means raw fish? Is it the person who scarfs cup noodles, or the devotee of artisan ramen stock? Perhaps it is the Japanese government, which in 2006 sent undercover agents abroad to guard against inferior Japanese food outlets. In this class we will consider how Japanese food came to be defined in distinction to Western and Chinese foods beginning in the nineteenth century, and how Japanese food became a global cuisine. Among our questions: What makes a dish Japanese? How did Portuguese or Spanish frying habits (tempura) and Chinese lamian (ramen) become hallmarks? How traditional is the diet of rice and fish, and in what ways does it interact with the environment? How did Buddhist vegetarians justify sukiyaki? What relationship does food have to the longevity of Japanese today? How does gender affect Japanese food cultures? What are the origins of Iron Chef and bento? We will survey the Philadelphia Japanese food scene and learn to make our own sushi. Some controversies we will discuss include the consumption of whale meat in Japan. We will also investigate Japanese government controls of food to combat obesity and to make food safe. after the Fukushima nuclear catastrophe. Materials include essays, films, novellas, menus, and cookbooks. Cross Cultural Analysis https://coursesintouch.apps.upenn.edu/cpr/jsp/fast.do?webService=syll&t=202310&c=EALC0954301
EALC 1116-401 East Asian Cinema Chenshu Zhou ANNS 109 MW 3:30 PM-4:29 PM This survey course introduces students to major trends, genres, directors, and issues in the cinemas of East Asian countries/regions, including Japan, Korea, China, Hong Kong, and Taiwan. Charting key developments over more than a hundred years from the early twentieth century to the present, this course examines films as aesthetic objects, asking questions about film form, narrative, and style. It also pays attention to the evolution of cinema as an institution (e.g. modes of production, circulation, and exhibition) in different cultural and political contexts. Weekly course materials will include both films (primary sources) and analytical readings (secondary sources). By the end of the course, students are expected to gain broad knowledge of East Asian cinema, develop skills of film analysis, and apply these skills to perform historically informed and culturally sensitive analysis of cinema. Prior knowledge of East Asian languages is NOT required. ARTH2910401, CIMS2910401
EALC 1116-402 East Asian Cinema Yoonbin Cho
Chenshu Zhou
WILL 723 R 10:15 AM-11:14 AM This survey course introduces students to major trends, genres, directors, and issues in the cinemas of East Asian countries/regions, including Japan, Korea, China, Hong Kong, and Taiwan. Charting key developments over more than a hundred years from the early twentieth century to the present, this course examines films as aesthetic objects, asking questions about film form, narrative, and style. It also pays attention to the evolution of cinema as an institution (e.g. modes of production, circulation, and exhibition) in different cultural and political contexts. Weekly course materials will include both films (primary sources) and analytical readings (secondary sources). By the end of the course, students are expected to gain broad knowledge of East Asian cinema, develop skills of film analysis, and apply these skills to perform historically informed and culturally sensitive analysis of cinema. Prior knowledge of East Asian languages is NOT required. ARTH2910402, CIMS2910402
EALC 1116-403 East Asian Cinema Yoonbin Cho
Chenshu Zhou
BENN 25 R 1:45 PM-2:44 PM This survey course introduces students to major trends, genres, directors, and issues in the cinemas of East Asian countries/regions, including Japan, Korea, China, Hong Kong, and Taiwan. Charting key developments over more than a hundred years from the early twentieth century to the present, this course examines films as aesthetic objects, asking questions about film form, narrative, and style. It also pays attention to the evolution of cinema as an institution (e.g. modes of production, circulation, and exhibition) in different cultural and political contexts. Weekly course materials will include both films (primary sources) and analytical readings (secondary sources). By the end of the course, students are expected to gain broad knowledge of East Asian cinema, develop skills of film analysis, and apply these skills to perform historically informed and culturally sensitive analysis of cinema. Prior knowledge of East Asian languages is NOT required. ARTH2910403, CIMS2910403
EALC 1116-404 East Asian Cinema Maria Puzyreva
Chenshu Zhou
CANCELED This survey course introduces students to major trends, genres, directors, and issues in the cinemas of East Asian countries/regions, including Japan, Korea, China, Hong Kong, and Taiwan. Charting key developments over more than a hundred years from the early twentieth century to the present, this course examines films as aesthetic objects, asking questions about film form, narrative, and style. It also pays attention to the evolution of cinema as an institution (e.g. modes of production, circulation, and exhibition) in different cultural and political contexts. Weekly course materials will include both films (primary sources) and analytical readings (secondary sources). By the end of the course, students are expected to gain broad knowledge of East Asian cinema, develop skills of film analysis, and apply these skills to perform historically informed and culturally sensitive analysis of cinema. Prior knowledge of East Asian languages is NOT required. ARTH2910404, CIMS2910404
EALC 1116-405 East Asian Cinema Maria Puzyreva
Chenshu Zhou
BENN 322 F 12:00 PM-12:59 PM This survey course introduces students to major trends, genres, directors, and issues in the cinemas of East Asian countries/regions, including Japan, Korea, China, Hong Kong, and Taiwan. Charting key developments over more than a hundred years from the early twentieth century to the present, this course examines films as aesthetic objects, asking questions about film form, narrative, and style. It also pays attention to the evolution of cinema as an institution (e.g. modes of production, circulation, and exhibition) in different cultural and political contexts. Weekly course materials will include both films (primary sources) and analytical readings (secondary sources). By the end of the course, students are expected to gain broad knowledge of East Asian cinema, develop skills of film analysis, and apply these skills to perform historically informed and culturally sensitive analysis of cinema. Prior knowledge of East Asian languages is NOT required. ARTH2910405, CIMS2910405
EALC 1180-401 Archaeology of Central Asia Nancy R S Steinhardt WILL 201 W 1:45 PM-4:44 PM A site by site investigation of Buddhist and non-Buddhist ruins in Central Asia. Included are Nisa, Khwarezm, Pyandzhikent, Khalchayan, Ay-Khanum, Bamiyan, Miran, Tumshuk, Kizil, Kucha, Khotan, Adzhina-Tepe, Khocho, Khara-Khoto, and Bezeklik. EALC7180401 Cross Cultural Analysis
EALC 1242-401 Love and Loss in Japanese Literary Traditions: In Translation Linda H Chance WILL 723 TR 3:30 PM-4:59 PM How do people make sense of the multiple experiences that the simple words "love" and "loss" imply? How do they express their thoughts and feelings to one another? In this course, we will explore some means Japanese culture has found to grapple with these events and sensations. We will also see how these culturally sanctioned frameworks have shaped the ways Japanese view love and loss. Our materials will sample the literary tradition of Japan from earliest times to the early modern and even modern periods. Close readings of a diverse group of texts, including poetry, narrative, theater, and the related arts of calligraphy, painting, and music will structure our inquiry. The class will take an expedition to nearby Woodlands Cemetery to experience poetry in nature. By the end of the course, you should be able to appreciate texts that differ slightly in their value systems, linguistic expressions, and aesthetic sensibilities from those that you may already know. Among the available project work that you may select, if you have basic Japanese, is learning to read a literary manga. All shared class material is in English translation. EALC5242401, GSWS1242401 Cross Cultural Analysis
Arts & Letters Sector
https://coursesintouch.apps.upenn.edu/cpr/jsp/fast.do?webService=syll&t=202310&c=EALC1242401
EALC 1251-001 Tokyo Stories in Contemporary Japanese Fiction Kathryn Hemmann WILL 304 TR 1:45 PM-3:14 PM Tokyo is one of the largest and most vibrant cities in the world. It's also one of the most storied, laying claim to centuries of history and countless colorful districts and neighborhoods. In this class we will explore Tokyo by delving into a collection of stories set in and around the great metropolis. We will work our way forward in time, beginning from the city's roots as the samurai capital of Edo. Along the way, we will investigate contemporary themes such as demographic crisis, social stratification, gender trouble, and the ruins of neoliberal capitalism. By the end of the semester, students will have been exposed to a diverse range of representative authors and cultural concerns that will help them develop a nuanced understanding of Japanese history and society. Cross Cultural Analysis https://coursesintouch.apps.upenn.edu/cpr/jsp/fast.do?webService=syll&t=202310&c=EALC1251001
EALC 1271-401 Labor and Literature in Modern Korea: Remaking Ecologies on the Peninsula Vanessa Baker WILL 307 TR 3:30 PM-4:59 PM Contemporary newspapers are packed with articles about the devastating effects of climate change and industrial pollution. This course explores what short stories and novels written in twentieth century Korea have to say about the changing ecology of the peninsula. More specifically, how do laboring bodies contribute to, and also, resist the creation of unsustainable local ecologies? The fiction we read is primarily concerned with how gendered bodies labor with the land in response to the contemporaneous socio-political climate including colonialcapitalism, national division, industrialization, authoritarianism, democracy, and neoliberalism.
We will read works that capture the everyday experience of laborers, gendered violence, and the ecological repercussions of nation-building projects through the lens of modern Korean literature. Throughout the course, students will develop their critical thinking skills in speaking and writing about the ecological, ethical, and political implications of literature. This course is interdisciplinary and encourages students to incorporate methodologies from their own fields of expertise and apply them to the class assignments. Materials are all in English and no prerequisite is necessary to enroll.
COML1271401
EALC 1371-401 New Korean Cinema So-Rim Lee PWH 108 T 10:15 AM-1:14 PM In 2019, Bong Joon-ho's Parasite won the Palme d'Or at the 72nd Cannes Film Festival. This event marked the apex of South Korean cinematic renaissance, having steadily become a tour de force in the international film festival scene since 1997 onwards. This course explores the major auteurs, styles, themes, and currents of the so-called "New Korean Cinema" that emerged in the mid-to-late 1990s to continue to this day. Drawing from texts on critical film and Korean studies, we will pay particular attention to how the selected works re-present, resist, and interweave the sociopolitical climate they concern and are born out of. Using cinema as a lens with which to see the society, we will touch upon major events of the twentieth century including national division, military dictatorship and democratization movements, IMF economic crisis, youth culture, hallyu (the Korean wave), and more. In so doing, we will closely examine how each cinematic medium addresses the societal power structure and the role of the "Other" it represents in terms of class, race, gender, and sexuality in the construction of contemporary Korean society. No prior experience of Korean studies courses necessary; all films will be screened with English subtitles. CIMS1371401, CIMS6371401, EALC6371401
EALC 1411-401 Queer Chinas: Sexuality and Politics in the Sinophone World Teemu Ruskola WILL 216 T 3:30 PM-6:29 PM This class examines queer phenomena in and around China, including Taiwan, Hong Kong, Singapore, and the queer Sinophone world more generally. Beyond seeking to understand sexual subcultures and sites of queer intimacies on their own terms, the course examines their relationship to political economy and geopolitics. In addition to filmic and literary texts, the course includes readings that are theoretical, anthropological, sociological, and comparative. While the focus is largely on modern China, the class also attends to historical reference points both inside and outside the Sinophone world. From a macro perspective, this course examines China’s place in discourses of development, focusing on the role of desire in constituting the sexual and political subject of modernity. The overall goal of this class is to develop alternative frameworks for understanding the relationship between sexuality and politics. The course does not require specialized knowledge of China. GSWS1411401
EALC 1508-401 Religion, State, and Society in East Asia Ori Tavor MCNB 309 TR 10:15 AM-11:44 AM This course examines the relationship between religious institutions and the state in East Asia. Focusing on China and Japan, we will learn about the impact of religious ideas, practices, and organizations on social, political and economic processes and inspect the role of religion in the consolidation of individual, communal, and national identity. Adopting a comparative and transnational approach, we will examine the impact of Asian religious traditions: Confucianism, Daoism, Buddhism, and Shinto, as well as global religions such as Islam and Christianity, on the states and their role in shaping power relations on the international level. RELS1508401 Cross Cultural Analysis https://coursesintouch.apps.upenn.edu/cpr/jsp/fast.do?webService=syll&t=202310&c=EALC1508401
EALC 1702-401 East Asian Environments Wenjiao Cai CANCELED Home to vibrant economies and societies, East Asia is undergoing profound environmental transformations. These developments, crucial for understanding the crises of our time, have deep roots in the past. This seminar course investigates key topics in East Asian environmental history over the last three millennia as we think about the region’s role in the global ecological future.
Focusing on China, Korea, and Japan, we will explore not only how East Asian societies shaped and were shaped by the natural world they inhabited, but also how an environmental perspective helps us view issues such as economic development, ethnicity, state-building, urbanization, and colonialism in a new light. In examining narratives of ecological change in East Asia, we will gain a deeper understanding of the region and the role of the environment in history and historiography.
HIST0852401
EALC 1746-401 Japan: The Age of the Samurai David Spafford WILL 29 MW 10:15 AM-11:44 AM Who (or what) where the samurai? What does it mean to say that Japan had an "Age of the Samurai"? In popular imagination, pre-modern Japan has long been associated with its hereditary warrior class. Countless movies have explored the character and martial prowess of these men. Yet warriors constituted but a tiny portion of the societies they inhabited and ruled, and historians researching medieval Japan have turned their attentions to a great range of subjects and to other classes (elite and commoner alike). This class is designed to acquaint students with the complex and diverse centuries that have been called the "Age of the Samurai"-roughly, the years between ca. 1110 and 1850. In the course of the semester, we will explore the central themes in the historiography of warrior society, while introducing some of the defining texts that have shaped our imagination of this age (from laws to epic poems, from codes of conduct to autobiographies). EALC5746401, HIST0751401 Cross Cultural Analysis
EALC 1759-401 Current Issues in Contemporary Japan Kenji Ishida MCNB 395 T 12:00 PM-2:59 PM In this course, we aim to understand what social issues in Japanese society exist and how
they occur. Japan had experienced rapid industrial and economic developments until the 1980s. The Japanese systems of education, labor markets, and social security, which have continued until today, were established by this period approximately. Although people at that time were suffered from problems like harsh entrance examinations for secondary and higher educations, long working hours after they started a job, and gender inequality, they accepted these problems in exchange for their economic flourishment.
SOCI2700401, SOCI5690401
EALC 1780-401 The Mongol Century Christopher Pratt Atwood WILL 723 TR 12:00 PM-1:29 PM This course deals with the empire built by the Mongols in the 13th centurythe largest land empire in the world. Most readings will be from translated primary sources of the 13th and 14th centuries, written by the Mongols themselves and also by Persians, Chinese, Eastern Christians, Europeans, and other peoples that fought, surrendered to, or traded with the Mongol conquerors. The course will explore the Mongols, the most spectacular example of the nomadic conquerors who played such a large role in all Eurasian history, and survey how their empire affected themselves and the peoples they conquered. By using primary sources, the course will also provide a survey of civilizations in Eurasia in the 13th and 14th centuries, and give a hands-on example of how historians build historical knowledge from varied sources. EALC5780401 Cross Cultural Analysis https://coursesintouch.apps.upenn.edu/cpr/jsp/fast.do?webService=syll&t=202310&c=EALC1780401
EALC 2109-401 East Asian Ceramics Frank L Chance WILL 843 MW 5:15 PM-6:44 PM History of ceramic forms, techniques, and aesthetic principles in China, Korea, and Japan from neolithic times to the present century, illustrated by slides and examples, augmented by readings, field trips, and student presentations. Aimed at students with general interest in Japan and/or ceramics history; particularly but not exclusively those majoring in Asian and Middle Eastern Studies, East Asian Area Studies or History of Art; also art majors interested in ceramics. EALC5109401 Cross Cultural Analysis https://coursesintouch.apps.upenn.edu/cpr/jsp/fast.do?webService=syll&t=202310&c=EALC2109401
EALC 2201-401 Modern East Asian Texts Chloe Estep WILL 218 MW 10:15 AM-11:44 AM This course is an introduction to and exploration of modern East Asian literatures and cultures through close readings and discussion of selected literary works from the early 20th century to the start of the 21st century. Focusing on China, Japan, and Korea, we will explore the shared and interconnected experiences of modernity in East Asia as well as broaden our perspective by considering the location of East Asian cultural production within a global modernity. Major issues we will encounter include: nation-building and the modern novel; cultural translation; media and technology; representations of gender, race, and class; history and memory; colonialism; war; body and sexuality; globalization. No knowledge of the original language is required. COML2201401, COML6201401, EALC6201401 Cross Cultural Analysis https://coursesintouch.apps.upenn.edu/cpr/jsp/fast.do?webService=syll&t=202310&c=EALC2201401
EALC 2550-401 The Politics of Shinto Jolyon Thomas WILL 306 T 5:15 PM-8:14 PM Shinto-derived images and ideas frequently appear in Japanese anime and film, and journalists and academics frequently mobilize the term Shinto as a way of explaining Japan's past or envisioning its future. The environmentalist left champions a green Shinto while Shinto-derived ideas serve as red meat for politicians pandering to Japan's nationalist right. While the influential position Shinto occupies in Japanese sociopolitical life is therefore clear, the term Shinto itself is actually not. Depending on who one asks, Shinto is either the venerable indigenous religion of the Japanese archipelago, the irreducible core of Japanese culture, a tiny subset of Japanese Buddhism, an environmentalist ethic, or some combination of these. This course investigates the multifarious types of Shinto envisioned by these competing interest groups. EALC6550401, RELS2710401, RELS6710401 https://coursesintouch.apps.upenn.edu/cpr/jsp/fast.do?webService=syll&t=202310&c=EALC2550401
EALC 2771-401 Korea Through Ethnography Yoonjung Kang WILL 633 TR 1:45 PM-3:14 PM Over the last few decades, a substantial volume of the ethnographic studies of South Korea has produced. Providing critical insight into South Korea’s quite particular and transforming history and cultures of modernization, industrialization, and globalization, these ethnographic works help us understand many of the historical, political, and economic issues that have both defined and complicated modern Korean society and nationhood. In this course, we will explore the contemporary social and cultural life in South Korea through ethnographies. Major themes include modernization, capitalism, class, gender, family, religion, globalization, and popular culture. This class will be held as part lecture and part seminar format. ANTH1771401, ANTH6771401, EALC6771401 https://coursesintouch.apps.upenn.edu/cpr/jsp/fast.do?webService=syll&t=202310&c=EALC2771401
EALC 2926-401 Chinese Martial Arts Ori Tavor WILL 421 R 3:30 PM-6:29 PM This course offers a thematic introduction to the history of martial arts in China. Throughout the semester, we will explore the social, political, and cultural contexts of martial arts practice, from the classical period to the 21st century. The course will take an interdisciplinary approach to situating martial arts practices in history through an examination of religious, literary, and visual sources, against the backdrop of theoretical approaches from across gender studies, anthropology, and cultural theory. The course will be divided into three units. The first unit will focus on the cultural background that led to the emergence of martial arts practices in the pre-modern period. We will examine classical discourses on the human body and its cultivation and the role of medical practices and religious institutions, such as the Shaolin Temple, in the development of martial arts regimens. In the second unit, we will discuss the spread and popularization of martial arts practices in late imperial and modern Chinese society through a close reading of literary sources, such as wuxia novels and other works of fiction. In addition, we will explore the modernization and re-invention of martial arts in the late 19th centuryand early 20th century, when China attempts to re-establish itself as a modern nation. The third and final unit will be devoted to the global impact of Chinese martial arts in contemporary popular culture. Through a discussion and analysis of Kung Fu films, as well as video games, we will explore the role of martial arts narratives and practices in the construction of gender, cultural, and national identity and the various ways in which they are used by the current Chinese regime to assert its influence in the global arena. No knowledge of Chinese is presumed, and all readings will be available in English on the Canvas website in PDF form. Graduate students may take this course as EALC6926 and should see the instructor to discuss requirements for graduate credit. EALC6926401 Cross Cultural Analysis https://coursesintouch.apps.upenn.edu/cpr/jsp/fast.do?webService=syll&t=202310&c=EALC2926401
EALC 3126-401 Chinese Art in the Penn Museum Adam D Smith MUSE 329 MW 12:00 PM-1:29 PM This class is an opportunity to work closely with the Chinese sculpture, paintings, bronzes and other works of art in the collection of the Penn Museum. Some of the objects are well-known and on permanent display. Others have hardly been researched since they were acquired, and rarely leave storage. The class will meet in small groups at the museum. Students will work on research papers and collaborative in-class presentations on objects of their choice. A variety of approaches will be encouraged and students may choose to focus on iconography, historical and religious context, materials and manufacturing techniques, collectors and patronage, or inscriptions. There are no prerequisites for this course. EALC7126401 Cross Cultural Analysis
EALC 3211-401 Modern Chinese Poetry in a Global Context Chloe Estep DRLB 2C8 M 12:00 PM-2:59 PM The tumultuous political and economic history of modern China has been mirrored in and shaped by equally fundamental revolutions in language and poetic expression. In this course, we will take Chinese poetry as a crucible in which we can observe the interacting forces of literary history and social change. From diplomats who saw poetry as a medium for cultural translation between China and the world, to revolutionaries who enlisted poetry in the project of social transformation, we will examine the lives and works of some of China’s most prominent poets and ask, what can we learn about modern China from reading their poetry? In asking this question, we will also reckon with the strengths and limitations of using poetry as an historical source. In addition to poems, the course will include fiction, essays, photographs, and films by both Chinese and non-Chinese artists that place our poets in a broader context. We will pay close attention to how these poets represent China’s place in the world, as well as the role of language in social change. Topics of discussion include: national identity, revolution, translation, gender, the body, ethnicity, and technology. Familiarity with Chinese or related cultural context is beneficial, but not required. This course introduces students to Chinese poetry in English translation. Students will leave the course with an in-depth understanding of the main figures, themes, and techniques of Chinese poetry, and will be introduced to some of the major developments in the history of China. Through a focus on primary texts, students will develop the vocabulary and analytical skills to appreciate and analyze poetry in translation and will gain confidence as writers thinking about literary texts. ASAM3211401, COML3211401, COML7211401, EALC7211401 Cross Cultural Analysis https://coursesintouch.apps.upenn.edu/cpr/jsp/fast.do?webService=syll&t=202310&c=EALC3211401
EALC 3522-401 Medicine and Healing in China Hsiao-Wen Cheng BENN 419 TR 12:00 PM-1:29 PM This course explores Chinese medicine and healing culture, its diversity, and its change over time. We will discuss topics including the establishment of canonical medicine, Daoist approaches to healing and longevity, diverse views of the body and disease, the emergence of treatments for women, medical construction of sex difference and imagination of female sexuality, the thriving and decline of female healers, the identity of scholar physicians, the transmission of medical knowledge, domestic and cross-regional drug market, healer-patient relations, and new visions of traditional Chinese medicine in modern China. EALC7522401, HSOC3326401 Cross Cultural Analysis https://coursesintouch.apps.upenn.edu/cpr/jsp/fast.do?webService=syll&t=202310&c=EALC3522401
EALC 3531-401 Chinese Law and Society Teemu Ruskola WILL 28 W 3:30 PM-6:29 PM This course is an introduction to the study of law and society in China in a comparative and global context. We will begin by considering the tradition of imperial Chinese law and its social and philosophical foundations. We will then turn to the confrontation between the Qing empire and Euro-American imperial powers in the nineteenth century and the attendant collision between European and Chinese notions of sovereignty. Next, we will consider early twentieth-century law reforms as the Qing empire was transformed into the constitutional form of a modern republic, followed by the introduction of socialist law and the establishment of the People’s Republic of China. The course will conclude with post-Mao reforms and their implications for the future of Chinese law and society. Throughout the course, we will pay attention to the use of historical and comparative methods. What are the potentials and liabilities of using law as an analytical category in cross-cultural study? What happens when “Eastern” and “Western” legal cultures come in contact with each other? How is law related to capitalism and socialism? How does law structure political and socio-economic relations globally? How does law produce as well as constrain subjects and identities? What is the relationship between law, gender, and sexuality? EALC7531401
EALC 3532-401 Constitutionalism and Democracy in China: 1900-present Arthur Waldron PWH 108 T 1:45 PM-4:44 PM Research on constitutional thought in China from the late Qing to the present, as well as the political and practical aspects of attempts at implementation. A presentation and a research paper of moderate length are expected. Chinese language is not necessary, though if you have it, that will be useful. HIST3552401
EALC 3622-401 Introduction to Classical Chinese II Victor H Mair WILL 317 TR 1:45 PM-3:14 PM Continuation of Intro to Classical Chinese I, which is the only prerequisite for this course. Upon completion of Shadick, readings in a wide selection of texts with Chinese commentaries may be taken up. These readings are in part chosen to reflect student interest. This is the second half of a year-long course. Those who enroll must take both semesters. CHIN1055401, EALC7622401
EALC 4950-009 Honors Thesis Ori Tavor Course credit for EALC majors pursuing honors
EALC 5109-401 East Asian Ceramics Frank L Chance WILL 843 MW 5:15 PM-6:44 PM History of ceramic forms, techniques, and aesthetic principles in China, Korea, and Japan from neolithic times to the present century, illustrated by slides and examples, augmented by readings, field trips, and student presentations. Aimed at students with general interest in Japan and/or ceramics history; particularly but not exclusively those majoring in East Asian Languages & Civs, East Asian Area Studies or History of Art; also art majors interested in ceramics. EALC2109401 https://coursesintouch.apps.upenn.edu/cpr/jsp/fast.do?webService=syll&t=202310&c=EALC5109401
EALC 5242-401 Love and Loss in Japanese Literary Traditions: In Translation Linda H Chance WILL 723 TR 3:30 PM-4:59 PM How do people make sense of the multiple experiences that the simple words "love" and "loss" imply? How do they express their thoughts and feelings to one another? In this course, we will explore some means Japanese culture has found to grapple with these events and sensations. We will also see how these culturally sanctioned frameworks have shaped the ways Japanese view love and loss. Our materials will sample the literary tradition of Japan from earliest times to the early modern and even modern periods. Close readings of a diverse group of texts, including poetry, narrative, theater, and the related arts of calligraphy, painting, and music will structure our inquiry. The class will take an expedition to nearby Woodlands Cemetery to experience poetry in nature. By the end of the course, you should be able to appreciate texts that differ slightly in their value systems, linguistic expressions, and aesthetic sensibilities from those that you may already know. Among the available project work that you may select, if you have basic Japanese, is learning to read a literary manga. All shared class material is in English translation. EALC1242401, GSWS1242401
EALC 5746-401 Japan: The Age of the Samurai David Spafford WILL 29 MW 10:15 AM-11:44 AM Who (or what) where the samurai? What does it mean to say that Japan had an "Age of the Samurai"? In popular imagination, pre-modern Japan has long been associated with its hereditary warrior class. Countless movies have explored the character and martial prowess of these men. Yet warriors constituted but a tiny portion of the societies they inhabited and ruled, and historians researching medieval Japan have turned their attentions to a great range of subjects and to other classes (elite and commoner alike). This class is designed to acquaint students with the complex and diverse centuries that have been called the "Age of the Samurai"-roughly, the years between ca. 1110 and 1850. In the course of the semester, we will explore the central themes in the historiography of warrior society, while introducing some of the defining texts that have shaped our imagination of this age (from laws to epic poems, from codes of conduct to autobiographies). EALC1746401, HIST0751401
EALC 5780-401 Mongol Century Christopher Pratt Atwood WILL 723 TR 12:00 PM-1:29 PM This course deals with the empire built by the Mongols in the 13th century - the largest land empire in the world. Most readings will be from translated primary sources of the 13th and 14th centuries, written by the Mongols themselves and also by Persians, Chinese, Eastern Christians, Europeans, and other peoples that fought, surrendered to, or traded with the Mongol conquerors. The course will explore the Mongols, the most spectacular example of the nomadic conquerors who played such a large role in all Eurasian history, and survey how their empire affected themselves and the peoples they conquered. By using primary sources, the course will also provide a survey of civilizations in Eurasia in the 13th and 14th centuries, and give a hands-on example of how historians build historical knowledge from varied sources. Graduate students will receive training in more advanced source critical methodologies for dealing with these sources and for beginning research in this topic. EALC1780401 https://coursesintouch.apps.upenn.edu/cpr/jsp/fast.do?webService=syll&t=202310&c=EALC5780401
EALC 5999-024 Independent Study: Studies in the History of Literary Criticism Rita Copeland Independent study in courses with East Asian content for MA students
EALC 6201-401 Modern East Asian Texts Chloe Estep WILL 218 MW 10:15 AM-11:44 AM This course is an introduction to and exploration of modern East Asian literatures and cultures through close readings and discussion of selected literary works from the early 20th century to the start of the 21st century. Focusing on China, Japan, and Korea, we will explore the shared and interconnected experiences of modernity in East Asia as well as broaden our perspective by considering the location of East Asian cultural production within a global modernity. Major issues we will encounter include: nation-building and the modern novel; cultural translation; media and technology; representations of gender, race, and class; history and memory; colonialism; war; body and sexuality; globalization. No knowledge of the original language is required. COML2201401, COML6201401, EALC2201401 https://coursesintouch.apps.upenn.edu/cpr/jsp/fast.do?webService=syll&t=202310&c=EALC6201401
EALC 6371-401 New Korean Cinema So-Rim Lee PWH 108 T 10:15 AM-1:14 PM In 2019, Bong Joon-ho's Parasite won the Palme d'Or at the 72nd Cannes Film Festival. This event marked the apex of South Korean cinematic renaissance, having steadily become a tour de force in the international film festival scene since 1997 onwards. This course explores the major auteurs, styles, themes, and currents of the so-called "New Korean Cinema" that emerged in the mid-to-late 1990s to continue to this day. Drawing from texts on critical film and Korean studies, we will pay particular attention to how the selected works re-present, resist, and interweave the sociopolitical climate they concern and are born out of. Using cinema as a lens with which to see the society, we will touch upon major events of the twentieth century including national division, military dictatorship and democratization movements, IMF economic crisis, youth culture, hallyu (the Korean wave), and damunhwa (multiculturalism initiative). In so doing, we will closely examine how each cinematic medium addresses the societal power structure and the role of the "Other" it represents in terms of class, race, gender, and sexuality in the construction of contemporary Korean society. We will also briefly survey the history of South Korean cinema that has evolved hand-in-hand with the history of modern Korea itself, walking through its five different phases (1945-Korean War era;1955-1972 "Golden Age"; 1973-1979 censorship era; 1980-1996 democratization era; and 1997 onwards). No prior experience of Korean studies courses necessary; all films will be screened with English subtitles. CIMS1371401, CIMS6371401, EALC1371401
EALC 6550-401 The Politics of Shinto Jolyon Thomas WILL 306 T 5:15 PM-8:14 PM Shinto-derived images and ideas frequently appear in Japanese anime and film, and journalists and academics frequently mobilize the term Shinto as a way of explaining Japan's past or envisioning its future. The environmentalist left champions a green Shinto while Shinto-derived ideas serve as red meat for politicians pandering to Japan's nationalist right. While the influential position Shinto occupies in Japanese sociopolitical life is therefore clear, the term Shinto itself is actually not. Depending on who one asks, Shinto is either the venerable indigenous religion of the Japanese archipelago, the irreducible core of Japanese culture, a tiny subset of Japanese Buddhism, an environmentalist ethic, or some combination of these. This course investigates the multifarious types of Shinto envisioned by these competing interest groups. EALC2550401, RELS2710401, RELS6710401 https://coursesintouch.apps.upenn.edu/cpr/jsp/fast.do?webService=syll&t=202310&c=EALC6550401
EALC 6771-401 Korea Through Ethnography Yoonjung Kang WILL 633 TR 1:45 PM-3:14 PM Over the last few decades, a substantial volume of the ethnographic studies of South Korea has produced. Providing critical insight into South Korea’s quite particular and transforming history and cultures of modernization, industrialization, and globalization, these ethnographic works help us understand many of the historical, political, and economic issues that have both defined and complicated modern Korean society and nationhood. In this course, we will explore the contemporary social and cultural life in South Korea through ethnographies. Major themes include modernization, capitalism, class, gender, family, religion, globalization, and popular culture. This class will be held as part lecture and part seminar format. ANTH1771401, ANTH6771401, EALC2771401 https://coursesintouch.apps.upenn.edu/cpr/jsp/fast.do?webService=syll&t=202310&c=EALC6771401
EALC 6926-401 Chinese Martial Arts Ori Tavor WILL 421 R 3:30 PM-6:29 PM This course offers a thematic introduction to the history of martial arts in China. Throughout the semester, we will explore the social, political, and cultural contexts of martial arts practice, from the classical period to the 21st century. The course will take an interdisciplinary approach to situating martial arts practices in history through an examination of religious, literary, and visual sources, against the backdrop of theoretical approaches from across gender studies, anthropology, and cultural theory. The course will be divided into three units. The first unit will focus on the cultural background that led to the emergence of martial arts practices in the pre-modern period. We will examine classical discourses on the human body and its cultivation and the role of medical practices and religious institutions, such as the Shaolin Temple, in the development of martial arts regimens. In the second unit, we will discuss the spread and popularization of martial arts practices in late imperial and modern Chinese society through a close reading of literary sources, such as wuxia novels and other works of fiction. In addition, we will explore the modernization and re-invention of martial arts in the late 19th century and early 20th century, when China attempts to re-establish itself as a modern nation. The third and final unit will be devoted to the global impact of Chinese martial arts in contemporary popular culture. Through a discussion and analysis of Kung Fu films, as well as video games, we will explore the role of martial arts narratives and practices in the construction of gender, cultural, and national identity and the various ways in which they are used by the current Chinese regime to assert its influence in the global arena. No knowledge of Chinese is presumed, and all readings will be available in English on the Canvas website in PDF form. Graduate students may take this course as EALC 6926 and should see the instructor to discuss requirements for graduate credit. EALC2926401 https://coursesintouch.apps.upenn.edu/cpr/jsp/fast.do?webService=syll&t=202310&c=EALC6926401
EALC 7126-401 Chinese Art in the Penn Museum Adam D Smith MUSE 329 MW 12:00 PM-1:29 PM This class is an opportunity to work closely with the Chinese sculpture, paintings, bronzes and other works of art in the collection of the Penn Museum. Some of the objects are well-known and on permanent display. Others have hardly been researched since they were acquired, and rarely leave storage. The class will meet in small groups at the museum. Students will work on research papers and collaborative in-class presentations on objects of their choice. A variety of approaches will be encouraged and students may choose to focus on iconography, historical and religious context, materials and manufacturing techniques, collectors and patronage, or inscriptions. There are no prerequisites for this course. EALC3126401
EALC 7141-401 Ukiyo-e: Beyond the Great Wave Julie N Davis CANCELED In this seminar we will take a closer look at the prints, paintings, and illustrated books produced in the genre known as "ukiyo-e," the "pictures of the floating world." We'll begin by asking how the "Great Wave" became a global icon and we'll bust the myth of prints being used as wrapping paper. As we learn the history of the genre, from 1600 to ca. 1850, we'll also make critical interventions into that narrative, asking how "ukiyo-e" became a genre within a larger artistic sphere; how publishers collaborated with designers to construct artistic personae; how illustrated books contributed to knowledge formations; and how concepts of authenticity and authorship remain critical to its understanding. This course will also consider how internet resources affect our understanding of the work of art. Students need not have any Japanese language skills, but should have taken related courses in art history or East Asian Studies. Advanced undergraduates and graduate students preferred. ARTH5130401 Perm Needed From Department
EALC 7180-401 Archaeology of Central Asia Nancy R S Steinhardt WILL 201 W 1:45 PM-4:44 PM A site by site investigation of Buddhist and non-Buddhist ruins in Central Asia. Included are Nisa, Khwarezm, Pyandzhikent, Khalchayan, Ay-Khanum, Bamiyan, Miran, Tumshuk, Kizil, Kucha, Khotan, Adzhina-Tepe, Khocho, Khara-Khoto, and Bezeklik. EALC1180401
EALC 7211-401 Modern Chinese Poetry in a Global Context Chloe Estep DRLB 2C8 M 12:00 PM-2:59 PM The tumultuous political and economic history of modern China has been mirrored in and shaped by equally fundamental revolutions in language and poetic expression. In this course, we will take Chinese poetry as a crucible in which we can observe the interacting forces of literary history and social change. From diplomats who saw poetry as a medium for cultural translation between China and the world, to revolutionaries who enlisted poetry in the project of social transformation, we will examine the lives and works of some of China’s most prominent poets and ask, what can we learn about modern China from reading their poetry? In asking this question, we will also reckon with the strengths and limitations of using poetry as an historical source. In addition to poems, the course will include fiction, essays, photographs, and films by both Chinese and non-Chinese artists that place our poets in a broader context. We will pay close attention to how these poets represent China’s place in the world, as well as the role of language in social change. Topics of discussion include: national identity, revolution, translation, gender, the body, ethnicity, and technology.
Familiarity with Chinese or related cultural context is beneficial, but not required.
This course introduces students to Chinese poetry in English translation. Students will leave the course with an in-depth understanding of the main figures, themes, and techniques of Chinese poetry, and will be introduced to some of the major developments in the history of China. Through a focus on primary texts, students will develop the vocabulary and analytical skills to appreciate and analyze poetry in translation and will gain confidence as writers thinking about literary texts.
ASAM3211401, COML3211401, COML7211401, EALC3211401 https://coursesintouch.apps.upenn.edu/cpr/jsp/fast.do?webService=syll&t=202310&c=EALC7211401
EALC 7522-401 Medicine and Healing in China Hsiao-Wen Cheng BENN 419 TR 12:00 PM-1:29 PM This course explores Chinese medicine and healing culture, its diversity, and its change over time. We will discuss topics including the establishment of canonical medicine, Daoist approaches to healing and longevity, diverse views of the body and disease, the emergence of treatments for women, medical construction of sex difference and imagination of female sexuality, the thriving and decline of female healers, the identity of scholar physicians, the transmission of medical knowledge, domestic and cross-regional drug market, healer-patient relations, and new visions of traditional Chinese medicine in modern China. EALC3522401, HSOC3326401 https://coursesintouch.apps.upenn.edu/cpr/jsp/fast.do?webService=syll&t=202310&c=EALC7522401
EALC 7531-401 Chinese Law and Society Teemu Ruskola WILL 28 W 3:30 PM-6:29 PM This course is an introduction to the study of law and society in China in a comparative and global context. We will begin by considering the tradition of imperial Chinese law and its social and philosophical foundations. We will then turn to the confrontation between the Qing empire and Euro-American imperial powers in the nineteenth century and the attendant collision between European and Chinese notions of sovereignty. Next, we will consider early twentieth-century law reforms as the Qing empire was transformed into the constitutional form of a modern republic, followed by the introduction of socialist law and the establishment of the People’s Republic of China. The course will conclude with post-Mao reforms and their implications for the future of Chinese law and society. Throughout the course, we will pay attention to the use of historical and comparative methods. What are the potentials and liabilities of using law as an analytical category in cross-cultural study? What happens when “Eastern” and “Western” legal cultures come in contact with each other? How is law related to capitalism and socialism? How does law structure political and socio-economic relations globally? How does law produce as well as constrain subjects and identities? What is the relationship between law, gender, and sexuality? EALC3531401
EALC 7622-401 Introduction to Classical Chinese II Victor H Mair WILL 317 TR 1:45 PM-3:14 PM Continuation of Introduction to Classical Chinese I, which is the only prerequisite for this course. Upon completion of Shadick, readings in a wide selection of texts with Chinese commentaries may be taken up. These readings are in part chosen to reflect student interest. This is the second half of a year-long course. Those who enroll must take both semesters. CHIN1055401, EALC3622401
EALC 8622-401 Advanced Classical Chinese II Ori Tavor WILL 723 F 1:45 PM-4:44 PM Close reading and interpretation of texts in various styles of classical Chinese drawn from the Han, Wei, Tang, and Song periods. Focus on strengthening students' reading ability in classical Chinese. Attention to questions of style, rhetoric, and syntax. It is preferred, but not required, that students take Advanced Classical Chinese I first. CHIN8622401
EALC 8629-301 Seminar on Middle Vernacular Sinitic Victor H Mair WILL 203 W 3:30 PM-6:29 PM Students will be introduced to works in Middle vernacular Sinitic. Specific readings will vary semester to semester.
EALC 8725-301 Readings in Song Dynasty History Brian T Vivier WILL 303 M 3:30 PM-6:29 PM This seminar will introduce graduate students to current scholarship on the Song dynasty (960-1276) by surveying both classic and recent work in the field. Students will gain a foundation in how historians have interpreted the Song period and learn the major debates within the field. Readings will be principally in English, and no background in Chinese studies is required. https://coursesintouch.apps.upenn.edu/cpr/jsp/fast.do?webService=syll&t=202310&c=EALC8725301
EALC 8820-301 Sinological Methods Hsiao-Wen Cheng VANP 526 R 1:45 PM-4:44 PM This seminar is designed to acquaint graduate students with the basic methods and resources of Sino logical research. The course will begin with an overview of essential reference works and aids to study, such as dictionaries and concordances, and continue with a survey of the major primary sources for the study of traditional Chinese history. Students are required to demonstrate the use of the methods learned in the course in a research paper, to be presented to the class in the form of a brief lecture at the end of the semester. Only graduate students may enroll in this course. The prerequisites are reading knowledge of modern Chinese and two years of the classical language. Familiarity with Japanese, though not required, would prove helpful.
EALC 8990-001 Pedagogy David Spafford An independent study with the Graduate Chair for PhD students.
EALC 9997-009 Masters Thesis Ori Tavor Registration for MA students who have finished coursework and are writing their MA thesis or research papers. Perm Needed From Department
EALC 9999-006 Independent Study David Spafford Independent study in courses with East Asian content for PhD students.
JPAN 0105-680 Spoken Japanese II Ryo Nakayama WILL 723 TR 5:15 PM-7:14 PM Although some reading/writing instruction is given, the major emphasis is on oral communication skill. https://coursesintouch.apps.upenn.edu/cpr/jsp/fast.do?webService=syll&t=202310&c=JPAN0105680
JPAN 0200-001 Beginning Japanese II Nana Takeda Kolb WILL 303
WILL 303
R 10:15 AM-11:44 AM
MTW 10:15 AM-11:14 AM
A continuation of Beginning Japanese I, this course continues the introduction of the Japanese language. All four skills, speaking/listening/writing/reading, are equally emphasized. Hiragana/Katakana (Two sets of Japanese syllabic letters) and some Chinese characters (Kanji) are introduced. Textbooks: Genki I (Lesson 8- Lesson 12) and Genki II (Lesson 13- Lesson 14)Kanji: reproduction-approx. 170/recognition-approx.250 https://coursesintouch.apps.upenn.edu/cpr/jsp/fast.do?webService=syll&t=202310&c=JPAN0200001
JPAN 0200-002 Beginning Japanese II Nana Takeda Kolb WILL 201
WILL 201
R 12:00 PM-1:29 PM
MTW 12:00 PM-12:59 PM
A continuation of Beginning Japanese I, this course continues the introduction of the Japanese language. All four skills, speaking/listening/writing/reading, are equally emphasized. Hiragana/Katakana (Two sets of Japanese syllabic letters) and some Chinese characters (Kanji) are introduced. Textbooks: Genki I (Lesson 8- Lesson 12) and Genki II (Lesson 13- Lesson 14)Kanji: reproduction-approx. 170/recognition-approx.250 https://coursesintouch.apps.upenn.edu/cpr/jsp/fast.do?webService=syll&t=202310&c=JPAN0200002
JPAN 0200-003 Beginning Japanese II Nana Takeda Kolb WILL 318
WILL 321
R 1:45 PM-3:14 PM
MTW 1:45 PM-2:44 PM
A continuation of Beginning Japanese I, this course continues the introduction of the Japanese language. All four skills, speaking/listening/writing/reading, are equally emphasized. Hiragana/Katakana (Two sets of Japanese syllabic letters) and some Chinese characters (Kanji) are introduced. Textbooks: Genki I (Lesson 8- Lesson 12) and Genki II (Lesson 13- Lesson 14)Kanji: reproduction-approx. 170/recognition-approx.250 https://coursesintouch.apps.upenn.edu/cpr/jsp/fast.do?webService=syll&t=202310&c=JPAN0200003
JPAN 0400-001 Intermediate Japanese II Akiko Takamura Barnes WILL 5
WILL 5
R 10:15 AM-11:44 AM
MTW 10:15 AM-11:14 AM
Prerequisites: Completion of Intermediate Japanese I or the equivalent. This course completes the College language requirement. Textbooks: Genki II (Lesson 22- Lesson 23)and Tobira: Gate way to Advanced Japanese (Unit 1-Unit 3) Kanji: Approximately 140 new Kanji will be introduced. Overall Kanji knowledge will be about approx. 400. https://coursesintouch.apps.upenn.edu/cpr/jsp/fast.do?webService=syll&t=202310&c=JPAN0400001
JPAN 0400-002 Intermediate Japanese II Akiko Takamura Barnes WILL 216
WILL 216
MTW 12:00 PM-12:59 PM
R 12:00 PM-1:29 PM
Prerequisites: Completion of Intermediate Japanese I or the equivalent. This course completes the College language requirement. Textbooks: Genki II (Lesson 22- Lesson 23)and Tobira: Gate way to Advanced Japanese (Unit 1-Unit 3) Kanji: Approximately 140 new Kanji will be introduced. Overall Kanji knowledge will be about approx. 400. https://coursesintouch.apps.upenn.edu/cpr/jsp/fast.do?webService=syll&t=202310&c=JPAN0400002
JPAN 0400-003 Intermediate Japanese II Megumu Tamura WILL 25
WILL 843
WILL 28
T 1:45 PM-2:44 PM
R 1:45 PM-3:14 PM
MW 1:45 PM-2:44 PM
Prerequisites: Completion of Intermediate Japanese I or the equivalent. This course completes the College language requirement. Textbooks: Genki II (Lesson 22- Lesson 23)and Tobira: Gate way to Advanced Japanese (Unit 1-Unit 3) Kanji: Approximately 140 new Kanji will be introduced. Overall Kanji knowledge will be about approx. 400. https://coursesintouch.apps.upenn.edu/cpr/jsp/fast.do?webService=syll&t=202310&c=JPAN0400003
JPAN 0410-001 Intensive Intermediate Japanese I & II Ryo Nakayama WILL 204 MTWRF 10:15 AM-11:44 AM A continuation of Intensive Beginning Japanese, this class is equivalent to JPAN0300 Intermediate Japanese I and JPAN0400 intermediate Japanese II in one semester, 2CU, and completes the College language requirement. Textbooks: Genki II and Tobira: Gateway to Advanced Japanese (Unit 1-Unit 2) Kanji: Approximately 140 new Kanji will be introduced. Overall, Kanji knowledge will be about approx. 400. https://coursesintouch.apps.upenn.edu/cpr/jsp/fast.do?webService=syll&t=202310&c=JPAN0410001
JPAN 0600-001 High Intermediate Japanese II Megumu Tamura WILL 24 MTWR 10:15 AM-11:14 AM A continuation of Japanese language at the intermediate level. Textbooks: Tobira: Gateway to Advanced Japanese (Unit 9-Unit 15) Kanji: reproduction-approx.470/recognitio-approx.650 https://coursesintouch.apps.upenn.edu/cpr/jsp/fast.do?webService=syll&t=202310&c=JPAN0600001
JPAN 0600-002 High Intermediate Japanese II Megumu Tamura WILL 317 MTWR 12:00 PM-12:59 PM A continuation of Japanese language at the intermediate level. Textbooks: Tobira: Gateway to Advanced Japanese (Unit 9-Unit 15) Kanji: reproduction-approx.470/recognitio-approx.650 https://coursesintouch.apps.upenn.edu/cpr/jsp/fast.do?webService=syll&t=202310&c=JPAN0600002
JPAN 0760-680 Japanese for the Professions I Tomoko Takami CANCELED An intermediate level course of Japanese language focusing on workplace-related topics. Intended for students who will use Japanese in the professions. Textbook: Powering Up Your Japanese Through Case Studies: Intermediate and Advanced Japanese.
JPAN 0800-001 Advanced Japanese II Tomoko Takami WILL 3 MW 10:15 AM-11:44 AM PREREQUISITES Completion of Advanced Japanese I or the equivalent. Authentic materials and video clips will be used. https://coursesintouch.apps.upenn.edu/cpr/jsp/fast.do?webService=syll&t=202310&c=JPAN0800001
JPAN 0860-680 Japanese for the Professions II Tomoko Takami CANCELED An intermediate level course of Japanese language focusing on workplace-related topics. Intended for students who will use Japanese in the professions. Textbook: Powering Up Your Japanese through Case Studies: Intermediate and Advanced Japanese.
JPAN 1045-401 Advanced Japanese IV Tomoko Takami WILL 723 MW 12:00 PM-1:29 PM A continuation of Japanese language at the advanced level. Authentic materials and video clips will be used. JPAN6045401 https://coursesintouch.apps.upenn.edu/cpr/jsp/fast.do?webService=syll&t=202310&c=JPAN1045401
JPAN 1085-680 Advanced Japanese for Proficiency II Nana Takeda Kolb WILL 25 MW 3:30 PM-4:59 PM This course is for students with an advanced-low or advanced-mid background in Japanese, aiming to strengthen the four language skills (speaking, reading, writing, and listening) and to deepen their understanding of Japanese culture. The class will use authentic Japanese through media, such as newspapers, television, and articles, regarding Japanese culture and society as well as current news. Students will narrate, describe, and express their opinions with details, examples, and strong reasoning, using sophisticated terms and phrases related such topics. https://coursesintouch.apps.upenn.edu/cpr/jsp/fast.do?webService=syll&t=202310&c=JPAN1085680
JPAN 6045-401 Advanced Japanese IV Tomoko Takami WILL 723 MW 12:00 PM-1:29 PM A continuation of Japanese language at the advanced level. Authentic materials and video clips will be used. JPAN1045401 https://coursesintouch.apps.upenn.edu/cpr/jsp/fast.do?webService=syll&t=202310&c=JPAN6045401
KORN 0100-001 Beginning Korean I Hyobin Won WILL 741 MW 3:30 PM-5:29 PM This course is designed for students who have little or no knowledge of Korean. This course aims to develop foundational reading, writing, listening, and speaking skills through meaningful communicative activities and tasks. Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to comprehend and carry on simple daily conversations and create simple sentences in the past, present, and future tenses. Students will learn how to introduce themselves, describe their surroundings, talk about daily lives, friends and relatives, and talk about past and future events.
KORN 0105-680 Spoken Korean II Siwon Lee WILL 302 MW 3:30 PM-4:59 PM A continuation of Spoken Korean I, this course aims to further develop oral communication skills by exploring a variety of topics, such as shopping, hobbies, family and future plans. Class activities include interactive tasks, role plays and presentations. Cultural topics will also be incorporated in order to further deepen students' understanding of Korea's culture and language. Upon completion of the course, students will be able to comprehend and carry on basic conversations; exchange information on a variety of topics in the past, present and future tenses; and achieve a proficiency level of Novice High based on the ACTFL (American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages) proficiency scale. NOTE: This course does not count toward the language requirement or the EALC major or minor. Offered through the Penn Language Center.
KORN 0200-001 Beginning Korean II Hyesun Jang WILL 304
WILL 220
WILL 218
W 10:15 AM-11:44 AM
T 10:15 AM-11:14 AM
R 10:15 AM-11:44 AM
A continuation of Beginning Korean I, this course aims to further develop the four language skills of students to the novice-high level by building on materials covered in that class. Students will learn how to use three speech styles (polite formal, informal, and intimate) appropriately in a given context. Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to handle simple and elementary needs of daily lives and talk (and write) about a variety of topics such as family, college life, birthday celebration, shopping, Korean food, etc.
KORN 0200-002 Beginning Korean II Hyesun Jang DRLB 4N30
DRLB 3N6
M 12:00 PM-12:59 PM
TW 12:00 PM-1:29 PM
A continuation of Beginning Korean I, this course aims to further develop the four language skills of students to the novice-high level by building on materials covered in that class. Students will learn how to use three speech styles (polite formal, informal, and intimate) appropriately in a given context. Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to handle simple and elementary needs of daily lives and talk (and write) about a variety of topics such as family, college life, birthday celebration, shopping, Korean food, etc.
KORN 0200-003 Beginning Korean II Hyesun Jang WILL 201 TR 3:30 PM-5:29 PM A continuation of Beginning Korean I, this course aims to further develop the four language skills of students to the novice-high level by building on materials covered in that class. Students will learn how to use three speech styles (polite formal, informal, and intimate) appropriately in a given context. Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to handle simple and elementary needs of daily lives and talk (and write) about a variety of topics such as family, college life, birthday celebration, shopping, Korean food, etc.
KORN 0400-001 Intermediate Korean II Siwon Lee WILL 215
WILL 219
WILL 214
W 12:00 PM-1:29 PM
T 12:00 PM-12:59 PM
R 12:00 PM-1:29 PM
This is a continuation of Intermediate Korean I. This course is designed to develop students' Korean language proficiency to the intermediate-mid level of the ACTFL Proficiency Guidelines. This course expands student's competence by dealing with more functions in various contexts that students can frequently encounter in everyday interactions. In order to prepare students for social contexts, students are encouraged to engage in conversations by personalizing the topics, functions or contexts. Students will perform in an interpersonal way by providing and obtaining information, expressing feelings and emotions, and exchanging opinions on a variety of topics such as birthday parties, recreation and hobbies, Korean holidays, marriage, cultural differences, education and jobs. This course completes the College language requirement.
KORN 0400-002 Intermediate Korean II Siwon Lee WILL 741 TR 3:30 PM-5:29 PM This is a continuation of Intermediate Korean I. This course is designed to develop students' Korean language proficiency to the intermediate-mid level of the ACTFL Proficiency Guidelines. This course expands student's competence by dealing with more functions in various contexts that students can frequently encounter in everyday interactions. In order to prepare students for social contexts, students are encouraged to engage in conversations by personalizing the topics, functions or contexts. Students will perform in an interpersonal way by providing and obtaining information, expressing feelings and emotions, and exchanging opinions on a variety of topics such as birthday parties, recreation and hobbies, Korean holidays, marriage, cultural differences, education and jobs. This course completes the College language requirement.
KORN 0420-001 Korean for Heritage Speakers II Hyobin Won WILL 218
WILL 304
WILL 305
T 10:15 AM-11:44 AM
M 10:15 AM-11:14 AM
W 10:15 AM-11:44 AM
This course is a continuation of Korean for Heritage Speakers I, and aims to further develop students' linguistic and cultural competence by building on materials covered in that class. In addition to gaining a deeper understanding of Korean culture, the course focuses on enhancing linguistic accuracy and fluency in both spoken and written Korean. Particular emphasis will be placed on building a meaningful Korean-speaking community, as well as consolidation of grammar structures, and expansion and enhancement of vocabulary. Topics include preparing for a trip to Korea, finding housing, college culture in Korea, entertainment and participating in various social events. Upon completion of this course, students will be able to express themselves more accurately and participate in Korea-related communities more meaningfully. This course completes the College language requirement.
KORN 0420-002 Korean for Heritage Speakers II Hyobin Won WILL 214
WILL 214
M 12:00 PM-12:59 PM
TW 12:00 PM-1:29 PM
This course is a continuation of Korean for Heritage Speakers I, and aims to further develop students' linguistic and cultural competence by building on materials covered in that class. In addition to gaining a deeper understanding of Korean culture, the course focuses on enhancing linguistic accuracy and fluency in both spoken and written Korean. Particular emphasis will be placed on building a meaningful Korean-speaking community, as well as consolidation of grammar structures, and expansion and enhancement of vocabulary. Topics include preparing for a trip to Korea, finding housing, college culture in Korea, entertainment and participating in various social events. Upon completion of this course, students will be able to express themselves more accurately and participate in Korea-related communities more meaningfully. This course completes the College language requirement.
KORN 0600-001 High Intermediate Korean II Katherine I Kang WILL 633 TR 10:15 AM-11:44 AM This is a continuation of Advanced Korean I. Students continue to develop functional proficiency in Korean at the advanced-low level. The topics include literature, culture, Korean customs, and social issues in contemporary Korea.
KORN 0800-001 Advanced Korean II Hyesun Jang WILL 24 MW 3:30 PM-4:59 PM KORN 0800 is a sequel to KORN 0700 (Advanced Korean I) that focuses on further developing language skills and intercultural competence at the advanced level, so that students can communicate in a clearly participatory manner regarding various topics of personal and general interests. Students will engage in various task-based activities to expand lexical repertoire, refine grammar, and develop appropriate and effective interactional skills in Korean. Students’ active engagement in learning through presentations and projects will constitute a crucial part of the course. Upon completion of the course, students will be able to participate in Korean-speaking communities in meaningful ways and competently and confidently interact with Korean people, utilize their linguistic knowledge in a wider range of social settings, and develop a deeper understanding and appreciation of Korea’s language and culture. According to the ACTFL (American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages) oral proficiency guidelines, students will attain Advanced Low/Mid-Level and sufficient linguistic and cultural competence to advance to a content-and-language course beyond the 0700 level.
KORN 0860-680 Business Korean I Heejin Kim DRLB 3N6 MW 3:30 PM-4:59 PM Offered through the Penn Language Center. Business Korean I is designed for students who want to sharpen their Korean language skills to the advanced-high level by focusing their study on Korean business and economy. Students will learn business/economy-related terminologies and concepts. They will also take an in-depth look at the issues related to business practices and environment in Korea. Students will improve and refine their language skills through actively participating in discussions, research, and presentations.
KORN 0875-680 Current Korean Media II Hyobin Won JAFF 104 TR 3:30 PM-4:59 PM Offered through the Penn Language Center. Current Korean Media II aims at a deeper understanding of the contemporary Korean society, through critical analysis of language use and viewpoints expressed in various types of media including the Internet, TV, films, magazines and newspapers. This course will focus on cultural products and practices such as popular culture, media culture, and entertainment. By catering to the needs and interests of individual learners of Korean, the course will provide them with a rich opportunity to relate what they have learned in previous Korean language courses to the larger context of Korean culture and society. In addition, students will have an in-depth discussion on topics related to Korean society as well as Penn news. This course is conducted entirely in Korean.
KORN 1045-401 Advanced Readings in Modern Korean II Siwon Lee WILL 302 M 5:15 PM-8:14 PM This course allows development of creative and analytical thinking through introduction of more organized thematic topics such as family, human relationships, and the reflection of self-images, and individual's mental status while the society changes in time. KORN6045401
KORN 6045-401 Advanced Readings in Modern Korean II Siwon Lee WILL 302 M 5:15 PM-8:14 PM This course allows development of creative and analytical thinking through introduction of more organized thematic topics such as family, human relationships, and the reflection of self-images, and individual's mental status while the society changes in time. KORN1045401