Title Instructors Location Time Description Cross listings Fulfills Registration notes Syllabus Syllabus URL
ALAN 0100-001 Elementary Mongolian I Narantsetseg Tseveendulam MW 5:15 PM-7:14 PM Mongolian is the national language of the independent State of Mongolia and the
ALAN 0300-001 Intermediate Mongolian I Narantsetseg Tseveendulam MW 1:45 PM-3:44 PM Mongolian is the national language of the independent State of Mongolia and the language of the nomadic warriors Genghis Khan (known to the Mongolians themselves as Chinggis Khan). It is also spoken in China and Siberia. Today Mongolian musical styles like throat singing (khoomii), products like cashmere (nooluur), and tourism to visit Mongolia's nomadic herders (malchid) are making a mark on the world stage. In this class the students will continue with the basics of modern Mongolian language, as spoken in Ulaanbaatar "Red Hero," the country's capital. They will learn in the phonetic Cyrillic script, which was adapted to Mongolian language from Russian in 1945, with a few additional letters. Intermediate and more advanced grammar will be taught through communicative methodology. Students will also have opportunity to experience Mongolian arts, culture, and cooking in and out of class. This is the first semester of Intermediate Mongolian. By the end of two semesters intermediate Mongolian, students will have learned all the noun forms, and all the major verb forms and will be able to form complex, multi-clause sentences, telling stories, expressing their feelings, and making arguments and explanations. They should be able to interact in all basic "survival" situations in Mongolia.
CHIN 0100-001 Beginning Chinese I MTWR 8:30 AM-9:29 AM Along with Beginning Modern Chinese II, Beginning Chinese III (Non-Intensive) and Beginning Chinese IV, this is the first course of a four-semester sequence. By completing all four semesters, students fulfill the College language requirement. The sequence starts each fall. Students cannot begin their study in the spring. This course is designed primarily for students who have little or no prior exposure to Chinese. The objective of the course is to help students build a solid foundation of the four basic skills--listening, speaking, reading, and writing in an interactive and communicative learning environment. The emphasis is on correct pronunciation, accurate tones, and mastery of basic grammatical structures, laying the foundation needed to be able to manage social situations such as relating one's personal life and experiences, expressing preferences and feelings, ordering meals, purchasing goods, and asking for directions. In order to achieve these goals, students are expected to thoroughly preview and review the materials according to the weekly lesson plan (on course website) prior to attending class. Regular attendance is mandatory and strictly monitored.
CHIN 0100-002 Beginning Chinese I Xiaomeng Zhang MTWR 10:15 AM-11:14 AM Along with Beginning Modern Chinese II, Beginning Chinese III (Non-Intensive) and Beginning Chinese IV, this is the first course of a four-semester sequence. By completing all four semesters, students fulfill the College language requirement. The sequence starts each fall. Students cannot begin their study in the spring. This course is designed primarily for students who have little or no prior exposure to Chinese. The objective of the course is to help students build a solid foundation of the four basic skills--listening, speaking, reading, and writing in an interactive and communicative learning environment. The emphasis is on correct pronunciation, accurate tones, and mastery of basic grammatical structures, laying the foundation needed to be able to manage social situations such as relating one's personal life and experiences, expressing preferences and feelings, ordering meals, purchasing goods, and asking for directions. In order to achieve these goals, students are expected to thoroughly preview and review the materials according to the weekly lesson plan (on course website) prior to attending class. Regular attendance is mandatory and strictly monitored.
CHIN 0100-003 Beginning Chinese I Xiaomeng Zhang MTWR 12:00 PM-12:59 PM Along with Beginning Modern Chinese II, Beginning Chinese III (Non-Intensive) and Beginning Chinese IV, this is the first course of a four-semester sequence. By completing all four semesters, students fulfill the College language requirement. The sequence starts each fall. Students cannot begin their study in the spring. This course is designed primarily for students who have little or no prior exposure to Chinese. The objective of the course is to help students build a solid foundation of the four basic skills--listening, speaking, reading, and writing in an interactive and communicative learning environment. The emphasis is on correct pronunciation, accurate tones, and mastery of basic grammatical structures, laying the foundation needed to be able to manage social situations such as relating one's personal life and experiences, expressing preferences and feelings, ordering meals, purchasing goods, and asking for directions. In order to achieve these goals, students are expected to thoroughly preview and review the materials according to the weekly lesson plan (on course website) prior to attending class. Regular attendance is mandatory and strictly monitored.
CHIN 0100-004 Beginning Chinese I Maiheng Shen Dietrich MTWR 12:00 PM-12:59 PM Along with Beginning Modern Chinese II, Beginning Chinese III (Non-Intensive) and Beginning Chinese IV, this is the first course of a four-semester sequence. By completing all four semesters, students fulfill the College language requirement. The sequence starts each fall. Students cannot begin their study in the spring. This course is designed primarily for students who have little or no prior exposure to Chinese. The objective of the course is to help students build a solid foundation of the four basic skills--listening, speaking, reading, and writing in an interactive and communicative learning environment. The emphasis is on correct pronunciation, accurate tones, and mastery of basic grammatical structures, laying the foundation needed to be able to manage social situations such as relating one's personal life and experiences, expressing preferences and feelings, ordering meals, purchasing goods, and asking for directions. In order to achieve these goals, students are expected to thoroughly preview and review the materials according to the weekly lesson plan (on course website) prior to attending class. Regular attendance is mandatory and strictly monitored.
CHIN 0100-005 Beginning Chinese I Shihui Fan MTWR 1:45 PM-2:44 PM Along with Beginning Modern Chinese II, Beginning Chinese III (Non-Intensive) and Beginning Chinese IV, this is the first course of a four-semester sequence. By completing all four semesters, students fulfill the College language requirement. The sequence starts each fall. Students cannot begin their study in the spring. This course is designed primarily for students who have little or no prior exposure to Chinese. The objective of the course is to help students build a solid foundation of the four basic skills--listening, speaking, reading, and writing in an interactive and communicative learning environment. The emphasis is on correct pronunciation, accurate tones, and mastery of basic grammatical structures, laying the foundation needed to be able to manage social situations such as relating one's personal life and experiences, expressing preferences and feelings, ordering meals, purchasing goods, and asking for directions. In order to achieve these goals, students are expected to thoroughly preview and review the materials according to the weekly lesson plan (on course website) prior to attending class. Regular attendance is mandatory and strictly monitored.
CHIN 0100-006 Beginning Chinese I Shihui Fan MTWR 3:30 PM-4:29 PM Along with Beginning Modern Chinese II, Beginning Chinese III (Non-Intensive) and Beginning Chinese IV, this is the first course of a four-semester sequence. By completing all four semesters, students fulfill the College language requirement. The sequence starts each fall. Students cannot begin their study in the spring. This course is designed primarily for students who have little or no prior exposure to Chinese. The objective of the course is to help students build a solid foundation of the four basic skills--listening, speaking, reading, and writing in an interactive and communicative learning environment. The emphasis is on correct pronunciation, accurate tones, and mastery of basic grammatical structures, laying the foundation needed to be able to manage social situations such as relating one's personal life and experiences, expressing preferences and feelings, ordering meals, purchasing goods, and asking for directions. In order to achieve these goals, students are expected to thoroughly preview and review the materials according to the weekly lesson plan (on course website) prior to attending class. Regular attendance is mandatory and strictly monitored.
CHIN 0105-680 Spoken Chinese I Maiheng Shen Dietrich MW 3:30 PM-5:29 PM This course is designed for students who have little or no previous exposure to Chinese. The main objective of the course is to help students develop their listening and speaking skills. The emphasis is on correct pronunciation, accurate tones and mastery of basic grammatical structures. Chinese characters will not be taught.
CHIN 0131-680 Beginning Cantonese I Yan Huang TR 5:15 PM-6:59 PM Beginning Cantonese is a preliminary course for spoken Cantonese. The course provides fundamental aspects of the dialect as experienced in daily life situations and lays the foundation which will enable students to communicate in Cantonese for daily life needs, such as making phone calls, making purchases, getting around by various means of transportation, seeing a doctor, being a guest or a host at dinner, talking about the weather, talking about sports and entertainment, etc. It is strongly recommended that students continue to Beginning Cantonese II to become conversational
CHIN 0133-680 Beginning Taiwanese I Grace Mei-Hui Wu TR 3:30 PM-4:59 PM Beginning Taiwanese I is designed to help students learn enough to enable them to handle basic social interactions when visiting Taiwan, such as greeting others, introducing yourself, ordering food, asking directions, etc. You will also learn to listen and understand the oral language typically heard in locations such as the grocery store, train station, bus stop, and restaurants.
CHIN 0160-680 Beginning Business Chinese I Xiaomeng Zhang TR 3:30 PM-5:29 PM The course is designed for juniors and seniors , and Penn working professionals who have no prior exposure to Chinese, and are interested in learning basic Chinese language and culture for the preparation of a business trip to China. The objective of this course is to build a foundation of basic Chinese in the business context, with a main focus on speaking and listening, and minimal reading. Upon completion, students are expected to be able to converse and interact with people in a variety of traveling settings and in company visits. Topics include meeting people, talking about family, introducing companies, making inquiries and appointments, visiting companies, introducing products, initiating dining invitations, and practicing dining etiquette.
CHIN 0210-001 Intensive Beginning Chinese I & II MTWRF 10:15 AM-11:44 AM Along with Intensive Beginning Chinese III & IV, this is the first course of a two-semester sequence. By completing both semesters, students fulfill the College language requirement. The sequence starts each fall. Students cannot begin their study in the spring. This course covers the same material as Beginning Chinese I & II. The main objective is to help students build a solid foundation of the four basic skills--listening, speaking, reading, and writing. By the end of this course, students should achieve a solid foundation in: 1) pronouncing all the sounds in Mandarin Chinese accurately and comfortably with a good command of the 4 tones; 2) carry out basic conversations in daily activities; 3) recognize and reproduce approximately 600-650 characters; and 4) read edited simple stories and write short notes or letters. Grammatical and cultural issues are discussed during lecture hours. Oral communication tasks are given every week.
CHIN 0300-001 Intermediate Chinese I Xiaomeng Zhang MTWR 8:30 AM-9:29 AM This is the third course in a four-semester sequence. By completing all four semesters, students fulfill the College language requirement. The objective of the course is to continue building a solid foundation of the four basic skills--listening, speaking, reading and writing. By the end of this course, students should achieve the following goals: 1) pronounce all the sounds in Mandarin accurately and comfortably with a good command of the four tones; 2) carry out simple dialogues of familiar topics; 3) recognize and reproduce approximately 450-500 characters; and 4) read short textbook stories and write simple notes. In order to develop students' listening and speaking ability, oral communication tasks are given on each lesson.
CHIN 0300-002 Intermediate Chinese I Shihui Fan MTWR 10:15 AM-11:14 AM This is the third course in a four-semester sequence. By completing all four semesters, students fulfill the College language requirement. The objective of the course is to continue building a solid foundation of the four basic skills--listening, speaking, reading and writing. By the end of this course, students should achieve the following goals: 1) pronounce all the sounds in Mandarin accurately and comfortably with a good command of the four tones; 2) carry out simple dialogues of familiar topics; 3) recognize and reproduce approximately 450-500 characters; and 4) read short textbook stories and write simple notes. In order to develop students' listening and speaking ability, oral communication tasks are given on each lesson.
CHIN 0300-003 Intermediate Chinese I MTWR 12:00 PM-12:59 PM This is the third course in a four-semester sequence. By completing all four semesters, students fulfill the College language requirement. The objective of the course is to continue building a solid foundation of the four basic skills--listening, speaking, reading and writing. By the end of this course, students should achieve the following goals: 1) pronounce all the sounds in Mandarin accurately and comfortably with a good command of the four tones; 2) carry out simple dialogues of familiar topics; 3) recognize and reproduce approximately 450-500 characters; and 4) read short textbook stories and write simple notes. In order to develop students' listening and speaking ability, oral communication tasks are given on each lesson.
CHIN 0300-004 Intermediate Chinese I MTWR 1:45 PM-2:44 PM This is the third course in a four-semester sequence. By completing all four semesters, students fulfill the College language requirement. The objective of the course is to continue building a solid foundation of the four basic skills--listening, speaking, reading and writing. By the end of this course, students should achieve the following goals: 1) pronounce all the sounds in Mandarin accurately and comfortably with a good command of the four tones; 2) carry out simple dialogues of familiar topics; 3) recognize and reproduce approximately 450-500 characters; and 4) read short textbook stories and write simple notes. In order to develop students' listening and speaking ability, oral communication tasks are given on each lesson.
CHIN 0300-005 Intermediate Chinese I MTWR 1:45 PM-2:44 PM This is the third course in a four-semester sequence. By completing all four semesters, students fulfill the College language requirement. The objective of the course is to continue building a solid foundation of the four basic skills--listening, speaking, reading and writing. By the end of this course, students should achieve the following goals: 1) pronounce all the sounds in Mandarin accurately and comfortably with a good command of the four tones; 2) carry out simple dialogues of familiar topics; 3) recognize and reproduce approximately 450-500 characters; and 4) read short textbook stories and write simple notes. In order to develop students' listening and speaking ability, oral communication tasks are given on each lesson.
CHIN 0300-006 Intermediate Chinese I MTWR 3:30 PM-4:29 PM This is the third course in a four-semester sequence. By completing all four semesters, students fulfill the College language requirement. The objective of the course is to continue building a solid foundation of the four basic skills--listening, speaking, reading and writing. By the end of this course, students should achieve the following goals: 1) pronounce all the sounds in Mandarin accurately and comfortably with a good command of the four tones; 2) carry out simple dialogues of familiar topics; 3) recognize and reproduce approximately 450-500 characters; and 4) read short textbook stories and write simple notes. In order to develop students' listening and speaking ability, oral communication tasks are given on each lesson.
CHIN 0301-001 Intermediate Chinese I Shihui Fan MTWR 12:00 PM-12:59 PM This is the third course in a four-semester sequence. By completing all four semesters, students fulfill the College language requirement. The objective of the course is to continue building a solid foundation of the four basic skills--listening, speaking, reading and writing. By the end of this course, students should achieve the following goals: 1) pronounce all the sounds in Mandarin accurately and comfortably with a good command of the four tones; 2) carry out simple dialogues of familiar topics; 3) recognize and reproduce approximately 450-500 characters; and 4) read short textbook stories and write simple notes. In order to develop students' listening and speaking ability, oral communication tasks are given on each lesson. Perm Needed From Instructor
CHIN 0305-680 Spoken Chinese III Chih-Jen Lee MW 3:30 PM-4:59 PM This course is designed for students who have completed one year of college level Chinese classes or equivalent. The main objective of the course is to improve students' conversational ability in Chinese in order to accomplish day-to-day tasks. These tasks include relating one's personal life and experiences, expressing preference, feeling and opinion, ordering a meal, purchasing goods, asking for directions, making travel plans, visiting a doctor, attending a social functions etc. Short Chinese movies or television shows will be integrated into the course curriculum. Chinese characters will not be taught.
CHIN 0320-001 Reading and Writing in Chinese I (for Fluent Speakers) Jing Hu MTWR 10:15 AM-11:14 AM The course is designed for students who can speak Chinese but cannot read and write in Chinese characters. The major purpose of this course is to help students develop the ability to use written Mandarin Chinese in linguistically and socially appropriate ways. The literacy goal is to master 350 to 1000 Chinese characters and to reach an intermediate-low level of ACTFL literacy proficiency. The key teaching approach is to holistically read a prodigious amount of materials. Students' reading abilities will be developed through reading short stories under instructions, and eventually through reading long stories and news independently.
CHIN 0320-002 Reading and Writing in Chinese I (for Fluent Speakers) Grace Mei-Hui Wu MTWR 12:00 PM-12:59 PM The course is designed for students who can speak Chinese but cannot read and write in Chinese characters. The major purpose of this course is to help students develop the ability to use written Mandarin Chinese in linguistically and socially appropriate ways. The literacy goal is to master 350 to 1000 Chinese characters and to reach an intermediate-low level of ACTFL literacy proficiency. The key teaching approach is to holistically read a prodigious amount of materials. Students' reading abilities will be developed through reading short stories under instructions, and eventually through reading long stories and news independently.
CHIN 0320-003 Reading and Writing in Chinese I (for Fluent Speakers) Jing Hu CANCELED The course is designed for students who can speak Chinese but cannot read and write in Chinese characters. The major purpose of this course is to help students develop the ability to use written Mandarin Chinese in linguistically and socially appropriate ways. The literacy goal is to master 350 to 1000 Chinese characters and to reach an intermediate-low level of ACTFL literacy proficiency. The key teaching approach is to holistically read a prodigious amount of materials. Students' reading abilities will be developed through reading short stories under instructions, and eventually through reading long stories and news independently.
CHIN 0320-004 Reading and Writing in Chinese I (for Fluent Speakers) Grace Mei-Hui Wu MTWR 1:45 PM-2:44 PM The course is designed for students who can speak Chinese but cannot read and write in Chinese characters. The major purpose of this course is to help students develop the ability to use written Mandarin Chinese in linguistically and socially appropriate ways. The literacy goal is to master 350 to 1000 Chinese characters and to reach an intermediate-low level of ACTFL literacy proficiency. The key teaching approach is to holistically read a prodigious amount of materials. Students' reading abilities will be developed through reading short stories under instructions, and eventually through reading long stories and news independently.
CHIN 0331-680 Intermediate Cantonese I Yan Huang TR 7:00 PM-8:29 PM Intermediate Cantonese is a course for students who are able to communicate in the dialect in basic survival situations. Through this course, the students will acquire a better understanding of Cantonese and its related culture, and can confidently cope with a wide range of situations. Classes will be conducted through Cantonese textbooks, discussions of various topics, and composition and presentation of students' own dialogues so that in time they may express more complex ideas and feelings. Continuation to Intermediate Cantonese II is strongly encouraged.
CHIN 0333-680 Intermediate Taiwanese I Grace Mei-Hui Wu TR 5:15 PM-6:44 PM Students will further develop their speaking and listening skills and will be able to communicate with ease and confidence when dealing with everyday routine tasks. Students will also gain skills to process and seek information in Taiwanese. Conversation topics include New Year, folk songs, and Tang poetry. Authentic materials are used for enhancing reading, listening, and speaking practices.
CHIN 0500-001 HIgh Intermediate Chinese I Ye Tian MTWR 10:15 AM-11:14 AM This course aims to develop students' overall linguistic skills in listening, speaking, reading, and writing Chinese. The specially designed textbook gives introduction to various topics on Chinese culture. Students can expect to gain knowledge about China while they are learning the language. By completion of the course, students are expected to be able to master 1200 most frequently used characters in common reading materials, and to communicate in Chinese .
CHIN 0500-002 HIgh Intermediate Chinese I Ye Tian MTWR 12:00 PM-12:59 PM This course aims to develop students' overall linguistic skills in listening, speaking, reading, and writing Chinese. The specially designed textbook gives introduction to various topics on Chinese culture. Students can expect to gain knowledge about China while they are learning the language. By completion of the course, students are expected to be able to master 1200 most frequently used characters in common reading materials, and to communicate in Chinese .
CHIN 0500-003 HIgh Intermediate Chinese I Jing Hu MTWR 1:45 PM-2:44 PM This course aims to develop students' overall linguistic skills in listening, speaking, reading, and writing Chinese. The specially designed textbook gives introduction to various topics on Chinese culture. Students can expect to gain knowledge about China while they are learning the language. By completion of the course, students are expected to be able to master 1200 most frequently used characters in common reading materials, and to communicate in Chinese .
CHIN 0520-001 Reading and Writing Chinese III (for Fluent Speakers) Grace Mei-Hui Wu MW 10:15 AM-11:44 AM An intermediate reading and writing course designed for students at the ACTFL intermediate-mid reading and writing proficiency. The goal of this course is to reach the intermediate-high level of proficiency. This course concentrates on writing of muti-paragraph essays through the use of conventional rhetorical modes and standard grammatical structures. Students will be given ample time to think and to discuss (the crucial "brainstorming" phase) before writing. The course stresses content, culture and comparison and draws its content from assigned readings and evidence-based argument from texts and other stimuli such as Internet, newspapers and films.
CHIN 0700-001 Advanced Chinese I Jiajia Wang MTWR 1:45 PM-2:44 PM Students learn to work on materials which were written or produced for native speakers, instead of the classroom materials that were written for the non-native speakers. The reading materials include a larger vocabulary with more idioms. Students will also learn how to understand and use certain oral expressions in conversation. They will learn ways to narrate, to describe, and to comment in native Chinese ways. Reading and audio materials are provided and discussed in the classes. Writing and oral presentations in Chinese are required in classroom under instruction. Students will be encouraged to practice oral communication with each other.
CHIN 0701-001 Advanced Chinese I Jiajia Wang MTWR 12:00 PM-12:59 PM Students learn to work on materials which were written or produced for native speakers, instead of the classroom materials that were written for the non-native speakers. The reading materials include a larger vocabulary with more idioms. Students will also learn how to understand and use certain oral expressions in conversation. They will learn ways to narrate, to describe, and to comment in native Chinese ways. Reading and audio materials are provided and discussed in the classes. Writing and oral presentations in Chinese are required in classroom under instruction. Students will be encouraged to practice oral communication with each other. Perm Needed From Instructor
CHIN 0705-680 Advanced Spoken Chinese I Ye Tian MW 3:30 PM-4:59 PM This course is designed for students who have completed at least the intermediate level Chinese language course, or have studied the language for at least three years. The objective of this course is to consolidate the knowledge and skills students have acquired from their previous Mandarin Chinese classes and to enhance their oral expressive skills. By the end of the semester, students are expected to be able to carry on a conversation with a native Mandarin speaker on various common topics, including the current issues in China on education, society, politics, culture and history. Students will also learn how to gather information necessary for conducting oral presentations and speeches.
CHIN 0860-001 Business Chinese I Mien-Hwa Chiang MW 10:15 AM-11:44 AM This aim of this course is to enhance students' language skills in a business context and to promote their understanding about business environment and culture in contemporary China. The text is developed from real business cases from real multinational companies that have successfully dealt on the Chinese market. Classes include lectures, drills on vocabulary and sentence patterns, and discussions. Class will be conducted in Chinese. In addition to the course textbook, students will learn to read business news in Chinese selected from the Wall Street Journal.
CHIN 0860-002 Business Chinese I Jiajia Wang MW 3:30 PM-4:59 PM This aim of this course is to enhance students' language skills in a business context and to promote their understanding about business environment and culture in contemporary China. The text is developed from real business cases from real multinational companies that have successfully dealt on the Chinese market. Classes include lectures, drills on vocabulary and sentence patterns, and discussions. Class will be conducted in Chinese. In addition to the course textbook, students will learn to read business news in Chinese selected from the Wall Street Journal.
CHIN 0860-680 Business Chinese I Jiajia Wang TR 3:30 PM-4:59 PM This aim of this course is to enhance students' language skills in a business context and to promote their understanding about business environment and culture in contemporary China. The text is developed from real business cases from real multinational companies that have successfully dealt on the Chinese market. Classes include lectures, drills on vocabulary and sentence patterns, and discussions. Class will be conducted in Chinese. In addition to the course textbook, students will learn to read business news in Chinese selected from the Wall Street Journal.
CHIN 0870-001 Media Chinese Mien-Hwa Chiang MW 1:45 PM-3:14 PM This course aims to help students improve their language skills and enlarge their vocabulary through reading online news on Chinese internet. Students will learn formal vocabulary and enhance their grammatical accuracy. Students are encouraged to explore Chinese government and company websites and Baidu Baike, in order to learn how to conduct their own online searches for both professional and academic purposes. Linguistic features in news headlines, accuracy of online translation tools, media censorship, social media usage will also be discussed in this class. The course goal is to help students gain Chinese media literacy by reading, browsing and viewing online materials.
CHIN 0878-680 Advanced Medical Chinese Chih-Jen Lee TR 3:30 PM-4:59 PM Advanced Medical Chinese is a content-based course with curriculum adapted from the online course of New York University School of Medicine (NYUsom). It offers Mandarin training to medical/nursing students and other health professionals who may need to visit China or to serve limited English proficient Chinese-speaking patients. For physician/nurse-patients communication purposes, it is designed for students who have studied Chinese for three years or more in a regular college program or with the equivalent language proficiency and have studied medicine.
CHIN 1040-001 Readings in Modern Chinese: Literature I Maiheng Shen Dietrich TR 1:45 PM-3:14 PM This course is designed for students who have completed three years of college level Mandarin classes or equivalent. This course may be used to fulfill the language or elective requirement for the EALC or EAST major or minor in the Chinese concentration. The objectives of the course are 1) to help students gain an in-depth, multi-faceted and critical understanding of the Chinese people, Chinese society and Chinese culture; 2) to facilitate students 'acquisition of formal or written language; and 3) to develop students' analytical and critical thinking skills. These objectives are achieved primarily through 1) close reading and discussion of original literary texts by 20th -century Chinese writers; and 2) regular writing exercises. Students will also view several Chinese films that are related to the topics of the reading text. The class is to be conducted exclusively in Chinese.
CHIN 1060-001 Advanced Business Chinese I Mien-Hwa Chiang TR 10:15 AM-11:44 AM This content-based course provides students with the conceptual framework to understand issues China has been facing since its economic reform in 1978. Topics include WTO principles, the change of China's state-owned enterprises, China's economy in Mao's period, and the pros and cons of globalization. Students will be trained in reading financial articles, discussing international trades, conducting online research and giving business presentations. After the course, students will become more sophisticated in their understanding of China's economic development and in using Chinese business terminology in professional settings. The course assumes basic background in business and advanced level proficiency in Chinese language. The course is NOT open to first-year students with no undergraduate business course.
CHIN 1060-680 Advanced Business Chinese I Mien-Hwa Chiang MW 3:30 PM-4:59 PM This content-based course provides students with the conceptual framework to understand issues China has been facing since its economic reform in 1978. Topics include WTO principles, the change of China's state-owned enterprises, China's economy in Mao's period, and the pros and cons of globalization. Students will be trained in reading financial articles, discussing international trades, conducting online research and giving business presentations. After the course, students will become more sophisticated in their understanding of China's economic development and in using Chinese business terminology in professional settings. The course assumes basic background in business and advanced level proficiency in Chinese language. The course is NOT open to first-year students with no undergraduate business course.
CHIN 8600-680 Chinese Language Pedagogy and Methods Ye Tian TR 1:45 PM-3:14 PM This graduate course is designed to equip students with the most advanced and up-to-date theoretical knowledge and practical skills of teaching modern Chinese with emphasis on the instruction of beginning and intermediate levels. The theoretical component introduces you to both mainstream and innovative theoretical frameworks in second-language acquisition and sociology of education, including teaching within the National Standards; communication-based audio-lingo approach; backward design; prosodic syntax in Chinese; official knowledge; tracking; ecologies of resources; assessment and testing. The practical component emphasizes everyday classroom situations and discusses diverse teaching concepts and the development of individual teaching strategies and styles. Special attention will be given to concrete teaching and learning strategies within the communication-based audio-lingo approach, including Chinese grammar illustration, corrective feedback, teaching techniques, educational technologies, etc.
Chinese proficiency at the advanced level is required because this course will be taught in both Chinese and English, and many of the reading materials are in Chinese.
EALC8600680
EALC 0020-001 Introduction to Chinese Civilization Hsiao-Wen Cheng MW 1:45 PM-2:44 PM Survey of the civilization of China from prehistoric times to the present. History & Tradition Sector
Cross Cultural Analysis
EALC 0020-201 Introduction to Chinese Civilization F 10:15 AM-11:14 AM Survey of the civilization of China from prehistoric times to the present. Cross Cultural Analysis
History & Tradition Sector
EALC 0020-202 Introduction to Chinese Civilization F 10:15 AM-11:14 AM Survey of the civilization of China from prehistoric times to the present. Cross Cultural Analysis
History & Tradition Sector
EALC 0020-203 Introduction to Chinese Civilization F 12:00 PM-12:59 PM Survey of the civilization of China from prehistoric times to the present. Cross Cultural Analysis
History & Tradition Sector
EALC 0020-204 Introduction to Chinese Civilization F 1:45 PM-2:44 PM Survey of the civilization of China from prehistoric times to the present. History & Tradition Sector
Cross Cultural Analysis
EALC 0160-401 Arts of Korea Frank L Chance MW 1:45 PM-3:14 PM The goal of this course is understanding the development of visual, performing, and literary arts in Korea and the historical, religious, and social contexts in which they flourished. It serves as an introduction to the arts of Korea, with emphasis on painting, sculpture, ceramics, and architecture and additional consideration of dance, drama, poetry, and culinary arts. Covers the whole history of Korea, from prehistoric times to the twenty-first century. EALC5160401 Cross Cultural Analysis
EALC 0500-401 East Asian Religions Ori Tavor TR 12:00 PM-1:29 PM This course will introduce students to the diverse beliefs, ideas, and practices of East Asia's major religious traditions: Buddhism, Confucianism, Daoism, Shinto, Popular Religion, as well as Asian forms of Islam and Christianity. As religious identity in East Asia is often fluid and non-sectarian in nature, there religious traditions will not be investigated in isolation. Instead, the course will adopt a chronological and geographical approach, examining the spread of religious ideas and practices across East Asia and the ensuing results of these encounters. The course will be divided into three units. Unit one will cover the religions of China. We will begin by discussing early Chinese religion and its role in shaping the imperial state before turning to the arrival of Buddhism and its impact in the development of organized Daoism, as well as local religion. In the second unit, we will turn eastward into Korea and Japan. After examining the impact of Confucianism and Buddhism on the religious histories of these two regions, we will proceed to learn about the formation of new schools of Buddhism, as well as the rituals and beliefs associated with Japanese Shinto and Korean Shamanism. The third and final unit will focus on the modern and contemporary periods through an analysis of key themes such as religion and modernity, the global reception and interpretation of East Asian religions, andthe relationship between religion and popular culture. The class will be conducted mainly in the form of a lecture, but some sessions will be partially devoted to a discussion of primary sources in translation. The course assignments are designed to evaluate the development of both of these areas. No previous knowledge of East Asian languages is necessary, and all readings will be available in English on the Canvas site in PDF form. RELS0500401 Cross Cultural Analysis
EALC 1129-401 Chinese Architecture Nancy R S Steinhardt TR 12:00 PM-1:29 PM Survey of Chinese buildings and building technology from the formative period in the second millennium BCE through the twentieth century. The course will deal with well-known monuments such as the Buddhist monasteries of Wutai, imperial palaces in Chang'an and Beijing, the Ming tombs and the Temple of Heaven, and less frequently studied buildings. Also covered will be the theory and principles of Chinese construction. EALC5129401 Cross Cultural Analysis
EALC 1321-401 18th-Century Seminar: China in the English Imagination Chi-Ming Yang CANCELED This course explores the material culture of china-mania that spread across England and Europe in the eighteenth century, from chinoiserie vogues in fashion, tea, porcelain, and luxury goods, to the idealization of Confucius by Enlightenment philosophers. How was Asia was imagined and understood by Europeans during a period of increased trade between East and West? The course texts include travel writing, poetry, essays, and plays. Students will work closely with rare books and with art objects at the Penn Museum and the Philadelphia Museum of Art. The course is designed to provide historical background to contemporary problems of Orientalism, Sinophilia, and Sinophobia. ASAM2310401, COML2031401, ENGL2031401 Cross Cultural Analysis
EALC 1331-401 Chinese and Sinophone Cinemas Chenshu Zhou T 12:00 PM-2:59 PM This course is a survey of Chinese and Sinophone cinemas from the silent era to the present. The Sinophone refers to Sinitic film cultures both inside and outside the People’s Republic of China that have been in relatively marginalized positions against the Han-Chinese mainstream, such as Taiwanese, Hong Kong, Tibetan, and transpacific cinemas. One major goal of the course is to interrogate the national cinema framework and to show how the meaning of “Chineseness” has been problematized by filmmakers and critics throughout modern history. Students will learn about important film movements and trends such as leftist cinema from the 1930s, socialist cinema, Taiwanese and Hong Kong New Waves, the Fifth and Sixth Generation filmmakers, and contemporary transnational productions. Attention will be paid to both films known for awards and artistic achievements and popular genres including thrillers, horror, and wuxia (martial art). ARTH3940401, CIMS3940401
EALC 1339-001 Chinese Popular Culture M 1:45 PM-4:44 PM This course provides a rigorous training of cultural analysis to help students familiarize with the field of cultural studies. It examines some of the theoretical and methodological issues related to social analysis such as postcolonialism, postmodernism, transnationalism, and critical theories that had a huge impact on the development of humanities studies over past few decades. The course re-quirement includes three position papers, two exams, pop quiz, and possible additional assign-ments. Cross Cultural Analysis
EALC 1379-001 Korean Popular Culture So Rim Lee W 1:45 PM-4:44 PM "Korean Wave" (Hallyu) is currently raging throughout non-Western parts of the world, especially Asia, and may be making its way to the West. From South Korean tele-dramas and K-pop music to their respective celebrity icons, these popular cultural forms from Korea are increasingly becoming part of the everyday landscape and vocabulary. We will attempt to understand and evaluate this cultural phenomenon-its promises and limitations as well as its popularity and backlash against it. More specifically, this course explores the ways in which television, music, manhwa (comic books), and the internet participate in the transnational production and circulation of culture, modernity, tradition, ideology, and politics. Some of the more specific topics covered may include: Korean emotions and melodramas; imitation versus innovation in K-pop; fictions of history in period dramas; the marketing of new masculinity; revival of folk culture; preservation of traditional values in postmodern times; repatriation of Korean American pop stars to Korea; and youth culture. Requires outside viewing and listening. Cross Cultural Analysis
EALC 1550-401 The Religion of Anime Jolyon Thomas M 5:15 PM-6:14 PM
W 5:15 PM-8:14 PM
Be it shrine maidens, gods of death, and bodhisattvas fighting for justice; apocalypse, the afterlife, and apotheosis... the popular Japanese illustrated media of manga and anime are replete with religious characters and religious ideas. This course uses popular illustrated media as a tool for tracing the long history of how media and religion have been deeply intertwined in Japan. CIMS0790401, RELS0790401 Cross Cultural Analysis
Arts & Letters Sector
EALC 1550-402 The Religion of Anime Jolyon Thomas F 10:15 AM-11:14 AM Be it shrine maidens, gods of death, and bodhisattvas fighting for justice; apocalypse, the afterlife, and apotheosis... the popular Japanese illustrated media of manga and anime are replete with religious characters and religious ideas. This course uses popular illustrated media as a tool for tracing the long history of how media and religion have been deeply intertwined in Japan. CIMS0790402, RELS0790402 Arts & Letters Sector
Cross Cultural Analysis
EALC 1550-403 The Religion of Anime Jolyon Thomas F 10:15 AM-11:14 AM Be it shrine maidens, gods of death, and bodhisattvas fighting for justice; apocalypse, the afterlife, and apotheosis... the popular Japanese illustrated media of manga and anime are replete with religious characters and religious ideas. This course uses popular illustrated media as a tool for tracing the long history of how media and religion have been deeply intertwined in Japan. CIMS0790403, RELS0790403 Arts & Letters Sector
Cross Cultural Analysis
EALC 1550-404 The Religion of Anime Jolyon Thomas F 12:00 PM-12:59 PM Be it shrine maidens, gods of death, and bodhisattvas fighting for justice; apocalypse, the afterlife, and apotheosis... the popular Japanese illustrated media of manga and anime are replete with religious characters and religious ideas. This course uses popular illustrated media as a tool for tracing the long history of how media and religion have been deeply intertwined in Japan. CIMS0790404, RELS0790404 Cross Cultural Analysis
Arts & Letters Sector
EALC 1550-405 The Religion of Anime Jolyon Thomas F 12:00 PM-12:59 PM Be it shrine maidens, gods of death, and bodhisattvas fighting for justice; apocalypse, the afterlife, and apotheosis... the popular Japanese illustrated media of manga and anime are replete with religious characters and religious ideas. This course uses popular illustrated media as a tool for tracing the long history of how media and religion have been deeply intertwined in Japan. CIMS0790405, RELS0790405 Cross Cultural Analysis
Arts & Letters Sector
EALC 1711-401 East Asian Diplomacy Frederick R Dickinson MW 12:00 PM-12:59 PM Home to four of the five most populous states and four of the five largest economies, the Asia/Pacific is arguably the most dynamic region in the twenty-first century. At the same time, Cold War remnants (a divided Korea and China) and major geopolitical shifts (the rise of China and India, decline of the US and Japan) contribute significantly to the volatility of our world. This course will examine the political, economic, and geopolitical dynamism of the region through a survey of relations among the great powers in Asia from the sixteenth century to the present. Special emphasis will be given to regional and global developments from the perspective of the three principal East Asian states--China, Japan and Korea. We will explore the many informal, as well as formal, means of intercourse that have made East Asia what it is today. Graduate students should consult graduate syllabus for graduate reading list, special recitation time and graduate requirements. EALC5711401, HIST1550401, HIST5550401
EALC 1711-402 East Asian Diplomacy F 12:00 PM-12:59 PM Home to four of the five most populous states and four of the five largest economies, the Asia/Pacific is arguably the most dynamic region in the twenty-first century. At the same time, Cold War remnants (a divided Korea and China) and major geopolitical shifts (the rise of China and India, decline of the US and Japan) contribute significantly to the volatility of our world. This course will examine the political, economic, and geopolitical dynamism of the region through a survey of relations among the great powers in Asia from the sixteenth century to the present. Special emphasis will be given to regional and global developments from the perspective of the three principal East Asian states--China, Japan and Korea. We will explore the many informal, as well as formal, means of intercourse that have made East Asia what it is today. Graduate students should consult graduate syllabus for graduate reading list, special recitation time and graduate requirements. HIST1550402
EALC 1711-403 East Asian Diplomacy F 1:45 PM-2:44 PM Home to four of the five most populous states and four of the five largest economies, the Asia/Pacific is arguably the most dynamic region in the twenty-first century. At the same time, Cold War remnants (a divided Korea and China) and major geopolitical shifts (the rise of China and India, decline of the US and Japan) contribute significantly to the volatility of our world. This course will examine the political, economic, and geopolitical dynamism of the region through a survey of relations among the great powers in Asia from the sixteenth century to the present. Special emphasis will be given to regional and global developments from the perspective of the three principal East Asian states--China, Japan and Korea. We will explore the many informal, as well as formal, means of intercourse that have made East Asia what it is today. Graduate students should consult graduate syllabus for graduate reading list, special recitation time and graduate requirements. HIST1550403
EALC 1711-404 East Asian Diplomacy F 12:00 PM-12:59 PM Home to four of the five most populous states and four of the five largest economies, the Asia/Pacific is arguably the most dynamic region in the twenty-first century. At the same time, Cold War remnants (a divided Korea and China) and major geopolitical shifts (the rise of China and India, decline of the US and Japan) contribute significantly to the volatility of our world. This course will examine the political, economic, and geopolitical dynamism of the region through a survey of relations among the great powers in Asia from the sixteenth century to the present. Special emphasis will be given to regional and global developments from the perspective of the three principal East Asian states--China, Japan and Korea. We will explore the many informal, as well as formal, means of intercourse that have made East Asia what it is today. Graduate students should consult graduate syllabus for graduate reading list, special recitation time and graduate requirements. HIST1550404
EALC 1711-405 East Asian Diplomacy F 1:45 PM-2:44 PM Home to four of the five most populous states and four of the five largest economies, the Asia/Pacific is arguably the most dynamic region in the twenty-first century. At the same time, Cold War remnants (a divided Korea and China) and major geopolitical shifts (the rise of China and India, decline of the US and Japan) contribute significantly to the volatility of our world. This course will examine the political, economic, and geopolitical dynamism of the region through a survey of relations among the great powers in Asia from the sixteenth century to the present. Special emphasis will be given to regional and global developments from the perspective of the three principal East Asian states--China, Japan and Korea. We will explore the many informal, as well as formal, means of intercourse that have made East Asia what it is today. Graduate students should consult graduate syllabus for graduate reading list, special recitation time and graduate requirements. HIST1550405
EALC 1711-406 East Asian Diplomacy R 5:15 PM-6:14 PM Home to four of the five most populous states and four of the five largest economies, the Asia/Pacific is arguably the most dynamic region in the twenty-first century. At the same time, Cold War remnants (a divided Korea and China) and major geopolitical shifts (the rise of China and India, decline of the US and Japan) contribute significantly to the volatility of our world. This course will examine the political, economic, and geopolitical dynamism of the region through a survey of relations among the great powers in Asia from the sixteenth century to the present. Special emphasis will be given to regional and global developments from the perspective of the three principal East Asian states--China, Japan and Korea. We will explore the many informal, as well as formal, means of intercourse that have made East Asia what it is today. Graduate students should consult graduate syllabus for graduate reading list, special recitation time and graduate requirements. HIST1550406
EALC 1731-401 20th Century China: Democracy, Constitutions, and States Arthur Waldron TR 10:15 AM-11:44 AM Since 1900 four types of states have ruled China: dynastic, elective parliamentary, authoritarian nationalist, and communist. We will trace each from its intellectual origins to conclusion. By doing so we will present a solid and wide-ranging narrative of China's past century, introducing newly discovered material, some controversial. Above all we will dig into the issues raised by the century's mixture of regimes. Right now China is a dictatorship but once it was an imperfect democracy. Does this prove that Chinese are somehow incapable of creating democracy? That sadly it is just not in their DNA? Or only that the task is very difficult in a country nearly forty times the size of England and developing rapidly? That without dictatorship the Chinese almost inevitably collapse into chaos? Or only that blood and iron have been used regularly with harsh effectiveness? You will be given a solid grounding in events, and also in how they are interpreted, right up to the present. Readings will be mostly by Chinese authors (translated), everything from primary sources to narrative to fiction. We will also use wartime documentary films. Two lectures per week, regular mid-term and final exams, and a paper on a topic of your own choice. No prerequisites. HIST1593401
EALC 2121-401 Chinese Wall Painting Nancy R S Steinhardt T 1:45 PM-4:44 PM This courses examines murals in Chinese temples and tombs from their earliest appearance in the first millennium BCE through the 20th century. Some are in situ; others are in museums. Murals are studied alongside paintings on silk and paper. Chinese wall painting is also studied alongside murals in temples and tombs in Korea, Japan, and Mongolia. EALC6121401
EALC 2221-401 Chinese Poetry & Prose: In translation Victor H Mair TR 8:30 AM-9:59 AM A wide variety of poetic & prose genres from the earliest times to the 19th century is introduced through English translation. A few selections will also be studied in Chinese characters with romanized transcriptions. There are no prerequisites for this course. EALC6221401 Cross Cultural Analysis
EALC 2763-001 Readings in Korean History TR 1:45 PM-3:14 PM This course introduces students to English-language scholarship on social history of Korea from the founding of the Chosŏn dynasty (1392–1910) to the mid-nineteenth century. Conducted as a reading seminar, the course will examine status and gender in early modern Korean society by considering, among others, descent, kinship, marriage, education, and economy. A reading list of noteworthy studies is intended to help the students map some critical questions and debates that have shaped the historiography. Everyone must participate actively in discussions, provide oral presentations as a discussion leader, and submit two review essays. No knowledge of Korean language or culture is presumed. This course satisfies Cross Cultural Analysis requirement. Cross Cultural Analysis
EALC 3246-401 The Tale of Genji Linda H Chance TR 3:30 PM-4:59 PM "Crowning masterpiece of Japanese literature," "the world's first novel," "fountainhead of Japanese literary and aesthetic culture," "a great soap opera in the vein of Jacqueline Susann." Readers over the centuries have praised the Tale of Genji, the monumental prose tale finished just after the year 1000, in a variety of ways. In this course we will read the latest English translation of Murasaki Shikibu's work. We will watch as Genji loses his mother at a tender age, is cast out of the royal family, and begins a quest to fill the void she left. Along the way, Genji's loyalty to all the women he encounters forges his reputation as the ideal lover. We will consider gender issues in the female author's portrayal of this rake, and question the changing audience, from bored court women to censorious monks, from adoring nationalists to comic book adaptors. Study of the tale requires consideration of poetry, imagery, costume, music, history, religion, theater, political and material culture, all of which will be components of the course. We will also trace the effect of the tale's many motifs, from flora and fauna to murderously jealous spirits, on later literature and conceptions of human emotions. All material is in English translation. There are no prerequisites. EALC7246401, GSWS3246401 Cross Cultural Analysis https://coursesintouch.apps.upenn.edu/cpr/jsp/fast.do?webService=syll&t=202230&c=EALC3246401
EALC 3252-001 Japanese Ghost Stories Kathryn Hemmann MW 3:30 PM-4:59 PM This course offers a survey of the numinous and supernatural through Japanese fiction, films, drama, comics, and video games from ancient times to the present day. Students will assemble a foundational knowledge of Japanese mythology and folk religion while studying popular narrative traditions representative of their historical eras. By peering into the liminal spaces connecting the living with the dead, students will also develop critical thinking and media literacy through careful investigation into the matters that people of different times and places have perceived as monstrous, alien, and unspeakable. Issues of gender, sexuality, and ethnic minority status will receive special attention as we navigate theories relating to the cultural role and relevance of ghosts. Strong writing skills are recommended, but no prior knowledge of Japan or the Japanese language is required.
EALC 3559-401 Gender and Sexuality in Japan F 1:45 PM-4:44 PM If you have ever wondered about the following questions, then this is the right course for you: Is Japan a hyper-feminine nation of smiling geisha and obedient wives? Is it a hyper-masculine nation of samurai and economic warriors? Is it true that Japanese wives control the household? Is it true that Japanese men suffer from over-dependence on their mothers? What do young Japanese women and young men worry about? What does the government think about the future of Japanese women and men? Assuming that expressions of gender and sexuality are deeply influenced by cultural and social factors, and that they also show profound differences regionally and historically, this course examines a variety of texts--historical, biographical, autobiographical, fictional, non-fictional, visual, cinematic, analytical, theoretical--in order to better understand the complexity of any attempts to answer the above questions. GSWS3559401 Cross Cultural Analysis
EALC 3621-401 Introduction to Classical Chinese I Victor H Mair TR 1:45 PM-3:14 PM Introduction to the classical written language, beginning with Shadick, First Course in Literary Chinese. Students with a background in Japanese, Korean, Cantonese, Taiwanese, and other East Asian languages are welcome; it is not necessary to know Mandarin. The course begins from scratch, and swiftly but rigorously develops the ability to read a wide variety of classical and semi-classical styles. Original texts from the 6th century BC to the 20th century AD are studied. This course is taught in English and there are no prerequisites. EALC7621401
EALC 3681-401 Introduction to Classical Mongolian Narantsetseg Tseveendulam T 12:00 PM-2:59 PM In this class students who already know some modern Mongolian in the Cyrillic script will learn how to transfer that knowledge to the reading of first post-classical, and then classical texts written in the vertical or Uyghur-Mongolian script. Topics covered will include the Mongolian alphabetic script, dealing with ambiguous readings, scholarly transcription, vowel harmony and syllable structure, post-classical and classical forms of major declensions, converbs, verbal nouns, and finite verbs, syntax, pronunciation and scribal readings. Readings will be adjusted to interests, but as a rule will include selections from short stories, diaries, chronicles, Buddhist translations, government documents, popular didactic poetry, ritual texts, and traditional narratives. Students will also be introduced to the most important reference works helpful in reading classical and post-classical Mongolian. EALC7681401
EALC 4030-032 Major Seminar on China Teemu Ruskola CANCELED This is a seminar required for all Chinese majors in the Department of East Asian Languages and Civilization. Topic varies year to year. Perm Needed From Department
EALC 4999-032 Independent Study Teemu Ruskola Independent study in courses with East Asian content for undergraduates Perm Needed From Department
EALC 5020-301 Chinese History and Civilization Ori Tavor R 3:30 PM-6:29 PM This seminar offers a thematic overview of the academic study of Chinese history from the Neolithic period to the 21st century. Over the course of the semester, students will be introduced to different scholarly approaches to the study of history through a close reading and analysis of the work of leading scholars in the field of Sinology. We will learn about the various subfields in the study of history, such as cultural history, social history, administrative and legal history, intellectual history, history of religion, literary history, history of gender, world history, and historiography, examine their different methodological frameworks and tools, and draw on them in order to problematize and enrich our understanding of Chinese culture. In addition, this seminar will provide incoming students with the relevant tools to produce original graduate-level research on all aspects of Chinese history, society, and culture and present it in a clear and persuasive fashion orally and in written form. While original-language research for the final project is encouraged, all course materials will be in English.
EALC 5040-301 Japanese History and Civilization David Spafford F 10:15 AM-1:14 PM This seminar introduces students to the graduate-level study of Japan. In addition to getting a broad overview of Japanese culture, students in the course will develop familiarity with major debates in the history of the field of Japanese studies. The course also provides basic training in using primary and secondary sources in Japanese, Japanese bibliographic conventions, and other skills necessary for pursuing advanced research or a teaching career in the field. Open to all graduate students and to undergraduates with permission from the instructor. Familiarity with Japanese language is a plus but is not required.
EALC 5129-401 Chinese Architecture Nancy R S Steinhardt TR 12:00 PM-1:29 PM Survey of Chinese buildings and building technology from the formative period in the second millennium BCE through the twentieth century. The course will deal with well-known monuments such as the Buddhist monasteries of Wutai, imperial palaces in Chang'an and Beijing, the Ming tombs and the Temple of Heaven, and less frequently studied buildings. Also covered will be the theory and principles of Chinese construction. EALC1129401
EALC 5160-401 Arts of Korea Frank L Chance MW 1:45 PM-3:14 PM The goal of this course is understanding the development of visual, performing, and literary arts in Korea and the historical, religious, and social contexts in which they flourished. It serves as an introduction to the arts of Korea, with emphasis on painting, sculpture, ceramics, and architecture and additional consideration of dance, drama, poetry, and culinary arts. Covers the whole history of Korea, from prehistoric times to the twenty-first century. Students enrolled in this graduate number are expected to do research in an East Asian language. EALC0160401 https://coursesintouch.apps.upenn.edu/cpr/jsp/fast.do?webService=syll&t=202230&c=EALC5160401
EALC 5521-640 Introduction to Classical Chinese Thought Paul Rakita Goldin This course is intended as an introduction to the foundational thinkers of Chinese civilization, who flourished from the fifth to the second centuries B.C. No knowledge of Chinese is presumed, and there are no prerequisites, although Introduction to Chinese Civilization is recommended. Graduate students should see the instructor to discuss requirements for graduate credit.
EALC 5711-401 East Asian Diplomacy Frederick R Dickinson MW 12:00 PM-12:59 PM Home to four of the five most populous states and four of the five largest economies, the Asia/Pacific is arguably the most dynamic region in the twenty-first century. At the same time, Cold War remnants (a divided Korea and China) and major geopolitical shifts (the rise of China and India, decline of the US and Japan) contribute significantly to the volatility of our world. This course will examine the political, economic, and geopolitical dynamism of the region through a survey of relations among the great powers in Asia from the sixteenth century to the present. Special emphasis will be given to regional and global developments from the perspective of the three principal East Asian states--China, Japan and Korea. We will explore the many informal, as well as formal, means of intercourse that have made East Asia what it is today. Graduate students should consult graduate syllabus for graduate reading list, special recitation time and graduate requirements. EALC1711401, HIST1550401, HIST5550401
EALC 5711-402 East Asian Diplomacy Home to four of the five most populous states and four of the five largest economies, the Asia/Pacific is arguably the most dynamic region in the twenty-first century. At the same time, Cold War remnants (a divided Korea and China) and major geopolitical shifts (the rise of China and India, decline of the US and Japan) contribute significantly to the volatility of our world. This course will examine the political, economic, and geopolitical dynamism of the region through a survey of relations among the great powers in Asia from the sixteenth century to the present. Special emphasis will be given to regional and global developments from the perspective of the three principal East Asian states--China, Japan and Korea. We will explore the many informal, as well as formal, means of intercourse that have made East Asia what it is today. Graduate students should consult graduate syllabus for graduate reading list, special recitation time and graduate requirements. HIST5550402
EALC 6121-401 Chinese Wall Painting Nancy R S Steinhardt T 1:45 PM-4:44 PM This courses examines murals in Chinese temples and tombs from their earliest appearance in the first millennium BCE through the 20th century. Some are in situ; others are in museums. Murals are studied alongside paintings on silk and paper. Chinese wall painting is also studied alongside murals in temples and tombs in Korea, Japan, and Mongolia. EALC2121401
EALC 6221-401 Chinese Poetry & Prose In Translation Victor H Mair TR 8:30 AM-9:59 AM A wide variety of poetic & prose genres from the earliest times to the 19th century is introduced through English translation. A few selections will also be studied in Chinese characters with romanized transcriptions. There are no prerequisites for this course. EALC2221401
EALC 7246-401 The Tale of Genji Linda H Chance TR 3:30 PM-4:59 PM "Crowning masterpiece of Japanese literature," "the world's first novel," "fountainhead of Japanese literary and aesthetic culture," "a great soap opera in the vein of Jacqueline Susann." Readers over the centuries have praised the Tale of Genji, the monumental prose tale finished just after the year 1000, in a variety of ways. In this course we will read the latest English translation of Murasaki Shikibu's work. We will watch as Genji loses his mother at a tender age, is cast out of the royal family, and begins a quest to fill the void she left. Along the way, Genji's loyalty to all the women he encounters forges his reputation as the ideal lover. We will consider gender issues in the female author's portrayal of this rake, and question the changing audience, from bored court women to censorious monks, from adoring nationalists to comic book adaptors. Study of the tale requires consideration of poetry, imagery, costume, music, history, religion, theater, political and material culture, all of which will be components of the course. We will also trace the effect of the tale's many motifs, from flora and fauna to murderously jealous spirits, on later literature and conceptions of human emotions. All material is in English translation. There are no prerequisites. EALC3246401, GSWS3246401
EALC 7621-401 Introduction to Classical Chinese I Victor H Mair TR 1:45 PM-3:14 PM Introduction to the classical written language, beginning with Shadick, First Course in Literary Chinese. Students with a background in Japanese, Korean, Cantonese, Taiwanese, and other East Asian languages are welcome; it is not necessary to know Mandarin. The course begins from scratch, and swiftly but rigorously develops the ability to read a wide variety of classical and semi-classical styles. Original texts from the 6th century BC to the 20th century AD are studied. This course is taught in English and there are no prerequisites. EALC3621401
EALC 7681-401 Introduction to Classical Mongolian Narantsetseg Tseveendulam T 12:00 PM-2:59 PM In this class students who already know some modern Mongolian in the Cyrillic script will learn how to transfer that knowledge to the reading of first post-classical, and then classical texts written in the vertical or Uyghur-Mongolian script. Topics covered will include the Mongolian alphabetic script, dealing with ambiguous readings, scholarly transcription, vowel harmony and syllable structure, post-classical and classical forms of major declensions, converbs, verbal nouns, and finite verbs, syntax, pronunciation and scribal readings. Readings will be adjusted to interests, but as a rule will include selections from short stories, diaries, chronicles, Buddhist translations, government documents, popular didactic poetry, ritual texts, and traditional narratives. Students will also be introduced to the most important reference works helpful in reading classical and post-classical Mongolian. EALC3681401
EALC 8140-401 Japanese Art Seminar Julie N Davis W 1:45 PM-4:44 PM This seminar engages specific topics in Japanese art history from 1600 to the present, with the specific focus varying from year to year. Previous topics have included: the concept of the artist; gender and its representation; the visualization of place from the early modern to the present; collecting, the market, modernity, and the construction of the field; print cultures; among others. Sessions will be conducted on site, in museums, galleries, and libraries, as available. Assignments vary depending upon the focus of the seminar. Japanese language ability useful but not necessary; curiosity and engagement required. ARTH7150401
EALC 8521-301 Tang-Song Religious and Medical Texts Hsiao-Wen Cheng W 3:30 PM-6:29 PM This seminar aims at developing the skill in reading religious and medical texts of a range of different genres from the Tang-Song period, including treatises in medical theory, no sological texts, recipe compilations, material medical, macrobiotic texts, Buddhist and Daoist meditation and ritual instructions, as well as case histories in anecdotal forms. There are a variety of topics we can choose to focus on the studying those texts, and the choice will be made on the students' on research interests. Each week we will look at one type of texts, consider its edition, textual history, chapter organization and genre (sometimes with background readings), read line-by-line a sample text assigned in advance, as well as sight-read short samples that students bring to class. . At least one year Classical Chinese is required.
EALC 8588-001 Religion & Ethnicity in Inner Asia Christopher Pratt Atwood MW 1:45 PM-3:14 PM "Religion and Ethnicity in Inner Asia" will examine these two phenomena and their interaction in Inner Asia from earliest times to the present. The class will cover Mongolia, Tibet, Kazakhstan, and Turkic and Mongolian peoples of Russia and China. Religions addressed primarily include Buddhism, Islam, shamanism, and secularism. Why "ethnicity and religion"? In practice the scholarly research and literature on these two topics in Inner Asia have been closely related. In addition to theoretical works on ethnicity, nationalism, religion and identity, the class will focus on issues such as ethnicity and religious conversions, place-based ethnic and religious identities, ethnicity and the Chinese and Russian states, nationalism, nationality policy, reformist and atheist secularisms, revivalist and apocalyptic movements, and the intersection of ethnicity, race, sexuality, and international networks.
EALC 8600-680 Chinese Language Pedagogy and Methods Ye Tian TR 1:45 PM-3:14 PM This graduate course is designed to equip students with the most advanced and up-to-date theoretical knowledge and practical skills of teaching modern Chinese with emphasis on the instruction of beginning and intermediate levels. The theoretical component introduces you to both mainstream and innovative theoretical frameworks in second-language acquisition and sociology of education, including teaching within the National Standards; communication-based audio-lingo approach; backward design; prosodic syntax in Chinese; official knowledge; tracking; ecologies of resources; assessment and testing. The practical component emphasizes everyday classroom situations and discusses diverse teaching concepts and the development of individual teaching strategies and styles. Special attention will be given to concrete teaching and learning strategies within the communication-based audio-lingo approach, including Chinese grammar illustration, corrective feedback, teaching techniques, educational technologies, etc.
Chinese proficiency at the advanced level is required because this course will be taught in both Chinese and English, and many of the reading materials are in Chinese.
CHIN8600680
EALC 8621-401 Advanced Classical Chinese I Ori Tavor MW 3:30 PM-4:59 PM Close reading and interpretation of texts in various styles of classical Chinese drawn from the Han, Wei, Tang, and Song periods. Focus on strengthening students' reading ability in classical Chinese. Attention to questions of style, rhetoric, and syntax.
EALC 8625-301 Chinese Palaeography Adam D Smith MW 12:00 PM-1:29 PM The goal of this class is to learn to read excavated texts from Early China in difficult early orthographies. As well as reading the texts in the usual way for their intellectual, literary or historical content, we will focus on the script in which they are written, and examine critically some of the philological methods that are used to turn an excavated manuscript into a readable "edition". We will also consider how excavated texts relate to each other and to received texts, and how they might have been produced, circulated and consumed. The exact choice of texts for this course has varied each time, and may be modified to suit the interests and prior preparation of students. Typically we will be concentrating on ca. 300 BCE literary and philosophical texts. These present richer and more instructive philological challenges than later Han-period manuscripts, while not being as obscurely difficult as the inscriptions from the Western Zhou and Shang periods. They also present substantial challenges to traditional views of Early China and its literature and thought.
EALC 8659-301 Japanese for Sinologists Linda H Chance TR 7:00 PM-8:29 PM An accelerated course in scholarly Japanese for Sinologists and others with a knowledge of Chinese characters.
EALC 9950-008 Dissertation Nancy R S Steinhardt Registration for PhD students who have finished coursework and are writing their dissertation.
JPAN 0100-001 Beginning Japanese I Nana Takeda Kolb MTW 10:15 AM-11:14 AM
R 10:15 AM-11:44 AM
Intended for students who have no Japanese background. All four skills, speaking/listening/writing/reading, are equally emphasized. Hiragana/Katakana (Two sets of Japanese syllabic letters) and some Chinese characters (Kanji) are introduced. Textbooks: Genki I (Lesson 1- Lesson 7). Kanji: reproduction-approx.70/recognitio-approx.110 https://coursesintouch.apps.upenn.edu/cpr/jsp/fast.do?webService=syll&t=202230&c=JPAN0100001
JPAN 0100-002 Beginning Japanese I Nana Takeda Kolb MTW 12:00 PM-12:59 PM
R 12:00 PM-1:29 PM
Intended for students who have no Japanese background. All four skills, speaking/listening/writing/reading, are equally emphasized. Hiragana/Katakana (Two sets of Japanese syllabic letters) and some Chinese characters (Kanji) are introduced. Textbooks: Genki I (Lesson 1- Lesson 7). Kanji: reproduction-approx.70/recognitio-approx.110 https://coursesintouch.apps.upenn.edu/cpr/jsp/fast.do?webService=syll&t=202230&c=JPAN0100002
JPAN 0100-003 Beginning Japanese I R 3:30 PM-4:59 PM
MTW 3:30 PM-4:29 PM
Intended for students who have no Japanese background. All four skills, speaking/listening/writing/reading, are equally emphasized. Hiragana/Katakana (Two sets of Japanese syllabic letters) and some Chinese characters (Kanji) are introduced. Textbooks: Genki I (Lesson 1- Lesson 7). Kanji: reproduction-approx.70/recognitio-approx.110
JPAN 0103-680 Spoken Japanese I Akiko Takamura Barnes TR 5:15 PM-7:14 PM Intended for students who have no Japanese background. The major emphasis is on oral communication skills, although some reading and writing instructions are given. Japanese pop-culture will also be incorporated. https://coursesintouch.apps.upenn.edu/cpr/jsp/fast.do?webService=syll&t=202230&c=JPAN0103680
JPAN 0210-001 Intensive Beginning Japanese I MTWRF 10:15 AM-11:44 AM Intended for students who have little or no background in Japanese who wish to finish the language requirement in one year. This is equivalent to Beginning Japanese I & II in one semester, 2 CU. Textbooks: Genki I (Lesson 1-Lesson 12) and Genki II (Lesson 13-Lesson 14) Kanji: reproduction-approx.170/recognitio-approx.250
JPAN 0300-001 Intermediate Japanese I Akiko Takamura Barnes MTW 10:15 AM-11:14 AM
R 10:15 AM-11:44 AM
This course is a continuation of Beginning Japanese II and focuses on the development of the elementary grammatical structures of the Japanese language through aural-oral practices. The course also aims to develop the four basic skills: listening, speaking, reading, and writing. The course also introduces aspects of Japanese culture and customs, knowledge that is necessary for behaving in a socio-culturally appropriate manner. Students will learn and practice skills to communicate in situations they might face in real life. Example topics and functions are travel, part-time job, work, asking for favors, asking permission, stating your intension/opinion, reporting what you heard, and various speech styles including Keigo (respectful speech).Textbooks: Genki II (Lesson 15- Lesson 21) will be covered, and around 100 new Kanji will be introduced. Overall kanji knowledge will be 286.
JPAN 0300-002 Intermediate Japanese I Akiko Takamura Barnes MTW 12:00 PM-12:59 PM
R 12:00 PM-1:29 PM
This course is a continuation of Beginning Japanese II and focuses on the development of the elementary grammatical structures of the Japanese language through aural-oral practices. The course also aims to develop the four basic skills: listening, speaking, reading, and writing. The course also introduces aspects of Japanese culture and customs, knowledge that is necessary for behaving in a socio-culturally appropriate manner. Students will learn and practice skills to communicate in situations they might face in real life. Example topics and functions are travel, part-time job, work, asking for favors, asking permission, stating your intension/opinion, reporting what you heard, and various speech styles including Keigo (respectful speech).Textbooks: Genki II (Lesson 15- Lesson 21) will be covered, and around 100 new Kanji will be introduced. Overall kanji knowledge will be 286.
JPAN 0300-003 Intermediate Japanese I Akiko Takamura Barnes R 1:45 PM-3:14 PM
MTW 1:45 PM-2:44 PM
This course is a continuation of Beginning Japanese II and focuses on the development of the elementary grammatical structures of the Japanese language through aural-oral practices. The course also aims to develop the four basic skills: listening, speaking, reading, and writing. The course also introduces aspects of Japanese culture and customs, knowledge that is necessary for behaving in a socio-culturally appropriate manner. Students will learn and practice skills to communicate in situations they might face in real life. Example topics and functions are travel, part-time job, work, asking for favors, asking permission, stating your intension/opinion, reporting what you heard, and various speech styles including Keigo (respectful speech).Textbooks: Genki II (Lesson 15- Lesson 21) will be covered, and around 100 new Kanji will be introduced. Overall kanji knowledge will be 286.
JPAN 0500-001 High Intermediate Japanese I Megumu Tamura MTWR 10:15 AM-11:14 AM A continuation of Japanese language beyond the language requirement. Textbooks: Tobira: Gateway to Advanced Japanese (Unit 4-Unit 8) Kanji:reproduction-approx.400/recognitio-approx.550 https://coursesintouch.apps.upenn.edu/cpr/jsp/fast.do?webService=syll&t=202230&c=JPAN0500001
JPAN 0500-002 High Intermediate Japanese I Megumu Tamura MTWR 12:00 PM-12:59 PM A continuation of Japanese language beyond the language requirement. Textbooks: Tobira: Gateway to Advanced Japanese (Unit 4-Unit 8) Kanji:reproduction-approx.400/recognitio-approx.550 https://coursesintouch.apps.upenn.edu/cpr/jsp/fast.do?webService=syll&t=202230&c=JPAN0500002
JPAN 0700-001 Advanced Japanese I Megumu Tamura MW 1:45 PM-3:14 PM This course is a continuation of Japanese language at the upper intermediate level, and authentic materials and video clips will be used. https://coursesintouch.apps.upenn.edu/cpr/jsp/fast.do?webService=syll&t=202230&c=JPAN0700001
JPAN 0760-680 Japanese for the Professions I Tomoko Takami MW 3:30 PM-4:59 PM An intermediate level course of Japanese language focusing on workplace-related topics. Intended for students who will use Japanese in the professions. Textbook: Powering Up Your Japanese Through Case Studies: Intermediate and Advanced Japanese. https://coursesintouch.apps.upenn.edu/cpr/jsp/fast.do?webService=syll&t=202230&c=JPAN0760680
JPAN 1040-001 Advanced Japanese III Tomoko Takami MW 12:00 PM-1:29 PM A continuation of Japanese language beyond the intermediate level, and Authentic materials and video clips will be used. https://coursesintouch.apps.upenn.edu/cpr/jsp/fast.do?webService=syll&t=202230&c=JPAN1040001
JPAN 1080-680 Advanced Japanese for Proficiency I Nana Takeda Kolb MW 1:45 PM-3:14 PM This course is for students with an advanced background in Japanese, who are interested in taking at least the Level 2 Japanese Proficiency Test. Solid grammar, an extensive vocabulary, and the knowledge of at least 800-900 Chinese characters is required. This course is not continuous with any existing intermediate or advanced-level Japanese course; therefore, your grade from any of those courses does not qualify you to take this class. Eligibility will be determined through an interview and placement test taken in the first meeting. All students who take this course are required to take the Japanese Proficiency Test in December. Since the JLPT is administered in December every year, if you wish to fully prepare for the test, the instructor strongly recommends that you take Advanced Proficiency II in the same calendar year. For example, if you plan to take the test in December, take Advanced Proficiency II the prior spring and take Advanced Proficiency I in the fall. Different from other courses, this full-year course begins in the spring and ends in the fall, because the test is given in December. However, participation in 482 is optional. https://coursesintouch.apps.upenn.edu/cpr/jsp/fast.do?webService=syll&t=202230&c=JPAN1080680
KORN 0100-001 Beginning Korean I T 10:15 AM-11:14 AM
WR 10:15 AM-11:44 AM
This course is designed for students who have little or no knowledge of Korean. This course aims to develop foundational reading, writing, listening, and speaking skills through meaningful communicative activities and tasks. Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to comprehend and carry on simple daily conversations and create simple sentences in the past, present, and future tenses. Students will learn how to introduce themselves, describe their surroundings, talk about daily lives, friends and relatives, and talk about past and future events.
KORN 0100-002 Beginning Korean I Haewon Cho TW 12:00 PM-1:29 PM
M 12:00 PM-12:59 PM
This course is designed for students who have little or no knowledge of Korean. This course aims to develop foundational reading, writing, listening, and speaking skills through meaningful communicative activities and tasks. Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to comprehend and carry on simple daily conversations and create simple sentences in the past, present, and future tenses. Students will learn how to introduce themselves, describe their surroundings, talk about daily lives, friends and relatives, and talk about past and future events.
KORN 0100-003 Beginning Korean I TW 1:45 PM-3:14 PM
M 1:45 PM-2:44 PM
This course is designed for students who have little or no knowledge of Korean. This course aims to develop foundational reading, writing, listening, and speaking skills through meaningful communicative activities and tasks. Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to comprehend and carry on simple daily conversations and create simple sentences in the past, present, and future tenses. Students will learn how to introduce themselves, describe their surroundings, talk about daily lives, friends and relatives, and talk about past and future events.
KORN 0100-004 Beginning Korean I MW 3:30 PM-5:29 PM This course is designed for students who have little or no knowledge of Korean. This course aims to develop foundational reading, writing, listening, and speaking skills through meaningful communicative activities and tasks. Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to comprehend and carry on simple daily conversations and create simple sentences in the past, present, and future tenses. Students will learn how to introduce themselves, describe their surroundings, talk about daily lives, friends and relatives, and talk about past and future events.
KORN 0103-680 Spoken Korean I Siwon Lee MW 3:30 PM-4:59 PM This class is for those that have little to no knowledge of Korean. The main focus is the development of Korean communication skills by exploring a variety of everyday topics beyond school settings. Students will improve their Korean communication skills by engaging in a variety of interactive activities, role plays, and presentations. Class topics include, but are not limited to, introducing oneself, describing one's surroundings, discussing daily activities and past events, talking about common objects and people, etc. We will also introduce cultural topics in order to deepen students' understanding of Korea's culture and language. NOTE: This course does not count toward the language requirement or the EALC major or minor. Offered through the Penn Language Center.
KORN 0200-001 Beginning Korean II MW 3:30 PM-5:29 PM A continuation of Beginning Korean I, this course aims to further develop the four language skills of students to the novice-high level by building on materials covered in that class. Students will learn how to use three speech styles (polite formal, informal, and intimate) appropriately in a given context. Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to handle simple and elementary needs of daily lives and talk (and write) about a variety of topics such as family, college life, birthday celebration, shopping, Korean food, etc.
KORN 0220-001 Korean for Heritage Speakers I M 12:00 PM-12:59 PM
TW 12:00 PM-1:29 PM
This course is designed for heritage speakers who have a strong background in everyday Korean. This course focuses on enhancing linguistic accuracy (spelling, grammar, vocabulary, pronunciation) and fluency (idiomatic and figurative expressions, narrative structure, discursive practice) in both spoken and written Korean, as well as gaining a deeper understanding of Korean culture. Upon completion of the course, students will be able to express themselves more accurately and participate in Korea-related communities more meaningfully. This course and its subsequent course KORN0420 complete the College language requirement.
KORN 0300-001 Intermediate Korean I Siwon Lee WR 12:00 PM-1:29 PM
T 12:00 PM-12:59 PM
This is a continuation of Elementary Korean II. This course is designed to develop students' Korean language proficiency to the intermediate-low level of the ACTFL Proficiency Guidelines. Authentic materials, as well as various student-centered activities that are highly contextualized in everyday interactions will be used. Upon completion of the course, students will be able to present and exchange information on a variety of topics such as weather, fashion, travel, mailing, housing, public transportation, and shopping.
KORN 0300-002 Intermediate Korean I Siwon Lee TR 3:30 PM-5:29 PM This is a continuation of Elementary Korean II. This course is designed to develop students' Korean language proficiency to the intermediate-low level of the ACTFL Proficiency Guidelines. Authentic materials, as well as various student-centered activities that are highly contextualized in everyday interactions will be used. Upon completion of the course, students will be able to present and exchange information on a variety of topics such as weather, fashion, travel, mailing, housing, public transportation, and shopping.
KORN 0500-001 High Intermediate Korean I Haewon Cho TR 10:15 AM-11:44 AM This course aims to develop functional proficiency in Korean at the intermediate-high level. Students will develop competence in fluency, grammatical accuracy and socio-linguistic/cultural appropriateness through a variety of activities and assignments. In addition, students will learn to communicate using more sophisticated grammatical structures and advanced vocabulary on various topics. The development of each of the four language skills (speaking, listening, reading and writing) is equally emphasized.
KORN 0560-680 Business Communication in Korean Haewon Cho MW 3:30 PM-4:59 PM Offered through the Penn Language Center. This course is designed to help students improve their Korean language proficiency by learning essential communication skills necessary to engage in business in Korea. Students will also develop their knowledge of and competence in Korean business culture and practice. The course objectives include: (1) to learn essential business terms, advanced grammar structures and communication strategies in business transactions; (2) to learn Korean business customs and culture, work norms, and business etiquette that students need to successfully communicate in a Korean business context. Topics include job application, business correspondence and reports, discussion and presentation in business meetings, communication styles and strategies in business contexts, current business culture, etc.
KORN 0700-001 Advanced Korean TR 10:15 AM-11:44 AM This course aims to develop an in-depth understanding of Korean culture and society through the analysis of spoken and written Korean discourse. Students will engage with key sociolinguistic concepts of politeness, hierarchy, solidarity, power, age, and gender, and enhance their advanced vocabulary and grammar. Students will also develop their abilities in conversation management, self-presentation, socialization, and sense of socio-cultural appropriateness, and gain a better understanding of how native speakers' cultural practices are reflected in language use and how interpersonal relationships are built and maintained through language.
KORN 0870-680 Current Korean Media I TR 3:30 PM-4:59 PM Offered through the Penn Language Center. This course aims to develop a deeper understanding of the contemporary Korean society through critical analysis of language use and viewpoints expressed in various types of media including the internet, TV, films and newspapers. This course will provide students with a rich opportunity to relate what they have learned in previous Korean language courses to the larger context of Korean culture and society. The course is conducted entirely in Korean and utilizes both written and audiovisual materials to develop students' reading/listening comprehension and critical thinking. The course also involves in-depth class discussion and writing short compositions to enhance conversation and writing skills.
KORN 1040-001 Advanced Readings in Modern Korean I Siwon Lee M 5:15 PM-8:14 PM This course is designed for advanced level students. Based on literary pieces in the form of short stories, essays, and novels, students are to gain an in-depth, multi-faceted and critical understanding of Korean people, society, and culture. These objectives are achieved primarily through 1) close reading and discussion of original literary texts by 20th -century Korean writers; and 2) regular writing exercises. Some Korean films that are related to the topics of the reading text will be used.
KORN 1060-680 Advanced Business Korean I MW 5:15 PM-6:44 PM Offered through the Penn Language Center. This course aims to further develop students' advanced language proficiency and simultaneously deepen their knowledge and understanding of specific areas related to Korean business and economy such as an expansion of business into Asian markets and globalization strategies. Through research, discussion and presentation on various case studies and other business-related materials, students will enhance their critical thinking skills and gain an in-depth perspective on issues related to contemporary Korean business operations and practices.