Title Instructors Location Time Description Cross listings Fulfills Registration notes Syllabus Syllabus URL
ALAN 140-001 Elem Mongolian I Narantsetseg Tseveendulam MW 12:00 PM-02:00 PM Mongolian is the national language of the independent State of Mongolia and the language of the nomadic warriors Genghis Khan (known to the Mongolians themselves as Chinggis Khan). It is also spoken in China and Siberia. Today Mongolian musical styles like throat singing (khoomii), products like cashmere (nooluur), and tourism to visit Mongolia's nomadic herders (malchid) are making a mark on the world stage. In this class the students will learn the basics of modern Mongolian language, as spoken in Ulaanbaatar "Red Hero," the country's capital. They will learn in the phonetic Cyrillic script, which was adapted to Mongolian language from Russian in 1945, with a few additional letters. Basic grammar will be taught through communicative methodology. Students will also have opportunity to experience Mongolian arts, culture, and cooking in and out of class.
ALAN 240-001 Interm Mongolian I Narantsetseg Tseveendulam MW 03:30 PM-05:30 PM Mongolian is the national language of the independent State of Mongolia and the language of the nomadic warriors Genghis Khan (known to the Mongolians themselves as Chinggis Khan). It is also spoken in China and Siberia. Today Mongolian musical styles like throat singing (khoomii), products like cashmere (nooluur), and tourism to visit Mongolia's nomadic herders (malchid) are making a mark on the world stage. In this class the students will continue with the basics of modern Mongolian language, as spoken in Ulaanbaatar "Red Hero," the country's capital. They will learn in the phonetic Cyrillic script, which was adapted to Mongolian language from Russian in 1945, with a few additional letters. Intermediate and more advanced grammar will be taught through communicative methodology. Students will also have opportunity to experience Mongolian arts, culture, and cooking in and out of class. This is the first semester of Intermediate Mongolian. By the end of two semesters intermediate Mongolian, students will have learned all the noun forms, and all the major verb forms and will be able to form complex, multi-clause sentences, telling stories, expressing their feelings, and making arguments and explanations. They should be able to interact in all basic "survival" situations in Mongolia.
CHIN 001-680 1st Yr Spoken Chinese I Maiheng Shen Dietrich MW 03:30 PM-05:30 PM This course is designed for students who have little or no previous exposure to Chinese. The main objective of the course is to help students develop their listening and speaking skills. The emphasis is on correct pronunciation, accurate tones and mastery of basic grammatical structures. By the end of the second semester, students will be able to manage many situations that have immediate concern to them, such as relating one's personal life and experiences, expressing preferences and feelings, ordering meals, purchasing goods, asking for directions. Chinese characters will not be taught. See LPS Course Guide. **This course fulfills LPS language requirement only. It does not fulfill the laguage requirement for other colleged only. https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021C&course=CHIN001680
CHIN 011-001 Beginning Mod Chinese I Shihui Fan MTWR 03:30 PM-04:30 PM Along with Beginning Modern Chinese II, Beginning Chinese III (Non-Intensive) and Beginning Chinese IV, this is the first course of a four-semester sequence. By completing all four semesters, students fulfill the College language requirement. The sequence starts each fall. Students cannot begin their study in the spring. This course is designed primarily for students who have little or no prior exposure to Chinese. The objective of the course is to help students build a solid foundation of the four basic skills--listening, speaking, reading, and writing in an interactive and communicative learning environment. The emphasis is on correct pronunciation, accurate tones, and mastery of basic grammatical structures, laying the foundation needed to be able to manage social situations such as relating one's personal life and experiences, expressing preferences and feelings, ordering meals, purchasing goods, and asking for directions. In order to achieve these goals, students are expected to thoroughly preview and review the materials according to the weekly lesson plan (on course website) prior to attending class. Regular attendance is mandatory and strictly monitored. Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen. https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021C&course=CHIN011001
CHIN 011-002 Beginning Mod Chinese I Xiaomeng Zhang MTWR 10:15 AM-11:15 AM Along with Beginning Modern Chinese II, Beginning Chinese III (Non-Intensive) and Beginning Chinese IV, this is the first course of a four-semester sequence. By completing all four semesters, students fulfill the College language requirement. The sequence starts each fall. Students cannot begin their study in the spring. This course is designed primarily for students who have little or no prior exposure to Chinese. The objective of the course is to help students build a solid foundation of the four basic skills--listening, speaking, reading, and writing in an interactive and communicative learning environment. The emphasis is on correct pronunciation, accurate tones, and mastery of basic grammatical structures, laying the foundation needed to be able to manage social situations such as relating one's personal life and experiences, expressing preferences and feelings, ordering meals, purchasing goods, and asking for directions. In order to achieve these goals, students are expected to thoroughly preview and review the materials according to the weekly lesson plan (on course website) prior to attending class. Regular attendance is mandatory and strictly monitored. Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen. https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021C&course=CHIN011002
CHIN 011-003 Beginning Mod Chinese I Maiheng Shen Dietrich MTWR 10:15 AM-11:15 AM Along with Beginning Modern Chinese II, Beginning Chinese III (Non-Intensive) and Beginning Chinese IV, this is the first course of a four-semester sequence. By completing all four semesters, students fulfill the College language requirement. The sequence starts each fall. Students cannot begin their study in the spring. This course is designed primarily for students who have little or no prior exposure to Chinese. The objective of the course is to help students build a solid foundation of the four basic skills--listening, speaking, reading, and writing in an interactive and communicative learning environment. The emphasis is on correct pronunciation, accurate tones, and mastery of basic grammatical structures, laying the foundation needed to be able to manage social situations such as relating one's personal life and experiences, expressing preferences and feelings, ordering meals, purchasing goods, and asking for directions. In order to achieve these goals, students are expected to thoroughly preview and review the materials according to the weekly lesson plan (on course website) prior to attending class. Regular attendance is mandatory and strictly monitored. Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen. https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021C&course=CHIN011003
CHIN 011-004 Beginning Mod Chinese I Shihui Fan MTWR 12:00 PM-01:00 PM Along with Beginning Modern Chinese II, Beginning Chinese III (Non-Intensive) and Beginning Chinese IV, this is the first course of a four-semester sequence. By completing all four semesters, students fulfill the College language requirement. The sequence starts each fall. Students cannot begin their study in the spring. This course is designed primarily for students who have little or no prior exposure to Chinese. The objective of the course is to help students build a solid foundation of the four basic skills--listening, speaking, reading, and writing in an interactive and communicative learning environment. The emphasis is on correct pronunciation, accurate tones, and mastery of basic grammatical structures, laying the foundation needed to be able to manage social situations such as relating one's personal life and experiences, expressing preferences and feelings, ordering meals, purchasing goods, and asking for directions. In order to achieve these goals, students are expected to thoroughly preview and review the materials according to the weekly lesson plan (on course website) prior to attending class. Regular attendance is mandatory and strictly monitored. Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen. https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021C&course=CHIN011004
CHIN 011-005 Beginning Mod Chinese I Xiaomeng Zhang MTWR 12:00 PM-01:00 PM Along with Beginning Modern Chinese II, Beginning Chinese III (Non-Intensive) and Beginning Chinese IV, this is the first course of a four-semester sequence. By completing all four semesters, students fulfill the College language requirement. The sequence starts each fall. Students cannot begin their study in the spring. This course is designed primarily for students who have little or no prior exposure to Chinese. The objective of the course is to help students build a solid foundation of the four basic skills--listening, speaking, reading, and writing in an interactive and communicative learning environment. The emphasis is on correct pronunciation, accurate tones, and mastery of basic grammatical structures, laying the foundation needed to be able to manage social situations such as relating one's personal life and experiences, expressing preferences and feelings, ordering meals, purchasing goods, and asking for directions. In order to achieve these goals, students are expected to thoroughly preview and review the materials according to the weekly lesson plan (on course website) prior to attending class. Regular attendance is mandatory and strictly monitored. Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen. https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021C&course=CHIN011005
CHIN 011-006 Beginning Mod Chinese I Mushi Li MTWR 01:45 PM-02:45 PM Along with Beginning Modern Chinese II, Beginning Chinese III (Non-Intensive) and Beginning Chinese IV, this is the first course of a four-semester sequence. By completing all four semesters, students fulfill the College language requirement. The sequence starts each fall. Students cannot begin their study in the spring. This course is designed primarily for students who have little or no prior exposure to Chinese. The objective of the course is to help students build a solid foundation of the four basic skills--listening, speaking, reading, and writing in an interactive and communicative learning environment. The emphasis is on correct pronunciation, accurate tones, and mastery of basic grammatical structures, laying the foundation needed to be able to manage social situations such as relating one's personal life and experiences, expressing preferences and feelings, ordering meals, purchasing goods, and asking for directions. In order to achieve these goals, students are expected to thoroughly preview and review the materials according to the weekly lesson plan (on course website) prior to attending class. Regular attendance is mandatory and strictly monitored. Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen. https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021C&course=CHIN011006
CHIN 021-001 Inten Beg Mod Chin I&Ii Chih-Jen Lee MTWRF 10:15 AM-11:45 AM This is a two-semester course covering the same material as CHIN011, CHIN012, CHIN111 and CHIN112. The main objective of the course is to help students build a solid foundation of the four basic skills--listening, speaking, reading, and writing Chinese. By the end of this course and CHIN022, students should achieve the following goals: 1)pronounce all the sounds in Mandarin Chinese accurately and comfortably with a good command of the 4 tones; 2)carry out basic conversations in daily activities; 3) recognize and reproduce approximately 600-650 characters; and 4) read edited simple stories and write short notes or letters. Grammatical and cultural related issues are discussed during lecture hours. Oral communication tasks are given every week. Designed for students who have had limited prior exposure to some form of Chinese (Mandarin or other dialects), but inadequate to advance to the intermediate level. Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen. https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021C&course=CHIN021001
CHIN 031-001 Beg Rdg/Wrtg Chinese I Jing Hu MTWR 10:15 AM-11:15 AM The course is designed for students who can speak Chinese but cannot read and write in Chinese characters. The major purpose of this course is to help students develop the ability to use written Mandarin Chinese in linguistically and socially appropriate ways. The literacy goal is to master 350 to 1000 Chinese characters and to reach an intermediate-low level of ACTFL literacy proficiency. The key teaching approach is to holistically read a prodigious amount of materials. Students' reading abilities will be developed through reading short stories under instructions, and eventually through reading long stories and news independently. Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen. https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021C&course=CHIN031001
CHIN 031-002 Beg Rdg/Wrtg Chinese I Grace Mei-Hui Wu MTWR 12:00 PM-01:00 PM The course is designed for students who can speak Chinese but cannot read and write in Chinese characters. The major purpose of this course is to help students develop the ability to use written Mandarin Chinese in linguistically and socially appropriate ways. The literacy goal is to master 350 to 1000 Chinese characters and to reach an intermediate-low level of ACTFL literacy proficiency. The key teaching approach is to holistically read a prodigious amount of materials. Students' reading abilities will be developed through reading short stories under instructions, and eventually through reading long stories and news independently. Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen. https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021C&course=CHIN031002
CHIN 031-003 Beg Rdg/Wrtg Chinese I Jing Hu MTWR 12:00 PM-01:00 PM The course is designed for students who can speak Chinese but cannot read and write in Chinese characters. The major purpose of this course is to help students develop the ability to use written Mandarin Chinese in linguistically and socially appropriate ways. The literacy goal is to master 350 to 1000 Chinese characters and to reach an intermediate-low level of ACTFL literacy proficiency. The key teaching approach is to holistically read a prodigious amount of materials. Students' reading abilities will be developed through reading short stories under instructions, and eventually through reading long stories and news independently. Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen. https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021C&course=CHIN031003
CHIN 031-004 Beg Rdg/Wrtg Chinese I Grace Mei-Hui Wu MTWR 01:45 PM-02:45 PM The course is designed for students who can speak Chinese but cannot read and write in Chinese characters. The major purpose of this course is to help students develop the ability to use written Mandarin Chinese in linguistically and socially appropriate ways. The literacy goal is to master 350 to 1000 Chinese characters and to reach an intermediate-low level of ACTFL literacy proficiency. The key teaching approach is to holistically read a prodigious amount of materials. Students' reading abilities will be developed through reading short stories under instructions, and eventually through reading long stories and news independently. Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen. https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021C&course=CHIN031004
CHIN 041-680 Beginning Cantonese I Yan Huang TR 05:15 PM-07:00 PM Beginning Cantonese is a preliminary course for spoken Cantonese. The course provides fundamental aspects of the dialect as experienced in daily life situations and lays the foundation which will enable students to communicate in Cantonese for daily life needs, such as making phone calls, making purchases, getting around by various means of transportation, seeing a doctor, being a guest or a host at dinner, talking about the weather, talking about sports and entertainment, etc. It is strongly recommended that students continue to Beginning Cantonese II to become conversational.
CHIN 051-680 Beginning Taiwanese I Grace Mei-Hui Wu TR 03:30 PM-05:00 PM Beginning Taiwanese I is designed to help students learn enough to enable them to handle basic social interactions when visiting Taiwan, such as greeting others, introducing yourself, ordering food, asking directions, etc. You will also learn to listen and understand the oral language typically heard in locations such as the grocery store, train station, bus stop, and restaurants. https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021C&course=CHIN051680
CHIN 081-680 Begin Business Chinese I MW 03:30 PM-05:30 PM The course is designed for juniors and seniors , and Penn working professionals who have no prior exposure to Chinese, and are interested in learning basic Chinese language and culture for the preparation of a business trip to China. The objective of this course is to build a foundation of basic Chinese in the business context, with a main focus on speaking and listening, and minimal reading. Upon completion, students are expected to be able to converse and interact with people in a variety of traveling settings and in company visits. Topics include meeting people, talking about family, introducing companies, making inquiries and appointments, visiting companies, introducing products, initiating dining invitations, and practicing dining etiquette.
CHIN 111-001 Beginning Chinese IIi Xiaomeng Zhang MTWR 08:30 AM-10:00 AM Along with CHIN011, CHIN012 and CHIN112, this is the third course in a four-semester sequence. The objective of the course is to continue building a solid foundation of the four basic skills--listening, speaking, reading and writing. By the end of this course, students should achieve the following goals: 1) pronounce all the sounds in Mandarin accurately and comfortably with a good command of the four tones; 2) carry out simple dialogues of familiar topics; 3) recognize and reproduce approximately 450-500 characters; and 4) read short textbook stories and write simple notes. In order to develop students' listening and speaking ability, oral communication tasks are given on each lesson. Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Prior Language Experience Required
https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021C&course=CHIN111001
CHIN 111-002 Beginning Chinese IIi Shihui Fan MTWR 10:15 AM-11:15 AM Along with CHIN011, CHIN012 and CHIN112, this is the third course in a four-semester sequence. The objective of the course is to continue building a solid foundation of the four basic skills--listening, speaking, reading and writing. By the end of this course, students should achieve the following goals: 1) pronounce all the sounds in Mandarin accurately and comfortably with a good command of the four tones; 2) carry out simple dialogues of familiar topics; 3) recognize and reproduce approximately 450-500 characters; and 4) read short textbook stories and write simple notes. In order to develop students' listening and speaking ability, oral communication tasks are given on each lesson. Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen. https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021C&course=CHIN111002
CHIN 111-003 Beginning Chinese IIi Chih-Jen Lee MTWR 12:00 PM-01:00 PM Along with CHIN011, CHIN012 and CHIN112, this is the third course in a four-semester sequence. The objective of the course is to continue building a solid foundation of the four basic skills--listening, speaking, reading and writing. By the end of this course, students should achieve the following goals: 1) pronounce all the sounds in Mandarin accurately and comfortably with a good command of the four tones; 2) carry out simple dialogues of familiar topics; 3) recognize and reproduce approximately 450-500 characters; and 4) read short textbook stories and write simple notes. In order to develop students' listening and speaking ability, oral communication tasks are given on each lesson. Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen. https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021C&course=CHIN111003
CHIN 111-004 Beginning Chinese IIi Mushi Li MTWR 12:00 PM-01:00 PM Along with CHIN011, CHIN012 and CHIN112, this is the third course in a four-semester sequence. The objective of the course is to continue building a solid foundation of the four basic skills--listening, speaking, reading and writing. By the end of this course, students should achieve the following goals: 1) pronounce all the sounds in Mandarin accurately and comfortably with a good command of the four tones; 2) carry out simple dialogues of familiar topics; 3) recognize and reproduce approximately 450-500 characters; and 4) read short textbook stories and write simple notes. In order to develop students' listening and speaking ability, oral communication tasks are given on each lesson. Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen. https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021C&course=CHIN111004
CHIN 111-005 Beginning Chinese IIi Shihui Fan MTWR 01:45 PM-02:45 PM Along with CHIN011, CHIN012 and CHIN112, this is the third course in a four-semester sequence. The objective of the course is to continue building a solid foundation of the four basic skills--listening, speaking, reading and writing. By the end of this course, students should achieve the following goals: 1) pronounce all the sounds in Mandarin accurately and comfortably with a good command of the four tones; 2) carry out simple dialogues of familiar topics; 3) recognize and reproduce approximately 450-500 characters; and 4) read short textbook stories and write simple notes. In order to develop students' listening and speaking ability, oral communication tasks are given on each lesson. Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen. https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021C&course=CHIN111005
CHIN 111-006 Beginning Chinese IIi Mushi Li MTWR 03:30 PM-04:30 PM Along with CHIN011, CHIN012 and CHIN112, this is the third course in a four-semester sequence. The objective of the course is to continue building a solid foundation of the four basic skills--listening, speaking, reading and writing. By the end of this course, students should achieve the following goals: 1) pronounce all the sounds in Mandarin accurately and comfortably with a good command of the four tones; 2) carry out simple dialogues of familiar topics; 3) recognize and reproduce approximately 450-500 characters; and 4) read short textbook stories and write simple notes. In order to develop students' listening and speaking ability, oral communication tasks are given on each lesson. Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen. https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021C&course=CHIN111006
CHIN 111-007 Beginning Chinese IIi CANCELED Along with CHIN011, CHIN012 and CHIN112, this is the third course in a four-semester sequence. The objective of the course is to continue building a solid foundation of the four basic skills--listening, speaking, reading and writing. By the end of this course, students should achieve the following goals: 1) pronounce all the sounds in Mandarin accurately and comfortably with a good command of the four tones; 2) carry out simple dialogues of familiar topics; 3) recognize and reproduce approximately 450-500 characters; and 4) read short textbook stories and write simple notes. In order to develop students' listening and speaking ability, oral communication tasks are given on each lesson.
CHIN 141-680 Intermediate Cantonese I Yan Huang TR 03:30 PM-05:00 PM Intermediate Cantonese is a course for students who are able to communicate in the dialect in basic survival situations. Through this course, the students will acquire a better understanding of Cantonese and its related culture, and can confidently cope with a wide range of situations. Classes will be conducted through Cantonese textbooks, discussions of various topics, and composition and presentation of students' own dialogues so that in time they may express more complex ideas and feelings. Continuation to Intermediate Cantonese II is strongly encouraged. Prior Language Experience Required
CHIN 151-680 Intermediate Taiwanese I Grace Mei-Hui Wu Students will further develop their speaking and listening skills and will be able to communicate with ease and confidence when dealing with everyday routine tasks. Students will also gain skills to process and seek information in Taiwanese. Conversation toics include New Year, folk songs, and Tang poetry. Authentic materials are used for enhancing reading, listening, and speaking practices. Prior Language Experience Required
CHIN 211-001 Intermed Mod Chinese I Ye Tian MTWR 10:15 AM-11:15 AM This is an intermediate language course. It aims to develop students' overall linguistic skills in listening, speaking, reading, and writing Chinese. The specially designed textbook gives introduction to various topics on Chinese culture. Students can expect to gain knowledge about China while they are learning the language. By completion of the course, students are expected to be able to master 1200 most frequently used characters in common reading materials, and to communicate with Chinese on https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021C&course=CHIN211001
CHIN 211-002 Intermed Mod Chinese I Ye Tian MTWR 12:00 PM-01:00 PM This is an intermediate language course. It aims to develop students' overall linguistic skills in listening, speaking, reading, and writing Chinese. The specially designed textbook gives introduction to various topics on Chinese culture. Students can expect to gain knowledge about China while they are learning the language. By completion of the course, students are expected to be able to master 1200 most frequently used characters in common reading materials, and to communicate with Chinese on https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021C&course=CHIN211002
CHIN 211-003 Intermed Mod Chinese I Jing Hu MTWR 01:45 PM-02:45 PM This is an intermediate language course. It aims to develop students' overall linguistic skills in listening, speaking, reading, and writing Chinese. The specially designed textbook gives introduction to various topics on Chinese culture. Students can expect to gain knowledge about China while they are learning the language. By completion of the course, students are expected to be able to master 1200 most frequently used characters in common reading materials, and to communicate with Chinese on https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021C&course=CHIN211003
CHIN 231-001 Inter Rdg/Wrtg Chinese I Grace Mei-Hui Wu MW 10:15 AM-12:15 PM CHIN 231 is an intermediate reading and writing course designed for students at the ACTFL intermediate-mid reading and writing proficiency. The goal of this course is to reach the intermediate-high level of proficiency. This course concentrates on writing of muti-paragraph essays through the use of conventional rhetorical modes and standard grammatical structures. Students will be given ample time to think and to discuss (the crucial "brainstorming" phase) before writing. The course stresses content, culture and comparison and draws its content from assigned readings and evidence-based argument from texts and other stimuli such as Internet, newspapers and films. Restricted to fluent speakers who have only limited reading and writing ability. https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021C&course=CHIN231001
CHIN 311-001 Advanced Mod Chinese I Jiajia Wang MTWR 12:00 PM-01:00 PM Students learn to work on materials which were written or produced for native speakers, instead of the classroom materials that were written for the non-native speakers. The reading materials include a larger vocabulary with more idioms. Students will also learn how to understand and use certain oral expressions in conversation. They will learn ways to narrate, to describe, and to comment in native Chinese ways. Reading and audio materials are provided and discussed in the classes. Writing and oral presentations in Chinese are required in classroom under instruction. Students will be encouraged to practice oral communication with each other. https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021C&course=CHIN311001
CHIN 311-002 Advanced Mod Chinese I Jiajia Wang MTWR 01:45 PM-02:45 PM Students learn to work on materials which were written or produced for native speakers, instead of the classroom materials that were written for the non-native speakers. The reading materials include a larger vocabulary with more idioms. Students will also learn how to understand and use certain oral expressions in conversation. They will learn ways to narrate, to describe, and to comment in native Chinese ways. Reading and audio materials are provided and discussed in the classes. Writing and oral presentations in Chinese are required in classroom under instruction. Students will be encouraged to practice oral communication with each other. https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021C&course=CHIN311002
CHIN 361-001 Media Chinese I Mien-Hwa Chiang MW 01:45 PM-03:15 PM Chin 361 will help students improving their language skills, and enlarge vocabulary through reading online news on Chinese internet. The students will learn formal vocabulary and enhance their grammatical accuracy in the semester. Students are encouraged to explore Chinese government and company websites and Baidu Baike, so to conduct their own online search for both professional and academic purposes. Linguistic features in news headlines, accuracy of online translation tools, media censorship, social media usage will also be discussed in this class. The course goal is to help students gain Chinese media literacy by reading, browsing, and viewing online materials. https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021C&course=CHIN361001
CHIN 371-680 Adv Spoken Mandarin I Ye Tian MW 03:30 PM-05:00 PM This course is designed for students who have completed at least the intermediate level Chinese language course, or have studied the language for at least three years. The objective of this course is to consolidate the knowledge and skills students have acquired from their previous Mandarin Chinese classes and to enhance their oral expressive skills. By the end of the semester, students are expected to be able to carry on a conversation with a native Mandarin speaker on various common topics, including the current issues in China about its education, society, politics, culture, and history. Students will also learn how to gather information necessary for conducting oral presentations and speeches. Prior Language Experience Required https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021C&course=CHIN371680
CHIN 380-680 Advanced Medical Chinese Chih-Jen Lee MW 03:30 PM-05:00 PM Advanced Medical Chinese is a content-based course with curriculum adapted from the online course of New York University School of Medicine (NYUsom). It offers Mandarin training to medical/nursing students and other health professionals who may need to visit China or to serve limited English proficient Chinese-speaking patients. For physician/nurse-patients communication purposes, it is designed for students who have studied Chinese for three years or more in a regular college program or with the equivalent language proficiency and have studied medicine. Offered through the Penn Language Center. https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021C&course=CHIN380680
CHIN 381-001 Business Chinese I Mien-Hwa Chiang MW 10:15 AM-11:45 AM This course is aimed to enhance students' language skills in a business context and to promote their understanding about business environment and culture in contemporary China. The text is developed from real business cases from real multinational companies that have successfully embarked on the Chinese market. The forms of classes include lectures, drills on vocabulary and sentence patterns, and discussions. Class will be conducted in Chinese. In addition to the course textbook, students will learn to read business news in Chinese selected from Wall Street Journal. https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021C&course=CHIN381001
CHIN 381-002 Business Chinese I Jiajia Wang MW 03:30 PM-05:00 PM This course is aimed to enhance students' language skills in a business context and to promote their understanding about business environment and culture in contemporary China. The text is developed from real business cases from real multinational companies that have successfully embarked on the Chinese market. The forms of classes include lectures, drills on vocabulary and sentence patterns, and discussions. Class will be conducted in Chinese. In addition to the course textbook, students will learn to read business news in Chinese selected from Wall Street Journal. https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021C&course=CHIN381002
CHIN 381-680 Business Chinese I Jiajia Wang TR 05:15 PM-06:45 PM This course is aimed to enhance students' language skills in a business context and to promote their understanding about business environment and culture in contemporary China. The text is developed from real business cases from real multinational companies that have successfully embarked on the Chinese market. The forms of classes include lectures, drills on vocabulary and sentence patterns, and discussions. Class will be conducted in Chinese. In addition to the course textbook, students will learn to read business news in Chinese selected from Wall Street Journal. Prior Language Experience Required https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021C&course=CHIN381680
CHIN 411-001 Rdgs Mod Chinese I: Lit Maiheng Shen Dietrich TR 03:30 PM-05:00 PM This course is designed for students who have completed three years of college level Mandarin classes or equivalent. This course may be used to fulfill language or elective requirement for Chinese major or minor. The objectives of the course are 1) to help students gain an in-depth, multi-faceted and critical understanding of Chinese people, Chinese society and Chinese culture; 2) to facilitate students'acquisition of formal or written language; and 3) to develop students' analytical and critical thinking skills. These objectives are achieved primarily through 1) close reading and discussion of original literary texts by 20th -century Chinese writers; and 2) regular writing exercises. Students will also view several Chinese films that are related to the topics of the reading text. The class is to be conducted exclusively in Chinese. https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021C&course=CHIN411001
CHIN 481-001 Adv Business Chinese I: Adv Business Chinese I Mien-Hwa Chiang TR 10:15 AM-11:45 AM This content-based course provides students with the conceptual framework to understand issues China has been facing since its economic reform in 1978. Topics include WTO principles, the change of China's state-owned enterprises, China's economy in Mao's period, and the pros and cons of globalization. Students will be trained in reading financial articles, discussing international trades, conducting online research and giving business presentations. After the course, students will become more sophisticated in their understanding of China's economic development and in using Chinese business terminology at professional settings. The course assumes basic background in business and advanced level proficiency in Chinese language. The course is NOT open to freshman with no undergraduate business course. Course may be offered through Penn Language Center. https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021C&course=CHIN481001
CHIN 481-680 Adv Business Chinese I: Adv Business Chinese I Mien-Hwa Chiang MW 03:30 PM-05:00 PM This content-based course provides students with the conceptual framework to understand issues China has been facing since its economic reform in 1978. Topics include WTO principles, the change of China's state-owned enterprises, China's economy in Mao's period, and the pros and cons of globalization. Students will be trained in reading financial articles, discussing international trades, conducting online research and giving business presentations. After the course, students will become more sophisticated in their understanding of China's economic development and in using Chinese business terminology at professional settings. The course assumes basic background in business and advanced level proficiency in Chinese language. The course is NOT open to freshman with no undergraduate business course. Course may be offered through Penn Language Center. Prior Language Experience Required https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021C&course=CHIN481680
CHIN 491-401 1st Yr Classical Chin I Victor H Mair TR 01:45 PM-03:15 PM Introduction to the classical written language, beginning with Shadick, First Course in Literary Chinese. Students with a background in Japanese, Korean, Cantonese, Taiwanese, and other East Asian languages are welcome; it is not necessary to know Mandarin. The course begins from scratch, and swiftly but rigorously develops the ability to read a wide variety of classical and semi-classical styles. Original texts from the 6th century BC to the 20th century AD are studied. This course is taught in English and there are no prerequisites. EALC621401, EALC221401 Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
CHIN 721-401 Adv Classical Chinese I Paul Rakita Goldin W 05:15 PM-08:15 PM Close reading and interpretation of texts in various styles of classical Chinese drawn from the Han, Wei, Tang, and Song periods. Focus on strengthening students' reading ability in classical Chinese. Attention to questions of style, rhetoric, and syntax. EALC721401 https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021C&course=CHIN721401
EALC 001-001 Intro To Chinese Civiliz Ori Tavor MW 12:00 PM-01:00 PM Survey of the civilization of China from prehistoric times to the present. History & Tradition Sector
Cross Cultural Analysis
Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Registration also required for Recitation (see below)
https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021C&course=EALC001001
EALC 001-201 Introduction To Chinese Civilization F 10:15 AM-11:15 AM Survey of the civilization of China from prehistoric times to the present. Cross Cultural Analysis Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
EALC 001-202 Introduction To Chinese Civilization F 12:00 PM-01:00 PM Survey of the civilization of China from prehistoric times to the present. Cross Cultural Analysis Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
EALC 001-203 Introduction To Chinese Civilization F 12:00 PM-01:00 PM Survey of the civilization of China from prehistoric times to the present. Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
EALC 001-204 Introduction To Chinese Civilization F 01:45 PM-02:45 PM Survey of the civilization of China from prehistoric times to the present. Cross Cultural Analysis Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
EALC 001-205 Introduction To Chinese Civilization F 01:45 PM-02:45 PM Survey of the civilization of China from prehistoric times to the present. Cross Cultural Analysis Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
EALC 001-206 Introduction To Chinese Civilization F 03:30 PM-04:30 PM Survey of the civilization of China from prehistoric times to the present. Cross Cultural Analysis Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
EALC 015-401 Intro Buddhism Justin Mcdaniel M 01:45 PM-03:45 PM This course seeks to introduce students to the diversity of doctrines held and practices performed by Buddhists in Asia. By focusing on how specific beliefs and practices are tied to particular locations and particular times, we will be able to explore in detail the religious institutions, artistic, architectural, and musical traditions, textual production and legal and doctrinal developments of Buddhism over time and within its socio-historical context. Religion is never divorced from its place and its time. Furthermore, by geographically and historically grounding the study of these religions we will be able to examine how their individual ethic, cosmological and soteriological systems effect local history, economics, politics, and material culture. We will concentrate first on the person of the Buddha, his many biographies and how he has been followed and worshipped in a variety of ways from Lhasa, Tibet to Phrae, Thailand. From there we touch on the foundational teachings of the Buddha with an eye to how they have evolved and transformed over time. Finally, we focus on the practice of Buddhist ritual, magic and ethics in monasteries and among aly communities in Asia and even in the West. This section will confront the way Buddhists have thought of issues such as "Just-War," Women's Rights and Abortion. While no one quarter course could provide a detailed presentation of the beliefs and practices of Buddhism, my hope is that we will be able to look closely at certain aspects of these religions by focusing on how they are practiced in places like Nara, Japan or Vietnam, Laos. RELS173401, SAST142401 Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Registration also required for Recitation (see below)
EALC 015-402 Introduction To Buddhism Alexandra Kirby Sokolow F 12:00 PM-01:00 PM This course seeks to introduce students to the diversity of doctrines held and practices performed by Buddhists in Asia. By focusing on how specific beliefs and practices are tied to particular locations and particular times, we will be able to explore in detail the religious institutions, artistic, architectural, and musical traditions, textual production and legal and doctrinal developments of Buddhism over time and within its socio-historical context. Religion is never divorced from its place and its time. Furthermore, by geographically and historically grounding the study of these religions we will be able to examine how their individual ethic, cosmological and soteriological systems effect local history, economics, politics, and material culture. We will concentrate first on the person of the Buddha, his many biographies and how he has been followed and worshipped in a variety of ways from Lhasa, Tibet to Phrae, Thailand. From there we touch on the foundational teachings of the Buddha with an eye to how they have evolved and transformed over time. Finally, we focus on the practice of Buddhist ritual, magic and ethics in monasteries and among aly communities in Asia and even in the West. This section will confront the way Buddhists have thought of issues such as "Just-War," Women's Rights and Abortion. While no one quarter course could provide a detailed presentation of the beliefs and practices of Buddhism, my hope is that we will be able to look closely at certain aspects of these religions by focusing on how they are practiced in places like Nara, Japan or Vietnam, Laos. RELS173402, SAST142402 Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
EALC 015-403 Introduction To Buddhism Alexandra Kirby Sokolow F 12:00 PM-01:00 PM This course seeks to introduce students to the diversity of doctrines held and practices performed by Buddhists in Asia. By focusing on how specific beliefs and practices are tied to particular locations and particular times, we will be able to explore in detail the religious institutions, artistic, architectural, and musical traditions, textual production and legal and doctrinal developments of Buddhism over time and within its socio-historical context. Religion is never divorced from its place and its time. Furthermore, by geographically and historically grounding the study of these religions we will be able to examine how their individual ethic, cosmological and soteriological systems effect local history, economics, politics, and material culture. We will concentrate first on the person of the Buddha, his many biographies and how he has been followed and worshipped in a variety of ways from Lhasa, Tibet to Phrae, Thailand. From there we touch on the foundational teachings of the Buddha with an eye to how they have evolved and transformed over time. Finally, we focus on the practice of Buddhist ritual, magic and ethics in monasteries and among aly communities in Asia and even in the West. This section will confront the way Buddhists have thought of issues such as "Just-War," Women's Rights and Abortion. While no one quarter course could provide a detailed presentation of the beliefs and practices of Buddhism, my hope is that we will be able to look closely at certain aspects of these religions by focusing on how they are practiced in places like Nara, Japan or Vietnam, Laos. RELS173403, SAST142403 Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
EALC 015-404 Introduction To Buddhism Hallie Nell Calhoun Swanson F 12:00 PM-01:00 PM This course seeks to introduce students to the diversity of doctrines held and practices performed by Buddhists in Asia. By focusing on how specific beliefs and practices are tied to particular locations and particular times, we will be able to explore in detail the religious institutions, artistic, architectural, and musical traditions, textual production and legal and doctrinal developments of Buddhism over time and within its socio-historical context. Religion is never divorced from its place and its time. Furthermore, by geographically and historically grounding the study of these religions we will be able to examine how their individual ethic, cosmological and soteriological systems effect local history, economics, politics, and material culture. We will concentrate first on the person of the Buddha, his many biographies and how he has been followed and worshipped in a variety of ways from Lhasa, Tibet to Phrae, Thailand. From there we touch on the foundational teachings of the Buddha with an eye to how they have evolved and transformed over time. Finally, we focus on the practice of Buddhist ritual, magic and ethics in monasteries and among aly communities in Asia and even in the West. This section will confront the way Buddhists have thought of issues such as "Just-War," Women's Rights and Abortion. While no one quarter course could provide a detailed presentation of the beliefs and practices of Buddhism, my hope is that we will be able to look closely at certain aspects of these religions by focusing on how they are practiced in places like Nara, Japan or Vietnam, Laos. RELS173404, SAST142404 Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
EALC 015-405 Introduction To Buddhism Hallie Nell Calhoun Swanson F 12:00 PM-01:00 PM This course seeks to introduce students to the diversity of doctrines held and practices performed by Buddhists in Asia. By focusing on how specific beliefs and practices are tied to particular locations and particular times, we will be able to explore in detail the religious institutions, artistic, architectural, and musical traditions, textual production and legal and doctrinal developments of Buddhism over time and within its socio-historical context. Religion is never divorced from its place and its time. Furthermore, by geographically and historically grounding the study of these religions we will be able to examine how their individual ethic, cosmological and soteriological systems effect local history, economics, politics, and material culture. We will concentrate first on the person of the Buddha, his many biographies and how he has been followed and worshipped in a variety of ways from Lhasa, Tibet to Phrae, Thailand. From there we touch on the foundational teachings of the Buddha with an eye to how they have evolved and transformed over time. Finally, we focus on the practice of Buddhist ritual, magic and ethics in monasteries and among aly communities in Asia and even in the West. This section will confront the way Buddhists have thought of issues such as "Just-War," Women's Rights and Abortion. While no one quarter course could provide a detailed presentation of the beliefs and practices of Buddhism, my hope is that we will be able to look closely at certain aspects of these religions by focusing on how they are practiced in places like Nara, Japan or Vietnam, Laos. RELS173405, SAST142405 Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
EALC 025-001 Chinese Popular Culture Ori Tavor M 03:30 PM-06:30 PM This course explores the cultural landscapes of twentieth-century China and beyond through the lens of "popular culture." We will familiarize ourselves with some key approaches in modern cultural studies, while learning to critically interpret literary, musical, and visual texts in the Chinese-speaking world in social and historical context. Topics include orality and folk culture, media and mass culture, the local and the global, and politics and popular culture. We will emerge from the course with a new set of tools in thinking about "culture" both familiar and unfamiliar. No previous knowledge of Asia is required. Cross Cultural Analysis Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen. https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021C&course=EALC025001
EALC 041-401 Late Imperial China Si-Yen Fei MW 01:45 PM-03:15 PM From an Eurasian empire ruled by Mongols to an ethnically defined Han Chinese Ming dynasty, then again to a multi-ethnic empire ruled by a minority group of Manchus, the disruptions and transformations in the very idea of "China" in the past seven centuries defies our modern notion of China as a unitary nation with the world's longest continuous cultural tradition. How to understand the continuities and discontinuities of the last three imperial dynasties of China will be the central focus of our survey. How did these different ethnic groups adjust to each other's way of life? Did complicated cultural interaction prompt different visions of empires? How did the meaning of "Chinese change over this time period? How did international politics shape the fate of Chinese empires? With no assumption of prior knowledge, lectures open with an overview of Chinese society before the eve of the Mongolian invasion, and then trace the changing visions of ethnic and social orders in the subsequent regimes ruled by three different ethnic groups (Mongolian, Han Chinese, and Manchurian). We will examine and compare bureaucratic operations, cultural ideals, domestic and international policies from above as well as the daily life experiences from below. The course will conclude with an analysis of the collapse of the imperial order at the beginning of the twentieth century, after it was severely challenged by a semi-Christian Utopian movement from within and global drug trade imperialist attacks from without. HIST096401 Cross Cultural Analysis Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen. https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021C&course=EALC041401
EALC 079-401 The Religion of Anime Jolyon Thomas M 05:15 PM-06:15 PM
W 05:15 PM-08:15 PM
Be it shrine maidens, gods of death, and bodhisattvas fighting for justice; apocalypse, the afterlife, and apotheosis... the popular Japanese illustrated media of manga and anime are replete with religious characters and religious ideas. This course uses popular illustrated media as a tool for tracing the long history of how media and religion have been deeply intertwined in Japan. RELS079401 Arts & Letters Sector
Cross Cultural Analysis
Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Registration also required for Recitation (see below)
https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021C&course=EALC079401
EALC 079-402 The Religion of Anime Hallie Nell Calhoun Swanson F 10:15 AM-11:15 AM Be it shrine maidens, gods of death, and bodhisattvas fighting for justice; apocalypse, the afterlife, and apotheosis... the popular Japanese illustrated media of manga and anime are replete with religious characters and religious ideas. This course uses popular illustrated media as a tool for tracing the long history of how media and religion have been deeply intertwined in Japan. RELS079402 Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
EALC 079-403 The Religion of Anime Abdul Manan Bhat F 12:00 PM-01:00 PM Be it shrine maidens, gods of death, and bodhisattvas fighting for justice; apocalypse, the afterlife, and apotheosis... the popular Japanese illustrated media of manga and anime are replete with religious characters and religious ideas. This course uses popular illustrated media as a tool for tracing the long history of how media and religion have been deeply intertwined in Japan. RELS079403 Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
EALC 079-404 The Religion of Anime Alexandra Kirby Sokolow F 01:45 PM-02:45 PM Be it shrine maidens, gods of death, and bodhisattvas fighting for justice; apocalypse, the afterlife, and apotheosis... the popular Japanese illustrated media of manga and anime are replete with religious characters and religious ideas. This course uses popular illustrated media as a tool for tracing the long history of how media and religion have been deeply intertwined in Japan. RELS079404 Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
EALC 079-405 The Religion of Anime Alexandra Kirby Sokolow F 10:15 AM-11:15 AM Be it shrine maidens, gods of death, and bodhisattvas fighting for justice; apocalypse, the afterlife, and apotheosis... the popular Japanese illustrated media of manga and anime are replete with religious characters and religious ideas. This course uses popular illustrated media as a tool for tracing the long history of how media and religion have been deeply intertwined in Japan. RELS079405 Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
EALC 079-406 The Religion of Anime Hallie Nell Calhoun Swanson F 12:00 PM-01:00 PM Be it shrine maidens, gods of death, and bodhisattvas fighting for justice; apocalypse, the afterlife, and apotheosis... the popular Japanese illustrated media of manga and anime are replete with religious characters and religious ideas. This course uses popular illustrated media as a tool for tracing the long history of how media and religion have been deeply intertwined in Japan. RELS079406 Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
EALC 079-407 The Religion of Anime Abdul Manan Bhat F 01:45 PM-02:45 PM Be it shrine maidens, gods of death, and bodhisattvas fighting for justice; apocalypse, the afterlife, and apotheosis... the popular Japanese illustrated media of manga and anime are replete with religious characters and religious ideas. This course uses popular illustrated media as a tool for tracing the long history of how media and religion have been deeply intertwined in Japan. RELS079407 Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Crse Online: Sync & Async Components
Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
EALC 086-001 Korean Popular Culture Yoonbin Cho F 01:45 PM-04:45 PM "Korean Wave" (Hallyu) is currently raging throughout non-Western parts of the world, especially Asia, and may be making its way to the West. From South Korean tele-dramas and K-pop music to their respective celebrity icons, these popular cultural forms from Korea are increasingly becoming part of the everyday landscape and vocabulary. We will attempt to understand and evaluate this cultural phenomenon-its promises and limitations as well as its popularity and backlash against it. More specifically, this course explores the ways in which television, music, manhwa (comic books), and the internet participate in the transnational production and circulation of culture, modernity, tradition, ideology, and politics. Some of the more specific topics covered may include: Korean emotions and melodramas; imitation versus innovation in K-pop; fictions of history in period dramas; the marketing of new masculinity; revival of folk culture; preservation of traditional values in postmodern times; repatriation of Korean American pop stars to Korea; and youth culture. Requires outside viewing and listening. Cross Cultural Analysis Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
EALC 105-401 East Asian Diplomacy Frederick R. Dickinson MW 12:00 PM-01:00 PM Home to four of the five most populous states and four of the five largest economies, the Asia/Pacific is arguably the most dynamic region in the twenty-first century. At the same time, Cold War remnants (a divided Korea and China) and major geopolitical shifts (the rise of China and India, decline of the US and Japan) contribute significantly to the volatility of our world. This course will examine the political, economic, and geopolitical dynamism of the region through a survey of relations among the great powers in Asia from the sixteenth century to the present. Special emphasis will be given to regional and global developments from the perspective of the three principal East Asian states--China, Japan and Korea. We will explore the many informal, as well as formal, means of intercourse that have made East Asia what it is today. Graduate students (EALC 505) should consult graduate syllabus for graduate reading list, special recitation time and graduate requirements. EALC505401, HIST395401 Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Registration also required for Recitation (see below)
https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021C&course=EALC105401
EALC 105-402 East Asian Diplomacy F 12:00 PM-01:00 PM Home to four of the five most populous states and four of the five largest economies, the Asia/Pacific is arguably the most dynamic region in the twenty-first century. At the same time, Cold War remnants (a divided Korea and China) and major geopolitical shifts (the rise of China and India, decline of the US and Japan) contribute significantly to the volatility of our world. This course will examine the political, economic, and geopolitical dynamism of the region through a survey of relations among the great powers in Asia from the sixteenth century to the present. Special emphasis will be given to regional and global developments from the perspective of the three principal East Asian states--China, Japan and Korea. We will explore the many informal, as well as formal, means of intercourse that have made East Asia what it is today. Graduate students (EALC 505) should consult graduate syllabus for graduate reading list, special recitation time and graduate requirements. HIST395402 Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
EALC 105-403 East Asian Diplomacy F 12:00 PM-01:00 PM Home to four of the five most populous states and four of the five largest economies, the Asia/Pacific is arguably the most dynamic region in the twenty-first century. At the same time, Cold War remnants (a divided Korea and China) and major geopolitical shifts (the rise of China and India, decline of the US and Japan) contribute significantly to the volatility of our world. This course will examine the political, economic, and geopolitical dynamism of the region through a survey of relations among the great powers in Asia from the sixteenth century to the present. Special emphasis will be given to regional and global developments from the perspective of the three principal East Asian states--China, Japan and Korea. We will explore the many informal, as well as formal, means of intercourse that have made East Asia what it is today. Graduate students (EALC 505) should consult graduate syllabus for graduate reading list, special recitation time and graduate requirements. HIST395403 Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
EALC 105-404 East Asian Diplomacy F 01:45 PM-02:45 PM Home to four of the five most populous states and four of the five largest economies, the Asia/Pacific is arguably the most dynamic region in the twenty-first century. At the same time, Cold War remnants (a divided Korea and China) and major geopolitical shifts (the rise of China and India, decline of the US and Japan) contribute significantly to the volatility of our world. This course will examine the political, economic, and geopolitical dynamism of the region through a survey of relations among the great powers in Asia from the sixteenth century to the present. Special emphasis will be given to regional and global developments from the perspective of the three principal East Asian states--China, Japan and Korea. We will explore the many informal, as well as formal, means of intercourse that have made East Asia what it is today. Graduate students (EALC 505) should consult graduate syllabus for graduate reading list, special recitation time and graduate requirements. HIST395404 Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
EALC 105-405 East Asian Diplomacy R 05:15 PM-06:15 PM Home to four of the five most populous states and four of the five largest economies, the Asia/Pacific is arguably the most dynamic region in the twenty-first century. At the same time, Cold War remnants (a divided Korea and China) and major geopolitical shifts (the rise of China and India, decline of the US and Japan) contribute significantly to the volatility of our world. This course will examine the political, economic, and geopolitical dynamism of the region through a survey of relations among the great powers in Asia from the sixteenth century to the present. Special emphasis will be given to regional and global developments from the perspective of the three principal East Asian states--China, Japan and Korea. We will explore the many informal, as well as formal, means of intercourse that have made East Asia what it is today. Graduate students (EALC 505) should consult graduate syllabus for graduate reading list, special recitation time and graduate requirements. HIST395405 Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
EALC 105-406 East Asian Diplomacy R 05:15 PM-06:15 PM Home to four of the five most populous states and four of the five largest economies, the Asia/Pacific is arguably the most dynamic region in the twenty-first century. At the same time, Cold War remnants (a divided Korea and China) and major geopolitical shifts (the rise of China and India, decline of the US and Japan) contribute significantly to the volatility of our world. This course will examine the political, economic, and geopolitical dynamism of the region through a survey of relations among the great powers in Asia from the sixteenth century to the present. Special emphasis will be given to regional and global developments from the perspective of the three principal East Asian states--China, Japan and Korea. We will explore the many informal, as well as formal, means of intercourse that have made East Asia what it is today. Graduate students (EALC 505) should consult graduate syllabus for graduate reading list, special recitation time and graduate requirements. HIST395406 Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Permission Needed From Department
Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
EALC 127-401 Arts of China Nancy R S Steinhardt MWF 12:00 PM-01:00 PM A broad survey of Chinese architecture, sculpture, and painting from the Neolithic age through the nineteenth century. Topics include excavated material from China's Bronze Age, Chinese funerary arts, Buddhist caves and sculpture (including works in the University Museum), the Chinese city, the Chinese garden, and major masterpieces of Chinese painting. Prerequisite: Graduate students may take this course as EALC 527 and should see the instructor to discuss additional requirements for graduate credit. ARTH214401, ARTH614401, EALC527401 Registration also required for Recitation (see below) https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021C&course=EALC127401
EALC 127-402 Arts of China Mo Zhang F 10:15 AM-11:15 AM A broad survey of Chinese architecture, sculpture, and painting from the Neolithic age through the nineteenth century. Topics include excavated material from China's Bronze Age, Chinese funerary arts, Buddhist caves and sculpture (including works in the University Museum), the Chinese city, the Chinese garden, and major masterpieces of Chinese painting. Prerequisite: Graduate students may take this course as EALC 527 and should see the instructor to discuss additional requirements for graduate credit. EALC527402, ARTH214402 Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
EALC 127-403 Arts of China Mo Zhang F 12:00 PM-01:00 PM A broad survey of Chinese architecture, sculpture, and painting from the Neolithic age through the nineteenth century. Topics include excavated material from China's Bronze Age, Chinese funerary arts, Buddhist caves and sculpture (including works in the University Museum), the Chinese city, the Chinese garden, and major masterpieces of Chinese painting. Prerequisite: Graduate students may take this course as EALC 527 and should see the instructor to discuss additional requirements for graduate credit. EALC527403, ARTH214403 Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
EALC 131-401 Intro Class Chinese Thgt Paul Rakita Goldin TR 12:00 PM-01:30 PM This course is intended as an introduction to the foundational thinkers of Chinese civilization, who flourished from the fifth to the second centuries B.C. No knowledge of Chinese is presumed, and there are no prerequisites, although EALC 001 (Introduction to Chinese Civilization) is recommended. Graduate students may take this course as EALC 531 and should see the instructor to discuss requirements for graduate credit. (Undergraduates must enroll in the courses as EALC 131.) EALC531401 History & Tradition Sector https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021C&course=EALC131401
EALC 152-401 Love&Loss:Jpns Lit Trad Linda H. Chance TR 03:30 PM-05:00 PM How do people make sense of the multiple experiences that the simple words "love" and "loss" imply? How do they express their thoughts and feelings to one another? In this course, we will explore some means Japanese culture has found to grapple with these events and sensations. We will also see how these culturally sanctioned frameworks have shaped the ways Japanese view love and loss. Our materials will sample the literary tradition of Japan from earliest times to the early modern and even modern periods. Close readings of a diverse group of texts, including poetry, narrative, theater, and the related arts of calligraphy, painting, and music will structure our inquiry. The class will take an expedition to nearby Woodlands Cemetery to experience poetry in nature. By the end of the course, you should be able to appreciate texts that differ slightly in their value systems, linguistic expressions, and aesthetic sensibilities from those that you may already know. Among the available project work that you may select, if you have basic Japanese, is learning to read a literary manga. All shared class material is in English translation. GSWS152401, EALC552401 Arts & Letters Sector
Cross Cultural Analysis
Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
EALC 183-401 Rdgs in Korean History CANCELED Over the last few decades, a substantial volume of the ethnographic studies of the ethnographic studies of South Korea has produced. Providing critical insight into South Korea's quite particular and transforming history and cultures of modernization, industrialization, and globalization, these ethnographic works help us understand many of the historical, political, and economic issues that have both defined and complicated modern Korean society and nationhood. In this course, we will explore the contemporary social and cultural life in South Korea through ethnographies. Major themes include modernization, capitalism, class, gender, family, religion, globalization, and popular culture. Cross Cultural Analysis Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
EALC 196-401 The Vietnam War Arthur Waldron TR 10:15 AM-11:45 AM HIST391401
EALC 211-401 Life/Death in Han China Nancy R S Steinhardt M 01:45 PM-04:45 PM Using maps, city-panning, architecture, wall painting, sculpture, and minor arts as evidence, the course will examine the attitudes toward life and death in Han (206 BCE-AD 220) China. EALC611401 https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021C&course=EALC211401
EALC 221-401 1st Yr Classical Chin I Victor H Mair TR 01:45 PM-03:15 PM Introduction to the classical written language, beginning with Shadick, First Course in Literary Chinese. Students with a background in Japanese, Korean, Cantonese, Taiwanese, and other East Asian languages are welcome; it is not necessary to know Mandarin. The course begins from scratch, and swiftly but rigorously develops the ability to read a wide variety of classical and semi-classical styles. Original texts from the 6th century BC to the 20th century AD are studied. This course is taught in English and there are no prerequisites. EALC621401, CHIN491401 Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
EALC 223-401 Lang/Script/Soc in China Victor H Mair TR 08:30 AM-10:00 AM The Chinese writing system is the only major surviving script in the world that is partially picto-ideographic, Egyptian hieroglyphic and Sumero-Akkadian cuneiform having passed out of use about two millennia ago. Partly because it is so unique, a tremendous number of myths have grown up around the Chinese script. In an attempt to understand how they really function, this seminar will examine the nature of the sinographs and their relationship to spoken Sinitic languages, as well as their implications for society and culture. We will also discuss the artistic and technological aspects of the Chinese characters and the ongoing efforts to reform and simplify them. The use of sinographs in other East Asian countries than China will be taken into account. There are no prerequisites for this class. EALC623401 Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
EALC 224-401 China's Last Emp/Qing Christopher Pratt Atwood MW 10:15 AM-11:15 AM In 1800, Beijing ruled the world's biggest, wealthiest, and most powerful empire. The Emperor, ruler of China's Qing dynasty, was a sage monarch, a Confucian scholar, even a Bodhisattva on the throne, but his not too distant ancestors had been hunters, ginseng smugglers, and soldiers of fortune in the forests of Manchuria speaking Manchu-a language closer to Mongolian and Turkish than to Chinese. This course will explore how the military organization of these dissident chiefs in the forest came to command all the resources of Chinese statecraft, scholarship, and economy and how by yoking these Chinese management skills to the Manchu "frontier style" built arguably the most successful empire in Asian history. EALC624401 https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021C&course=EALC224401
EALC 224-402 China's Last Empire: the Qing F 10:15 AM-11:15 AM In 1800, Beijing ruled the world's biggest, wealthiest, and most powerful empire. The Emperor, ruler of China's Qing dynasty, was a sage monarch, a Confucian scholar, even a Bodhisattva on the throne, but his not too distant ancestors had been hunters, ginseng smugglers, and soldiers of fortune in the forests of Manchuria speaking Manchu-a language closer to Mongolian and Turkish than to Chinese. This course will explore how the military organization of these dissident chiefs in the forest came to command all the resources of Chinese statecraft, scholarship, and economy and how by yoking these Chinese management skills to the Manchu "frontier style" built arguably the most successful empire in Asian history. EALC624402
EALC 225-401 Ne Asian Archaeology Nancy R S Steinhardt CANCELED This seminar explores the major civilizations of Northeast Asia (Beijing, Northern Hebei, Liaoning, Jilin, Heilongjiang, Korea, and Eastern Mongolia; and in the early period, Japan) from the early CE centuries through the seventeenth. The sources of evidence are archaeological sites, palaces, monasteries, tombs, and excavated objects. EALC625401
EALC 236-401 Chinese Art/Penn Museum Adam D Smith TR 03:30 PM-05:00 PM This class is an opportunity to work closely with the Chinese sculpture, paintings, bronzes and other works of art in the collection of the Penn Museum. Some of the objects are well-known and on permanent display. Others have hardly been researched since they were acquired, and rarely leave storage. The class will meet in small groups at the museum. Students will work on research papers and collaborative in-class presentations on objects of their choice. A variety of approaches will be encouraged and students may choose to focus on iconography, historical and religious context, materials and manufacturing techniques, collectors and patronage, or inscriptions. There are no prerequisites for this course. EALC636401 Cross Cultural Analysis Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
EALC 261-401 Japanese Science Fiction Kathryn Hemmann CANCELED This course will provide an overview of the major tropes, themes, and interpretations of contemporary Japanese science fiction and fantasy. As we establish a foundational knowledge of the history and structural formulations of genre fiction in Japan, we will cover topics such as folklore, high fantasy, apocalypse, dystopia, magical realism, posthumanism, video games, and transnational media franchises and cross-cultural marketing. By the end of the semester, students will possess a deeper understanding and appreciation of the role that science fiction and fantasy play in shaping contemporary media cultures in Japan and around the world. EALC662401
EALC 264-401 Law & Violence David Spafford MW 10:15 AM-11:45 AM This course will be an exploration of premodern Japanese history through the lens of violence. The centuries under consideration (roughly, the eighth thought nineteenth) were characterized by greatly varying levels of violence, both of the state-sanctioned variety (war, punishments for law-breakers and political losers) and of the non-sanctioned variety (piracy, banditry, warrior and peasant rebellions). Examining a wide variety of translated sources, from diaries to chronicles, from legal codes to fiction, we shall examine the changing social, political, economic, and cultural contexts of violence, in order to interrogate not only why certain periods were remarkably peaceful while others were not, but also why violence took different forms in relation to different circumstances. We shall consider how contempories made sense of the violence that surrounded them (or didn't) and how they divided the acceptable use of force from the wanton and society-threatening abuse of it. The course will feature presentations and severl (very short) papers. EALC664401 https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021C&course=EALC264401
EALC 293-401 Intro Classical Mongol Narantsetseg Tseveendulam T 01:45 PM-04:45 PM In this class students who already know some modern Mongolian in the Cyrillic script will learn how to transfer that knowledge to the reading of first post-classical, and then classical texts written in the vertical or Uyghur-Mongolian script. Topics covered will include the Mongolian alphabetic script, dealing with ambiguous readings, scholarly transcription, vowel harmony and syllable structure, post-classical and classical forms of major declensions, converbs, verbal nouns, and finite verbs, syntax, pronunciation and scribal readings. Readings will be adjusted to interests, but as a rule will include selections from short stories, diaries, chronicles, Buddhist translations, government documents, popular didactic poetry, ritual texts, and traditional narratives. Students will also be introduced to the most important reference works helpful in reading classical and post-classical Mongolian. One year of modern Mongolian or equivalent required to enroll. EALC693401
EALC 442-401 Issues in Chinese Hist Arthur Waldron T 05:15 PM-08:15 PM HIST412401
EALC 501-301 Chinese History & Civ Ori Tavor F 01:45 PM-04:45 PM This seminar offers a thematic overview of the academic study of Chinese history from the Neolithic period to the 21st century. Over the course of the semester, students will be introduced to different scholarly approaches to the study of history through a close reading and analysis of the work of leading scholars in the field of Sinology. We will learn about the various subfields in the study of history, such as cultural history, social history, administrative and legal history, intellectual history, history of religion, literary history, history of gender, world history, and historiography, examine their different methodological frameworks and tools, and draw on them in order to problematize and enrich our understanding of Chinese culture. In addition, this seminar will provide incoming students with the relevant tools to produce original graduate-level research on all aspects of Chinese history, society, and culture and present it in a clear and persuasive fashion orally and in written form. While original-language research for the final project is encouraged, all course materials will be in English. Prerequisite: Course intended for first year MA and PhD students. Undergraduates need permission. Cross Cultural Analysis Undergraduates Need Permission https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021C&course=EALC501301
EALC 502-301 Japanese History & Civ Ayako Kano W 01:45 PM-04:45 PM This seminar introduces students to the graduate-level study of Japan. In addition to getting a broad overview of Japanese culture, students in the course will develop familiarity with major debates in the history of the field of Japanese studies. The course also provides basic training in using primary and secondary sources in Japanese, Japanese bibliographic conventions, and other skills necessary for pursuing advanced research or a teaching career in the field. Open to all graduate students and to undergraduates with permission from the instructor. Familiarity with Japanese language is a plus but is not required. https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021C&course=EALC502301
EALC 505-401 East Asian Diplomacy Frederick R. Dickinson MW 12:00 PM-01:00 PM This course will survey recent scholarship on East Asian diplomacy from the sixteenth century to the present. We will engage several fundamental debates about the relationship between China, Japan, Korea and the outer world and introduce not only orthodox diplomatic analyses but also newer approaches to modern China, Japan and Korea by international and global historians. HIST395401, EALC105401 Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Permission Needed From Instructor
Registration also required for Recitation (see below)
https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021C&course=EALC505401
EALC 505-407 East Asian Diplomacy This course will survey recent scholarship on East Asian diplomacy from the sixteenth century to the present. We will engage several fundamental debates about the relationship between China, Japan, Korea and the outer world and introduce not only orthodox diplomatic analyses but also newer approaches to modern China, Japan and Korea by international and global historians. HIST395407 Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
EALC 527-401 Arts of China Nancy R S Steinhardt MWF 12:00 PM-01:00 PM A broad survey of Chinese architecture, sculpture, and painting from the Neolithic age through the nineteenth century. Topics include excavated material from China's Bronze Age, Chinese funerary arts, Buddhist caves and sculpture (including works in the University Museum), the Chinese city, the Chinese garden, and major masterpieces of Chinese painting. ARTH214401, ARTH614401, EALC127401 Registration also required for Recitation (see below) https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021C&course=EALC527401
EALC 527-402 Arts of China Mo Zhang F 10:15 AM-11:15 AM A broad survey of Chinese architecture, sculpture, and painting from the Neolithic age through the nineteenth century. Topics include excavated material from China's Bronze Age, Chinese funerary arts, Buddhist caves and sculpture (including works in the University Museum), the Chinese city, the Chinese garden, and major masterpieces of Chinese painting. ARTH214402, EALC127402 Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
EALC 527-403 Arts of China Mo Zhang F 12:00 PM-01:00 PM A broad survey of Chinese architecture, sculpture, and painting from the Neolithic age through the nineteenth century. Topics include excavated material from China's Bronze Age, Chinese funerary arts, Buddhist caves and sculpture (including works in the University Museum), the Chinese city, the Chinese garden, and major masterpieces of Chinese painting. EALC127403, ARTH214403 Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
EALC 531-401 Intro Class Chinese Thgt Paul Rakita Goldin TR 12:00 PM-01:30 PM This course is intended as an introduction to the foundational thinkers of Chinese civilization, who flourished from the fifth to the second centuries B.C. No knowledge of Chinese is presumed, and there are no prerequisites, although EALC 001 (Introduction to Chinese Civilization) is recommended. Graduate students may take this course as EALC 531 and should see the instructor to discuss requirements for graduate credit. (Undergraduates must enroll in the course as EALC 131.) EALC131401 https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021C&course=EALC531401
EALC 552-401 Love&Loss:Jpns Lit Trad Linda H. Chance TR 03:30 PM-05:00 PM How do people make sense of the multiple experiences that the simple words "love" and "loss" imply? How do they express their thoughts and feelings to one another? In this course, we will explore some means Japanese culture has found to grapple with these events and sensations. We will also see how these culturally sanctioned frameworks have shaped the ways Japanese view love and loss. Our materials will sample the literary tradition of Japan from earliest times to the early modern and even modern periods. Close readings of a diverse group of texts, including poetry, narrative, theater, and the related arts of calligraphy, painting, and music will structure our inquiry. The class will take an expedition to nearby Woodlands Cemetery to experience poetry in nature. By the end of the course, you should be able to appreciate texts that differ slightly in their value systems, linguistic expressions, and aesthetic sensibilities from those that you may already know. Among the available project work that you may select, if you have basic Japanese, is learning to read a literary manga. All shared class material is in English translation. Research in an East Asian language required for graduate credit. GSWS152401, EALC152401 Cross Cultural Analysis
EALC 611-401 Life/Death in Han China Nancy R S Steinhardt M 01:45 PM-04:45 PM Using wall painting, sculpture, and minor arts as evidence, the course will examine the attitudes toward life and beliefs and death in Han (206 B.C.-A.D.220) China. EALC211401 https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021C&course=EALC611401
EALC 621-401 1st Yr Classical Chin I Victor H Mair TR 01:45 PM-03:15 PM Introduction to the classical written language, beginning with Shadick, First Course in Literary Chinese. Students with a background in Japanese, Korean, Cantonese, Taiwanese, and other East Asian languages are welcome; it is not necessary to know Mandarin. The course begins from scratch, and swiftly but rigorously develops the ability to read a wide variety of classical and semi-classical styles. Original texts from the 6th century BC to the 20th century AD are studied. This course is taught in English and there are no prerequisites. CHIN491401, EALC221401 Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Undergraduates Need Permission
EALC 623-401 Lang/Script/Soc in China Victor H Mair TR 08:30 AM-10:00 AM The Chinese writing system is the only major surviving script in the world that is partially picto-ideographic, Egyptian hieroglyphic and Sumero-Akkadian cuneiform having passed out of use about two millennia ago. Partly because it is so unique, a tremendous number of myths have grown up around the Chinese script. In an attempt to understand how they really function, this seminar will examine the nature of the sinographs and their relationship to spoken Sinitic languages, as well as their implications for society and culture. We will also discuss the artistic and technological aspects of the Chinese characters and the ongoing efforts to reform and simplify them. The use of sinographs in other East Asian countries than China will be taken into account. There are no prerequisites for this class. EALC223401
EALC 624-401 China's Last Emp/Qing Christopher Pratt Atwood MW 10:15 AM-11:15 AM In 1800, Beijing ruled the world's biggest, wealthiest, and most powerful empire. The Emperor, ruler of China's Qing dynasty, was a sage monarch, a Confucian scholar, even a Bodhisattva on the throne. But his not too distant ancestors had been hunters, ginseng smugglers, and soldiers of fortune in the forests of Manchuria speaking Manchu-a language closer to Mongolian and Turkish than to Chinese. This course will explore how the military organization of these dissident chiefs in the forest came to command all the resources of Chinese statecraft, scholarship, and economy and how by yoking these Chinese management skills to the Manchu "frontier style" built arguably the most successful empire in Asian history. EALC224401 Registration also required for Recitation (see below) https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021C&course=EALC624401
EALC 624-402 China's Last Empire: the Qing F 10:15 AM-11:15 AM In 1800, Beijing ruled the world's biggest, wealthiest, and most powerful empire. The Emperor, ruler of China's Qing dynasty, was a sage monarch, a Confucian scholar, even a Bodhisattva on the throne. But his not too distant ancestors had been hunters, ginseng smugglers, and soldiers of fortune in the forests of Manchuria speaking Manchu-a language closer to Mongolian and Turkish than to Chinese. This course will explore how the military organization of these dissident chiefs in the forest came to command all the resources of Chinese statecraft, scholarship, and economy and how by yoking these Chinese management skills to the Manchu "frontier style" built arguably the most successful empire in Asian history. EALC224402 Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
EALC 625-401 Ne Asian Archaeology Nancy R S Steinhardt CANCELED This seminar explores the major civilizations of Northeast Asia (Beijing, Northern Hebei, Liaoning, Jilin, Heilongjiang, Korea, and Eastern Mongolia; and in the early period, Japan) from the early CE centuries through the seventeenth. The sources of evidence are archaeological sites, palaces, monasteries, tombs, and excavated objects. EALC225401
EALC 636-401 Chinese Art/Penn Museum Adam D Smith TR 03:30 PM-05:00 PM EALC236401 Cross Cultural Analysis Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
EALC 662-401 Japanese Science Fiction Kathryn Hemmann CANCELED This course will provide an overview of the major tropes, themes, and interpretations of contemporary Japanese science fiction and fantasy. As we establish a foundational knowledge of the history and structural formulations of genre fiction in Japan, we will cover topics such as folklore, high fantasy, apocalypse, dystopia, magical realism, posthumanism, video games, and transnational media franchises and cross-cultural marketing. By the end of the semester, students will possess a deeper understanding and appreciation of the role that science fiction and fantasy play in shaping contemporary media cultures in Japan and around the world. EALC261401
EALC 664-401 Law & Violence David Spafford MW 10:15 AM-11:45 AM This course will be an exploration of premodern Japanese history through the lens of violence. The centuries under consideration (roughly, the eighth thought nineteenth) were characterized by greatly varying levels of violence, both of the state-sanctioned variety (war, punishments for law-breakers and political losers) and of the non-sanctioned variety (piracy, banditry, warrior and peasant rebellions). Examining a wide variety of translated sources, from diaries to chronicles, from legal codes to fiction, we shall examine the changing social, political, economic, and cultural contexts of violence, in order to interrogate not only why certain periods were remarkably peaceful while others were not, but also why violence took different forms in relation to different circumstances. We shall consider how contempories made sense of the violence that surrounded them (or didn't) and how they divided the acceptable use of force from the wanton and society-threatening abuse of it. The course will feature presentations and several (very short) papers. EALC264401 https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021C&course=EALC664401
EALC 693-401 Intro Classical Mongol Narantsetseg Tseveendulam T 01:45 PM-04:45 PM In this class students who already know some modern Mongolian in the Cyrillic script will learn how to transfer that knowledge to the reading of first post-classical, and then classical texts written in the vertical or Uyghur-Mongolian script. Topics covered will include the Mongolian alphabetic script, dealing with ambiguous readings, scholarly transcription, vowel harmony and syllable structure, post-classical and classical forms of major declensions, converbs, verbal nouns, and finite verbs, syntax, pronunciation and scribal readings. Readings will be adjusted to interests, but as a rule will include selections from short stories, diaries, chronicles, Buddhist translations, government documents, popular didactic poetry, ritual texts, and traditional narratives. Students will also be introduced to the most important reference works helpful in reading classical and post-classical Mongolian. One year of modern Mongolian or equivalent required to enroll. EALC293401
EALC 721-401 Adv Classical Chinese I Paul Rakita Goldin W 05:15 PM-08:15 PM Close reading and interpretation of texts in various styles of classical Chinese drawn from the Han, Wei, Tang, and Song periods. Focus on strengthening students' reading ability in classical Chinese. Attention to questions of style, rhetoric, and syntax. CHIN721401 https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021C&course=EALC721401
EALC 745-301 Topics Song Dynasty Hist Brian T Vivier CANCELED "This seminar will introduce graduate students to current scholarship on the Song dynasty (960-1276) by surveying both classic and recent work in the field. Students will gain a foundation in how historians have interpreted theSong period and learn the major debates within the field. Readings will be principally in English, and no background in Chinese studies is required." This seminar will introduce graduate students to current scholarship on the Song dynasty (960-1276) by surveying both classic and recent work in the field. Students will gain a foundation in how historians have interpreted the Song period and learn the major debates within the field. Readings will be principally in English, and no background in Chinese studies is required.
EALC 749-301 Japanese For Sinologists Linda H. Chance TR 10:15 AM-11:45 AM An accelerated course in scholarly Japanese for Sinologists and others with a knowledge of Chinese characters. Prerequisite: Knowledge of Chinese characters.
JPAN 001-680 Intro To Spoken Japan I Lewis E Harrington MW 05:15 PM-07:15 PM Intended for students who have no Japanese background. The major emphasis is on oral communication skills, although some reading and writing instructions are given. Japanese pop-culture will also be incorporated. Prerequisite: See LPS Course Guide. **This course does not fulfill the language requirements the College. https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021C&course=JPAN001680
JPAN 011-001 Beginning Japanese I Chihiro Hanami MTW 10:15 AM-11:15 AM
R 10:15 AM-11:45 AM
Intended for students who have no Japanese background. All four skills, speaking/listening/writing/reading, are equally emphasized. Hiragana/Katakana (Two sets of Japanese syllabic letters) and some Chinese characters (Kanji) are introduced. Textbooks: Genki I (Lesson 1- Lesson 7). Kanji: reproduction-approx.70/recognitio-approx.110 Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen. https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021C&course=JPAN011001
JPAN 011-002 Beginning Japanese I Chihiro Hanami MTW 12:00 PM-01:00 PM
R 12:00 PM-01:30 PM
Intended for students who have no Japanese background. All four skills, speaking/listening/writing/reading, are equally emphasized. Hiragana/Katakana (Two sets of Japanese syllabic letters) and some Chinese characters (Kanji) are introduced. Textbooks: Genki I (Lesson 1- Lesson 7). Kanji: reproduction-approx.70/recognitio-approx.110 Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen. https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021C&course=JPAN011002
JPAN 011-003 Beginning Japanese I Nana Takeda MTW 01:45 PM-02:45 PM
R 01:45 PM-03:15 PM
Intended for students who have no Japanese background. All four skills, speaking/listening/writing/reading, are equally emphasized. Hiragana/Katakana (Two sets of Japanese syllabic letters) and some Chinese characters (Kanji) are introduced. Textbooks: Genki I (Lesson 1- Lesson 7). Kanji: reproduction-approx.70/recognitio-approx.110 Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen. https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021C&course=JPAN011003
JPAN 011-004 Beginning Japanese I Chihiro Hanami MTW 03:30 PM-04:30 PM
R 03:30 PM-05:00 PM
Intended for students who have no Japanese background. All four skills, speaking/listening/writing/reading, are equally emphasized. Hiragana/Katakana (Two sets of Japanese syllabic letters) and some Chinese characters (Kanji) are introduced. Textbooks: Genki I (Lesson 1- Lesson 7). Kanji: reproduction-approx.70/recognitio-approx.110 Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen. https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021C&course=JPAN011004
JPAN 021-001 Inten Beg Japanese I Akiko Takamura Barnes MTWRF 10:15 AM-11:45 AM Intended for students who have little or no background in Japanese who wish to finish the language requirement in one year. This is equivalent to Beginning Japanese I & II in one semester, 2 CU. Textbooks: Genki I (Lesson 1-Lesson 12) and Genki II (Lesson 13-Lesson 14) Kanji: reproduction-approx.170/recognitio-approx.250 Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen. https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021C&course=JPAN021001
JPAN 111-001 Beginning Japanese IIi Nana Takeda MTW 10:15 AM-11:15 AM
R 10:15 AM-11:45 AM
This course is a continuation of Beginning Japanese II and focuses on the development of the elementary grammatical structures of the Japanese language through aural-oral practices. The course also aims to develop the four basic skills: listening, speaking, reading, and writing. The course also introduces aspects of Japanese culture and customs, knowledge that is necessary for behaving in a socio-culturally appropriate manner. Students will learn and practice skills to communicate in situations they might face in real life. Example topics and functions are travel, part-time job, work, asking for favors, asking permission, stating your intension/opinion, reporting what you heard, and various speech styles including Keigo (respectful speech).Textbooks: Genki II (Lesson 15- Lesson 21) will be covered, and around 100 new Kanji will be introduced. Overall kanji knowledge will be 286. https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021C&course=JPAN111001
JPAN 111-002 Beginning Japanese IIi Megumu Tamura MTW 12:00 PM-01:00 PM
R 12:00 PM-01:30 PM
This course is a continuation of Beginning Japanese II and focuses on the development of the elementary grammatical structures of the Japanese language through aural-oral practices. The course also aims to develop the four basic skills: listening, speaking, reading, and writing. The course also introduces aspects of Japanese culture and customs, knowledge that is necessary for behaving in a socio-culturally appropriate manner. Students will learn and practice skills to communicate in situations they might face in real life. Example topics and functions are travel, part-time job, work, asking for favors, asking permission, stating your intension/opinion, reporting what you heard, and various speech styles including Keigo (respectful speech).Textbooks: Genki II (Lesson 15- Lesson 21) will be covered, and around 100 new Kanji will be introduced. Overall kanji knowledge will be 286. https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021C&course=JPAN111002
JPAN 111-003 Beginning Japanese IIi Megumu Tamura MTW 01:45 PM-02:45 PM
R 01:45 PM-03:15 PM
This course is a continuation of Beginning Japanese II and focuses on the development of the elementary grammatical structures of the Japanese language through aural-oral practices. The course also aims to develop the four basic skills: listening, speaking, reading, and writing. The course also introduces aspects of Japanese culture and customs, knowledge that is necessary for behaving in a socio-culturally appropriate manner. Students will learn and practice skills to communicate in situations they might face in real life. Example topics and functions are travel, part-time job, work, asking for favors, asking permission, stating your intension/opinion, reporting what you heard, and various speech styles including Keigo (respectful speech).Textbooks: Genki II (Lesson 15- Lesson 21) will be covered, and around 100 new Kanji will be introduced. Overall kanji knowledge will be 286. https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021C&course=JPAN111003
JPAN 211-001 Intermediate Japanese I Megumu Tamura MTWR 10:15 AM-11:15 AM A continuation of Japanese language beyond the language requirement. Textbooks: Tobira: Gateway to Advanced Japanese (Unit 4-Unit 8) Kanji:reproduction-approx.400/recognitio-approx.550 https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021C&course=JPAN211001
JPAN 311-001 Intermed Japanese IIi Tomoko Takami MW 10:15 AM-11:45 AM This course is a continuation of Japanese language at the upper intermediate level, and authentic materials and video clips will be used. https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021C&course=JPAN311001
JPAN 381-680 Japanese/Professions I Tomoko Takami MW 03:30 PM-05:00 PM An intermediate level course of Japanese language focusing on workplace-related topics. Intended for students who will use Japanese in the professions. Textbook: Powering Up Your Japanese Through Case Studies: Intermediate and Advanced Japanese. Prerequisite: Offered through Penn Language Center. Prior Language Experience Required https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021C&course=JPAN381680
JPAN 411-001 Advanced Japanese I Tomoko Takami MW 12:00 PM-01:30 PM Minimum 600 - 700 kanji knowledge is expected. A continuation of Japanese language beyond the intermediate level. https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021C&course=JPAN411001
JPAN 481-680 Advanced Proficiency I Chihiro Hanami MW 01:45 PM-03:15 PM This course is for students with an advanced background in Japanese, who are interested in taking at least the Level 2 Japanese Proficiency Test. Solid grammar, an extensive vocabulary, and the knowledge of at least 800-900 Chinese characters is required. This course is not continuous with any existing intermediate or advanced-level Japanese course; therefore, your grade from any of those courses does not qualify you to take this class. Eligibility will be determined through an interview and placement test taken in the first meeting. All students who take this course are required to take the Japanese Proficiency Test in December. Since the JLPT is administered in December every year, if you wish to fully prepare for the test, the instructor strongly recommends that you take Advanced Proficiency II in the same calendar year. For example, if you plan to take the test in December, take Advanced Proficiency II the prior spring and take Advanced Proficiency I in the fall. Different from other courses, this full-year course begins in the spring and ends in the fall, because the test is given in December. However, participation in 482 is optional. Prior Language Experience Required https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021C&course=JPAN481680
JPAN 511-001 Rdgs Advanced Japanese I Ayako Kano TR 10:15 AM-11:45 AM Readings in advanced literary and journalistic texts written in modern Japanese. https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021C&course=JPAN511001
KORN 001-680 1st Yr Spoken Korean I Siwon Lee MW 05:15 PM-06:45 PM This class is for those that have little to no knowledge of Korean. The main focus is the development of Korean communication skills by exploring a variety of everyday topics beyond school settings. Students will improve their Korean communication skills by engaging in a variety of interactive activities, role plays, and presentations. Class topics include, but are not limited to, introducing oneself, describing one's surroundings, discussing daily activities and past events, talking about common objects and people, etc. We will also introduce cultural topics in order to deepen students' understanding of Korea's culture and language. NOTE: This course does not count toward the language requirement or the EALC major or minor. Offered through the Penn Language Center.
KORN 011-001 Elementary Korean I Haewon Cho M 12:00 PM-01:00 PM
TW 12:00 PM-01:30 PM
This course is designed for students who have little or no knowledge of Korean. This course aims to develop foundational reading, writing, listening, and speaking skills through meaningful communicative activities and tasks. Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to comprehend and carry on simple daily conversations and create simple sentences in the past, present, and future tenses. Students will learn how to introduce themselves, describe their surroundings, talk about daily lives, friends and relatives, and talk about past and future events. Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen. https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021C&course=KORN011001
KORN 011-002 Elementary Korean I Eunae Kim M 01:45 PM-02:45 PM
T 01:45 PM-03:15 PM
W 01:45 PM-03:15 PM
This course is designed for students who have little or no knowledge of Korean. This course aims to develop foundational reading, writing, listening, and speaking skills through meaningful communicative activities and tasks. Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to comprehend and carry on simple daily conversations and create simple sentences in the past, present, and future tenses. Students will learn how to introduce themselves, describe their surroundings, talk about daily lives, friends and relatives, and talk about past and future events. Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
KORN 011-003 Elementary Korean I Eunae Kim TR 03:30 PM-05:30 PM This course is designed for students who have little or no knowledge of Korean. This course aims to develop foundational reading, writing, listening, and speaking skills through meaningful communicative activities and tasks. Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to comprehend and carry on simple daily conversations and create simple sentences in the past, present, and future tenses. Students will learn how to introduce themselves, describe their surroundings, talk about daily lives, friends and relatives, and talk about past and future events. Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
KORN 011-004 Elementary Korean I T 10:15 AM-11:15 AM
WR 10:15 AM-11:45 AM
This course is designed for students who have little or no knowledge of Korean. This course aims to develop foundational reading, writing, listening, and speaking skills through meaningful communicative activities and tasks. Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to comprehend and carry on simple daily conversations and create simple sentences in the past, present, and future tenses. Students will learn how to introduce themselves, describe their surroundings, talk about daily lives, friends and relatives, and talk about past and future events. Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
KORN 012-001 Elementary Korean II M 12:00 PM-01:00 PM
TW 12:00 PM-01:30 PM
This is a continuation of KORN 011. This course aims to further develop the four language skills of students to the novice-high level by building on materials covered in KORN 011. Students will learn how to use three speech styles (polite formal, informal, and intimate) appropriately in a given context. Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to handle simple and elementary needs of daily lives and talk (and write) about a variety of topics such as family, college life, birthday celebration, shopping, Korean food, etc.
KORN 111-001 Intermediate Korean I Siwon Lee T 12:00 PM-01:00 PM
WR 12:00 PM-01:30 PM
This is a continuation of Elementary Korean II. This course is designed to develop students' Korean language proficiency to the intermediate-low level of the ACTFL Proficiency Guidelines. Authentic materials, as well as various student-centered activities that are highly contextualized in everyday interactions will be used. Upon completion of the course, students will be able to present and exchange information on a variety of topics such as weather, fashion, travel, mailing, housing, public transportation, and shopping.
KORN 111-002 Intermediate Korean I Siwon Lee TR 03:30 PM-05:30 PM This is a continuation of Elementary Korean II. This course is designed to develop students' Korean language proficiency to the intermediate-low level of the ACTFL Proficiency Guidelines. Authentic materials, as well as various student-centered activities that are highly contextualized in everyday interactions will be used. Upon completion of the course, students will be able to present and exchange information on a variety of topics such as weather, fashion, travel, mailing, housing, public transportation, and shopping.
KORN 131-001 Korean/Heritge Spkrs I Eunae Kim M 12:00 PM-01:00 PM
TW 12:00 PM-01:30 PM
This course is designed for heritage speakers who have a strong background in everyday Korean. This course focuses on enhancing linguistic accuracy (spelling, grammar, vocabulary, pronunciation) and fluency (idiomatic and figurative expressions, narrative structure, discursive practice) in both spoken and written Korean, as well as gaining a deeper understanding of Korean culture. Upon completion of the course, students will be able to express themselves more accurately and participate in Korea-related communities more meaningfully. This course and its subsequent course KORN 132 complete the College language requirement. Prerequisite: Restricted to students who have previous knowledge in Korean. Students are required to take the Korean placement test.
KORN 211-001 Advanced Korean I Haewon Cho MW 10:15 AM-11:45 AM This course aims to develop functional proficiency in Korean at the intermediate-high level. Students will develop competence in fluency, grammatical accuracy and socio-linguistic/cultural appropriateness through a variety of activities and assignments. In addition, students will learn to communicate using more sophisticated grammatical structures and advanced vocabulary on various topics. The development of each of the four language skills (speaking, listening, reading and writing) is equally emphasized. https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021C&course=KORN211001
KORN 281-680 Business Comm in Korean Haewon Cho MW 03:30 PM-05:00 PM Offered through the Penn Language Center. This course is designed to help students improve their Korean language proficiency by learning essential communication skills necessary to engage in business in Korea. Students will also develop their knowledge of and competence in Korean business culture and practice. The course objectives include: (1) to learn essential business terms, advanced grammar structures and communication strategies in business transactions; (2) to learn Korean business customs and culture, work norms, and business etiquette that students need to successfully communicate in a Korean business context. Topics include job application, business correspondence and reports, discussion and presentation in business meetings, communication styles and strategies in business contexts, current business culture, etc. Prior Language Experience Required https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021C&course=KORN281680
KORN 311-001 Topics Adv Korean Siwon Lee MW 03:30 PM-05:00 PM This course aims to develop an in-depth understanding of Korean culture and society through the analysis of spoken and written Korean discourse. Students will engage with key sociolinguistic concepts of politeness, hierarchy, solidarity, power, age, and gender, and enhance their advanced vocabulary and grammar. Students will also develop their abilities in conversation management, self-presentation, socialization, and sense of socio-cultural appropriateness, and gain a better understanding of how native speakers' cultural practices are reflected in language use and how interpersonal relationships are built and maintained through language.
KORN 331-680 Current Korean Media I Eunae Kim MW 03:30 PM-05:00 PM Offered through the Penn Language Center. This course aims to develop a deeper understanding of the contemporary Korean society through critical analysis of language use and viewpoints expressed in various types of media including the internet, TV, films and newspapers. This course will provide students with a rich opportunity to relate what they have learned in previous Korean language courses to the larger context of Korean culture and society. The course is conducted entirely in Korean and utilizes both written and audiovisual materials to develop students' reading/listening comprehension and critical thinking. The course also involves in-depth class discussion and writing short compositions to enhance conversation and writing skills. Prior Language Experience Required
KORN 481-680 Adv Business Korean I MW 05:15 PM-06:45 PM Offered through the Penn Language Center. This course aims to further develop students' advanced language proficiency and simultaneously deepen their knowledge and understanding of specific areas related to Korean business and economy such as an expansion of business into Asian markets and globalization strategies. Through research, discussion and presentation on various case studies and other business-related materials, students will enhance their critical thinking skills and gain an in-depth perspective on issues related to contemporary Korean business operations and practices. Prior Language Experience Required
KORN 511-001 Adv Academic Korean I CANCELED This course aims to assist students who wish to improve their knowledge of the advanced Korean language skills required to conduct academic research. Students will critically read, analyze, and discuss academic and other relevant texts, written in either Korean or mixed scripts. Readings include, but are not limited to, academic journal articles and book chapters are important in the field of each student's research, as well as major primary sources, such as periodicals, government documents, and other authentic texts from the late nineteenth century to the present. Students will develop familiarity with these texts and a deeper understanding of academic writing styles in Korean. In addition, students will expand their proficiency in Sino-Korean vocabulary and Hanja (Chinese characters), both essential to developing their academic language skills in Korean. This course will be conducted in Korean.